The In Crowd (1988)

PG | 95 mins | Romantic comedy, Drama | 5 February 1988

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HISTORY

Portions of the end credits were illegible on the viewed print. Crew credits, music credits, and acknowledgements may not reflect what appears on screen.
       End credits include thanks to: “Temple University; The City of Philadelphia, Mayor Wilson Goode; The Philadelphia Film Office, Mr. R.C. Staab, Film Commissioner; The Archdiocese of Philadelphia and Dr. Robert Paulstin; Cheltenham High School and Doclie Leeds; Freedom Theater, John Allen; Sharon Tendler; Mendlers of Philadelphia; Domino’s Pizza of Philadelphia and Anne Bridges; Kanasho International (USA), Inc.; South Eastern Pennsylvania Transportation Authority; Barron’s Educational Series Inc., SAT – College Entrance Examination, Bromsteen, Wener, Green. © 1986.”
       End credits also state: “Film Clips: ‘Alka Seltzer’ commercial courtesy of Norm Marshall and Associates, Inc., and Miles Laboratories; ‘The Art Laboe Show’ courtesy of Original Sound Entertainment and Art Laboe.”
       Additionally, end credits acknowledge: “Art Laboe, Wink Martindale, Peter Potter, Sam Riddle, Robin Seymour, Lloyd Thaxton.”
       The co-writer of the song “A Wonderful Dream” is incorrectly identified onscreen as “Colin Marshall.” The writer’s name is Edward Marshall.
       The In Crowd marked the first starring role for actor Donovan Leitch who had previously appeared in small roles in television comedies and music videos. Leitch is the son of British singer-songwriter Donovan, who had numerous hits in the 1960s, including “Sunshine Superman,” “Mello Yellow,” “Season Of The Witch,” “Wear Your Love Like Heaven,” and “Hurdy Gurdy Man.”
       The In Crowd also marked the directorial debut for Mark Rosenthal, who co-wrote the script with Lawrence Konner. The pair had previously written screenplays for The Jewel of the Nile (1985), The Legend of Billie Jean (1985) and Superman IV: ... More Less

Portions of the end credits were illegible on the viewed print. Crew credits, music credits, and acknowledgements may not reflect what appears on screen.
       End credits include thanks to: “Temple University; The City of Philadelphia, Mayor Wilson Goode; The Philadelphia Film Office, Mr. R.C. Staab, Film Commissioner; The Archdiocese of Philadelphia and Dr. Robert Paulstin; Cheltenham High School and Doclie Leeds; Freedom Theater, John Allen; Sharon Tendler; Mendlers of Philadelphia; Domino’s Pizza of Philadelphia and Anne Bridges; Kanasho International (USA), Inc.; South Eastern Pennsylvania Transportation Authority; Barron’s Educational Series Inc., SAT – College Entrance Examination, Bromsteen, Wener, Green. © 1986.”
       End credits also state: “Film Clips: ‘Alka Seltzer’ commercial courtesy of Norm Marshall and Associates, Inc., and Miles Laboratories; ‘The Art Laboe Show’ courtesy of Original Sound Entertainment and Art Laboe.”
       Additionally, end credits acknowledge: “Art Laboe, Wink Martindale, Peter Potter, Sam Riddle, Robin Seymour, Lloyd Thaxton.”
       The co-writer of the song “A Wonderful Dream” is incorrectly identified onscreen as “Colin Marshall.” The writer’s name is Edward Marshall.
       The In Crowd marked the first starring role for actor Donovan Leitch who had previously appeared in small roles in television comedies and music videos. Leitch is the son of British singer-songwriter Donovan, who had numerous hits in the 1960s, including “Sunshine Superman,” “Mello Yellow,” “Season Of The Witch,” “Wear Your Love Like Heaven,” and “Hurdy Gurdy Man.”
       The In Crowd also marked the directorial debut for Mark Rosenthal, who co-wrote the script with Lawrence Konner. The pair had previously written screenplays for The Jewel of the Nile (1985), The Legend of Billie Jean (1985) and Superman IV: The Quest for Peace (1987) (see entries).
       Promotional material in AMPAS library files indicate that Rosenthal grew up in Philadelphia, PA, in the 1960s, a time when several locally produced dance/music television shows aimed at teenagers aired in the city and dancing ability was considered a way to measure a man’s prowess. Rosenthal was a dancer on one of those shows and drew on his experiences to write the screenplay, saying he wanted to capture the innocence of both the era and of rock music “before corporate America saw the profit potential of rock and roll and changed it forever.”
       Principal photography began in Philadelphia on 28 Jul 1986, according to the 6 Aug 1986 DV production chart. The film had an eight-week shooting schedule. The set for Perry Parker’s television studio was built in the Tomlinson Theater on the Temple University campus.
       The In Crowd was released in thirty-seven theaters in the Philadelphia area for a short test booking on 5 Feb 1988, earning $136,567 during that time, according to BoxOfficeMojo.com. However, Orion Pictures opted not to release it theatrically, according to the 31 Aug 1988 Var. Instead, the film was scheduled to be released on home video on 22 Sep 1988.
       Although the film began production using the title, The In Crowd and was released on home video with that name, two other working titles were used during production. The Oct 1986 Box listed the title as Bandstand, while the 15 Nov 1988 DV review stated the film was also known as Dance Party.
       In Mar 1988, Jerry Blavat, a Philadelphia DJ who hosted a television dance party in the 1960s, filed a lawsuit against Orion Pictures and co-scripters Mark Rosenthal and Lawrence Konner, charging the film illegally used his unique public persona, according to the 16 Mar 1988 Var. The suit claimed the “Perry Parker” character’s dress, mannerisms and speech patterns were too similar to Blavat’s. The May 1989 Box reported the suit had been settled, but did not offer any details about the settlement.


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GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
Oct 1986.
---
Box Office
May 1989.
---
Daily Variety
6 Aug 1986.
---
Daily Variety
15 Nov 1988.
---
Variety
16 Mar 1988.
---
Variety
31 Aug 1988.
---
Variety
9 Nov 1988
P. 16.
CAST
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
[and]
Bruce Kirby
co-starring:
as Dugan
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PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
An Orion Pictures Release
A Force Ten Production
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Unit prod mgr
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
2d 2d asst dir
3d asst dir
PRODUCERS
Co-prod
Assoc prod
Exec prod
Exec prod
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Addl photog
1st asst cam
2d asst cam
2d asst cam
Steadicam op
Cam trainee
Video asst
Video playback supv by
Best boy elec
Key grip
Best boy grip
Dolly grip
Dolly grip
Still photog
ART DIRECTORS
Asst art dir
Storyboards by
Art dept asst
FILM EDITORS
1st asst ed
Asst ed
Asst ed
Apprentice ed
Negative cutting
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Leadman
On set dresser
Prop master
Asst prop master
Asst props
Const coord
Const foreman
Scenic artist
COSTUMES
Cost des
Ward supv
Ward set person
Ward asst
Ward asst
MUSIC
Orig score
Mus ed
Orch
SOUND
Sd mixer
Boom op
Boom op
Sd dept asst
Supv sd ed
Sd ed
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
VISUAL EFFECTS
Visual consultant and opening title seq created by
Spec eff coord
DANCE
Choreog
Addl choreog
Asst choreog
Spec dance consultant
MAKEUP
Makeup supv
2d makeup
Key hair stylist
Hairdresser
Asst hairdresser
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
Prod exec
Philadelphia prod secy
Asst to Mark Rosenthal
Loc mgr
Asst loc mgr
Scr supv
Prod coord
Post prod coord
Prod controller
Prod accountant
Accounting consultant
Unit pub
Transportation coord
Transportation capt
Craft service
Craft service
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod intern
Prod intern
Prod intern
Prod intern
Prod intern
Post prod facilities
Extras casting
STAND INS
Stunt coord
Gail's singing voice
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
COLOR PERSONNEL
Col by
SOURCES
SONGS
“Anyone Who Had A Heart,” written and produced by Hal David and Burt Bacharach, performed by Dionne Warwick, © Jac Music Co., Inc./Blue Seas Music Inc./U.S. Songs Inc.
“I Do,” words and music by Johnny Paden, Frank Paden, Jesse Smith, Willie Stephenson, and Melvin Mason, performed by The Marvelows, courtesy of Music Corporation of America, Inc. and Yvonne Publishers, courtesy of MCA Records
“Cast Your Fate To The Wind,” written by Carel Werber & Vince Guaraldi, by permission of Chappell and Co., Inc.
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SONGS
“Anyone Who Had A Heart,” written and produced by Hal David and Burt Bacharach, performed by Dionne Warwick, © Jac Music Co., Inc./Blue Seas Music Inc./U.S. Songs Inc.
“I Do,” words and music by Johnny Paden, Frank Paden, Jesse Smith, Willie Stephenson, and Melvin Mason, performed by The Marvelows, courtesy of Music Corporation of America, Inc. and Yvonne Publishers, courtesy of MCA Records
“Cast Your Fate To The Wind,” written by Carel Werber & Vince Guaraldi, by permission of Chappell and Co., Inc.
“The ‘In’ Crowd,” written by Betty Page, performed, produced and recorded by Dobie Gray for Dobie Gray Publications, by permission of Unichappell Music, Inc.
“Do You Love Me?” written by Berry Gordy, performed by The Contours, courtesy of Johns Music Co., Inc. & Motown Record Corp.
“Land Of A Thousand Dances,” written by Chris Kenner and Antoine Domino, Jr., performed by Wilson Pickett, by permission from Thursday Music Corporation & Anabela Music, Inc., courtesy of Atlantic Recording Corp., by arrangement with Warner Special Products
“The Real Thing,” performed by Tina Britt, written by J. Armstead, N. Ashford and V. Simpson, ©1965 Warner Tamerlane Publishing Corp. & Raleigh Music Inc., courtesy of Adventure Records, producer: Juggy Murray
“When You’re Young And In Love,” written by Van McCoy, performed by The Marvelettes, by permission of Unichappell Music, Inc., courtesy of Motown Record Corp.
“A Wonderful Dream,” written by Colin Marshall and Norman Margulies, Wind courtesy of SBK Visual Catalog, Inc., performed by The Majors, courtesy of CAB American Records, a division of Capitol Records, Inc.
“Shake A Tail Feather,” written by V. Rice, O. Hayes and A. Williams, performed by The Five Du Tones, courtesy of Vapac Music Publishing Company & Ernie Lucerne
“Sweet Soul Music,” written by Sam Cooke, with additional material by O. Redding & A. Conley, by arrangement with ABKCO Music, Inc. and IBDWAL Music, performed by Arthur Conley, courtesy of Atlantic Recording Corp, by arrangement with Warner Special Products
Additional music from Capital Production Music: “Visit Hawaii,” composed by Ole Georg, BMG, published by Softwear Music, BMG
“Like A Rolling Stone,” written by Bob Dylan, performed by Bob Dylan, © 1965 Warner Bros, Inc., courtesy of CBS Records
“Mickey’s Monkey,” written by B. Holland, L. Dozier & E. Holland, Jr., performed by Smokey Robinson & The Miracles, courtesy of Stone Agate Music Division & Motown Record Corp.
“Little Latin Lupe Lu,” written by B. Medley, performed by Mitch Ryder & The Detroit Wheels, courtesy of Conrad Music and ABZ Music Corp., a division of Roulette Records
“Mine Exclusively,” written by Sherlie Mae Matthews, performed by The Olympics, by permission of Rightsong Music, Inc., and Cayman Music, courtesy of Vee Jay Records
“(The) Loco-Motion,” written by Gerry Goffin & Carole King, performed by Little Eva, wind by courtesy of Screen Gems/EMI Music, Inc., and Combs Records, Inc.
“Moon River,” written by Henry Mancini & Johnny Mercer, performed by Jerry Butler, by permission of Formosa Music Corporation, courtesy of Vee Jay Records.
+
DETAILS
Alternate Titles:
Dance Party
Bandstand
Release Date:
5 February 1988
Production Date:
28 July--late September 1986
Copyright Claimant:
Orion Pictures Corporation
Copyright Date:
14 March 1988
Copyright Number:
PA360372
Physical Properties:
Sound
Dolby Stereo ® in selected theatres.
Color
Duration(in mins):
95
MPAA Rating:
PG
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
28254
SYNOPSIS

In 1965 Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, Perry Parker's Dance Party, one of the city’s most popular television programs aimed at teenagers, airs each weekday at 3:30 p.m. After school, teenagers rush over to WPHY-TV, hoping to get in the studio audience for the show. Other teenagers try to get on the show as dancers. Perry has about two dozen regulars who dance each day, but periodically selects a few others to dance for a day. Many more teenagers watch the show at home, including seventeen-year-old Del Green, a straight “A” student who hopes to go to medical school. Del practices his dance moves while watching in the living room of his parent’s suburban, split-level home. Del dreams of being one of the show’s dancers, saying he could die contentedly on his eighteenth birthday if he had the chance to dance with Vicky, a blonde beauty from an inner-city, working class neighborhood who is the most popular girl on the show. However, Del’s schoolmate and next-door neighbor, Gail Goren, reminds him that he needs to be studying for his College Board exams. One Friday afternoon, Del sneaks into the studio and is mistaken for a new dancer on Perry’s show. Vicky’s regular dance partner, Dugan, has just been banned from the show following an arrest for stealing a car. When the other boys are reluctant to become Vicky’s new dance partner, afraid of Dugan’s temper, Del volunteers to dance with her. In the green room before the show begins, Perry and the studio manager give the teens a pep talk, reminding them that the show must be the most important thing in their lives. ... +


In 1965 Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, Perry Parker's Dance Party, one of the city’s most popular television programs aimed at teenagers, airs each weekday at 3:30 p.m. After school, teenagers rush over to WPHY-TV, hoping to get in the studio audience for the show. Other teenagers try to get on the show as dancers. Perry has about two dozen regulars who dance each day, but periodically selects a few others to dance for a day. Many more teenagers watch the show at home, including seventeen-year-old Del Green, a straight “A” student who hopes to go to medical school. Del practices his dance moves while watching in the living room of his parent’s suburban, split-level home. Del dreams of being one of the show’s dancers, saying he could die contentedly on his eighteenth birthday if he had the chance to dance with Vicky, a blonde beauty from an inner-city, working class neighborhood who is the most popular girl on the show. However, Del’s schoolmate and next-door neighbor, Gail Goren, reminds him that he needs to be studying for his College Board exams. One Friday afternoon, Del sneaks into the studio and is mistaken for a new dancer on Perry’s show. Vicky’s regular dance partner, Dugan, has just been banned from the show following an arrest for stealing a car. When the other boys are reluctant to become Vicky’s new dance partner, afraid of Dugan’s temper, Del volunteers to dance with her. In the green room before the show begins, Perry and the studio manager give the teens a pep talk, reminding them that the show must be the most important thing in their lives. Perry hopes to someday rival Dick Clark and his American Bandstand show, but his ratings have recently been falling, so it is especially important for the teens to dance their best. Del is a natural on the dance floor and the studio audience loves Del and Vicky dancing together, so the director orders the cameramen to stay focused on them. However, the regular dancers, the “in crowd,” are jealous that Del is getting extra camera time and shove him around. Del falls to the floor, but recovers quickly and continues dancing to the audience’s delight. Afterward, Del invites Vicky out on a date Saturday night. She declines, but Perry insists she go out with him. Back at home, Gail becomes angry hearing Del is going out with Vicky, rather than going to a James Bond spy-themed party their friends are holding Saturday night. Vicky takes Del to a dance party at the Germantown Train Station, where her friends harass him, but Del quickly wins them over. However, Vicky ditches him to go on a date with her boyfriend, Dugan. Although upset, Del waits for Vicky to return so he can take her home, explaining that was the way he was raised. An eternal romantic, Vicky says she loves Dugan, but her father does not approve of their relationship because Dugan is a rebel and a troublemaker. She reports that Dugan plans to move to Hollywood, California, to become an actor and she plans to go with him. When Del takes Vicky home, her father, a policeman who goes by the nickname “Tiny,” comes outside to greet him, happy that his daughter is now dating a respectable boy. Vicky’s father makes the two kiss before Del leaves, and says he hopes to see more of Del. On Monday at school, the students, most of whom saw Del dancing on television, stare at him as he walks down the hall. Some of the girls even swoon in his presence. However, Del’s friends are angry he skipped their party. Although Del only intended to dance one time on Perry Parker’s Dance Party, after fan mail pours in, Perry begs Del to return. The station manager offers Del $20 a week to be a regular dancer paired with Vicky. Although still angry at the way Vicky dumped him for Dugan, he agrees. Soon Del and Vicky are the featured dancers in the show’s “Lover’s Spotlight” segment and Perry takes them to Atlantic City, New Jersey, to do numerous promotions, including posing as bride and groom for a wedding chapel. During another promotion, anyone who buys Perry’s new dance music compilation album, also gets to dance for a few seconds with Vicky or Del. The two are uncomfortable doing this, but Del makes the best of it by inviting a shy girl wearing leg braces to dance with him. Throughout this promotional campaign and the daily dancing on the show, the two become friends and Del agrees to pose as Vicky’s date again so she can really go out with Dugan without her father finding out. While they wait for Dugan to arrive on his motorcycle, Vicky asks Del to tutor her in math. He is helpful and she kisses him. While Dugan is initially alright with Del posing as Vicky’s boyfriend, he becomes jealous seeing the two of them dancing on the show. Dugan confronts Del, saying she belongs to him and that Del will only break her heart. Rather than get into a fistfight, the two try to out dance each other. After Gail Goren stars in the school drama club’s production of The Mikado, Gail’s family and friends go out for a celebratory dinner. Del brings Vicky as his date, but she feels awkward and dumb compared to Del’s other friends. She rushes out of the party upset. Del chases after her but cannot catch her before she leaves. A few days later, Vicky comes to Del’s high school to tell him goodbye. She and Dugan are leaving for Hollywood in a few hours. Del tries to talk her out of going, but Vicky believes that if she stays and they start dating for real, Del will only come to resent her. Knowing she is right, Del offers to pose as her date again to help Vicky and Dugan get a head start before her father realizes she is gone. That afternoon, Vicky and Del dance in the “Lover’s Spotlight,” while Perry learns the station will be immediately cancelling his show, replacing it on Monday with the live feed of the Psychedelic Shack music program from San Francisco, California. Perry has a breakdown on camera and the station manager cuts off the show mid-broadcast. That night, when Del learns the family car is in the shop, he takes Gail’s father’s new Cadillac to pick up Vicky. As Dugan rides his motorcycle to their appointed rendezvous, a policeman spots him and radios the station. Del gives Dugan some money for the trip and Vicky gives Del a passionate goodbye kiss. Suddenly sirens roar as police race down the street to arrest Dugan. Vicky and Dugan ride off on his motorcycle while Del drives the Cadillac in front of the police car to block its path. The police car crashes into the Cadillac while Vicky and Dugan safely escape. The following Monday, Gail comes over to console Del about the show’s cancellation and Vicky’s leaving. She shows him a copy of singer-songwriter Bob Dylan’s Highway 61 Revisted album and introduces him to a new type of music.
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Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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