The Man Who Came Back (1931)

81 or 85 mins | Drama | 11 January 1931

Director:

Raoul Walsh

Writer:

Edwin Burke

Cinematographer:

Arthur Edeson

Editor:

Harold Schuster

Production Company:

Fox Film Corp.
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HISTORY

The novel on which the film is based was first published as a short story in American Mercury in Nov 1912. According to an Apr 1930 FD news item, Humphrey Bogart was originally signed to a role in the film. Although an ad in FD in May 1930 noted that the film was to be "photographed throughout in color," the released film was black and white. The ad also listed Louise Huntington in the cast, but her appearance in the final film is doubtful. According to modern sources, director Frank Borzage, who was originally scheduled to direct this picture, was taken off the film after his previous picture, Liliom flopped. A Spanish-language version, Del infierno al cielo was also produced in 1931. The Man Who Came Back was also dubbed into German, Italian, French and Japanese. An earlier production based on the same source was the 1924 Fox film The Man Who Came Back , directed by Emmett Flynn and starring George O'Brien and Dorothy ... More Less

The novel on which the film is based was first published as a short story in American Mercury in Nov 1912. According to an Apr 1930 FD news item, Humphrey Bogart was originally signed to a role in the film. Although an ad in FD in May 1930 noted that the film was to be "photographed throughout in color," the released film was black and white. The ad also listed Louise Huntington in the cast, but her appearance in the final film is doubtful. According to modern sources, director Frank Borzage, who was originally scheduled to direct this picture, was taken off the film after his previous picture, Liliom flopped. A Spanish-language version, Del infierno al cielo was also produced in 1931. The Man Who Came Back was also dubbed into German, Italian, French and Japanese. An earlier production based on the same source was the 1924 Fox film The Man Who Came Back , directed by Emmett Flynn and starring George O'Brien and Dorothy MacKaill. More Less

BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
EHW
20 Nov 30
p. 40.
Film Daily
13 Apr 30
p. 5.
Film Daily
27 May 30
p. 27.
Film Daily
4 Jan 31
p. 10.
HF
22 Nov 31
p. 24.
Motion Picture Herald
3 Jan 31
p. 74.
New York Times
3 Jan 31
p. 21.
Variety
7 Jan 31
p. 22.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTOR
WRITERS
Contr wrt
Contr wrt
Contr wrt
Contr wrt
PHOTOGRAPHY
Photog
ART DIRECTOR
Settings
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
COSTUMES
SOUND
PRODUCTION MISC
Prod mgr
STAND INS
Stand-in for Janet Gaynor
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the novel The Man Who Came Back by John Fleming Wilson (New York, 1912) and the play of the same title by Jules Eckert Goodman (New York, 2 Sep 1916).
DETAILS
Alternate Titles:
Camino del infierno
Del infierno al cielo
Regeneración
Raoul Walsh's The Man Who Came Back
Release Date:
11 January 1931
Production Date:
13 October--late November 1930
Copyright Claimant:
Fox Film Corp.
Copyright Date:
13 December 1930
Copyright Number:
LP1845
Physical Properties:
Sound
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
81 or 85
Length(in feet):
7,786
Length(in reels):
11
Country:
United States
SYNOPSIS

New York millionaire Thomas Randolph becomes furious when he learns that his spoiled, wastrel son Stephen has been involved in yet another highly publicized scandal. This incident, coupled with Stephen's reckless financial handlings, prompts Thomas to cut off his support and force him to work for a living. Stephen rejects his father's decision that he work at his San Francisco shipping company, and instead falls in love with Angie, a San Francisco cabaret singer who promises to follow him wherever he goes. When Stephen threatens to soil the Randolph name and never return if his father cuts him off, Thomas decides to teach his son a lesson by having him shanghaied and taken to China. Four months later, Stephen runs into Angie in a Chinese drug den, known in Shanghai as "Slackjaw Palace," where Angie pretends to be high on dope, unable to recognize him. Stephen tries to strangle Angie in order to get her to stop her drug habit, and they soon resume their romance. One year later, Stephen and Angie, living in Hawaii, are visited by Captain Trevelyan, a mutual acquaintance who appears to have developed a fondness for Angie. In the hope that Angie will leave Stephen when she learns that her sweetheart has returned to his alcoholic ways, Trevelyan tells her that he has seen Stephen on a drinking jag. While Angie feigns drug addiction to test Stephen's resolve to love her, Stephen's aunt arrives with news that his father is ill, forcing him to choose between staying by Angie's side, and going to his father's sickbed. After some deliberation, Stephen decides to stay with Angie. When Thomas ... +


New York millionaire Thomas Randolph becomes furious when he learns that his spoiled, wastrel son Stephen has been involved in yet another highly publicized scandal. This incident, coupled with Stephen's reckless financial handlings, prompts Thomas to cut off his support and force him to work for a living. Stephen rejects his father's decision that he work at his San Francisco shipping company, and instead falls in love with Angie, a San Francisco cabaret singer who promises to follow him wherever he goes. When Stephen threatens to soil the Randolph name and never return if his father cuts him off, Thomas decides to teach his son a lesson by having him shanghaied and taken to China. Four months later, Stephen runs into Angie in a Chinese drug den, known in Shanghai as "Slackjaw Palace," where Angie pretends to be high on dope, unable to recognize him. Stephen tries to strangle Angie in order to get her to stop her drug habit, and they soon resume their romance. One year later, Stephen and Angie, living in Hawaii, are visited by Captain Trevelyan, a mutual acquaintance who appears to have developed a fondness for Angie. In the hope that Angie will leave Stephen when she learns that her sweetheart has returned to his alcoholic ways, Trevelyan tells her that he has seen Stephen on a drinking jag. While Angie feigns drug addiction to test Stephen's resolve to love her, Stephen's aunt arrives with news that his father is ill, forcing him to choose between staying by Angie's side, and going to his father's sickbed. After some deliberation, Stephen decides to stay with Angie. When Thomas decides that Stephen has learned his lesson, he summons him back to New York with a promise that he will take him into his firm, but only on the condition that he and Angie remain apart. Later, Thomas informs his son that he has had Angie watched while he was away, and tells him that she has left Honolulu with Captain Trevelyan. At that moment, Trevelyan and Angie enter and Thomas explains that he was satisfied with Angie's conduct under Trevelyan's surveillence, so he brought her over to be with Stephen. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.