The Great O'Malley (1937)

70-71 mins | Drama | 13 February 1937

Director:

William Dieterle

Cinematographer:

Ernest Haller

Editor:

Warren Low

Production Designer:

Hugh Reticker

Production Company:

Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
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HISTORY

The film's working title was The Making of O'Malley, which was also the title of the 1925 First National film which was also based on the Gerald Beaumont story (see AFI Catalog of Feature Films, 1921-30; F2.3352). ...

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The film's working title was The Making of O'Malley, which was also the title of the 1925 First National film which was also based on the Gerald Beaumont story (see AFI Catalog of Feature Films, 1921-30; F2.3352).

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SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
7 Jul 1936
p. 3
Daily Variety
3 Dec 1936
p. 3
Film Daily
9 Mar 1937
p. 10
Hollywood Reporter
3 Dec 1936
p. 3
Motion Picture Daily
3 Dec 1936
p. 10
Motion Picture Herald
3 Oct 1935
p. 35
Motion Picture Herald
12 Dec 1935
p. 56
New York Times
6 Mar 1937
p. 10
Variety
10 Mar 1937
p. 14
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Dial dir
Asst dir
PRODUCERS
Exec prod
Exec prod
Assoc prod
WRITERS
Scr
Contr to trmt
Contr to trmt
Contr to scr const
PHOTOGRAPHY
Photog
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
COSTUMES
MUSIC
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the short story "The Making of O'Malley" by Gerald Beaumont in Red Book Magazine (Oct 1924).
LITERARY SOURCE AUTHOR
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
The Making of O'Malley
Release Date:
13 February 1937
Production Date:
began late Jul 1936
Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc. & The Vitaphone Corp.
30 December 1936
LP6853
Physical Properties:
Sound
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
70-71
Length(in reels):
8
Country:
United States
PCA No:
2451
SYNOPSIS

Policeman James Aloysius O'Malley knows the law better than any other policeman. He is constantly issuing citations for obscure laws that are generally no longer enforced. For this reason, the people on his beat dislike him and his fellow police officers make fun of him, but O'Malley is convinced that the law is the law and must be enforced exactly as written, even if it causes trouble for otherwise law-abiding citizens. His mother encourages him to follow in his father's strict footsteps until he stops her from throwing breadcrumbs to the birds because that would be littering. O'Malley stops John Phillips for a noisy muffler, and even though Phillips agrees to fix it, begging O'Malley not to make him late for his job, O'Malley insists on writing him a ticket. Phillips, whose daughter Barbara is crippled, loses his job and is forced to pawn his army gun and war medals. When he cannot get the money he needs, he robs a store, but is quickly arrested by O'Malley, who stops him again for his noisy muffler. After Phillips is sent to prison, despite his lawyer's pleas for mercy, O'Malley is demoted to school crossing duty in hopes that he will learn to temper the law with human feeling. While working, he becomes friends with Barbara, not realizing that she is Phillip's daughter. When he learns her identity, he is guilt-stricken and secretly arranges for Barbara's leg to be fixed, secures Phillips' release from prison and convinces his former employer to rehire him. Not knowing of O'Malley's efforts, Phillips expects to be hounded by the policeman. When O'Malley appears at ...

More Less

Policeman James Aloysius O'Malley knows the law better than any other policeman. He is constantly issuing citations for obscure laws that are generally no longer enforced. For this reason, the people on his beat dislike him and his fellow police officers make fun of him, but O'Malley is convinced that the law is the law and must be enforced exactly as written, even if it causes trouble for otherwise law-abiding citizens. His mother encourages him to follow in his father's strict footsteps until he stops her from throwing breadcrumbs to the birds because that would be littering. O'Malley stops John Phillips for a noisy muffler, and even though Phillips agrees to fix it, begging O'Malley not to make him late for his job, O'Malley insists on writing him a ticket. Phillips, whose daughter Barbara is crippled, loses his job and is forced to pawn his army gun and war medals. When he cannot get the money he needs, he robs a store, but is quickly arrested by O'Malley, who stops him again for his noisy muffler. After Phillips is sent to prison, despite his lawyer's pleas for mercy, O'Malley is demoted to school crossing duty in hopes that he will learn to temper the law with human feeling. While working, he becomes friends with Barbara, not realizing that she is Phillip's daughter. When he learns her identity, he is guilt-stricken and secretly arranges for Barbara's leg to be fixed, secures Phillips' release from prison and convinces his former employer to rehire him. Not knowing of O'Malley's efforts, Phillips expects to be hounded by the policeman. When O'Malley appears at the Phillips' door, Phillips shoots him in a panic. Then when he learns the truth, he offers his own blood for an emergency transfusion to O'Malley. O'Malley recovers and returns to his old beat, but this time, he is more reasonable. He becomes popular with the neighbors, and Judy Nolan, Barbara's teacher, falls in love with him.

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Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.