Week Ends Only (1932)

64-65 or 70 mins | Drama | 19 June 1932

Director:

Alan Crosland

Cinematographer:

Hal Mohr

Editor:

Louis Loeffler

Production Designer:

Gordon Wiles

Production Company:

Fox Film Corp.
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HISTORY

Warner Fabian's novel was originally published serially in Illustrated Love Magazine , Nov 1931--Apr 1932. According to information in the Twentieth Century-Fox Records of the Legal Department at the UCLA Theater Arts Library, because the Hays Office objected to the use of the title of the novel in the advertising and credits of the film, the author consented that the credit would read, "From the novel by Warner Fabian." According to the MPAA/PCA files at the AMPAS Library, Darryl Zanuck , chief executive in charge of production at Warner Bros. and First National, was upset because of the similarity between the title of this film and that of First National's Week-End Marriage . MPH credits Alan Dinehart as playing a "broker" in this film, and his name appears in an early advertising billing sheet in the legal records, but he was not in the final film. According to the legal records, artist Henry Clive, who served as technical advisor, completed four portraits of Joan Bennett for use in the film. In the opening sequence, before the stock market crash, two animated stick figures dance on a ticker tape machine and up the emerging tape; after the crash, figures in dark top hats walk dejectedly down the tape and pull the machine crashing to the floor. According to correspondence in the MPAA/PCA files, Twentieth Century-Fox applied for certification for this film for reissue in Oct 1935. Joseph Breen of the Hays Office responded that because the film contained "considerable suggestiveness of loose living" and that "the entire theme of the play is not good," the company should withdraw their ... More Less

Warner Fabian's novel was originally published serially in Illustrated Love Magazine , Nov 1931--Apr 1932. According to information in the Twentieth Century-Fox Records of the Legal Department at the UCLA Theater Arts Library, because the Hays Office objected to the use of the title of the novel in the advertising and credits of the film, the author consented that the credit would read, "From the novel by Warner Fabian." According to the MPAA/PCA files at the AMPAS Library, Darryl Zanuck , chief executive in charge of production at Warner Bros. and First National, was upset because of the similarity between the title of this film and that of First National's Week-End Marriage . MPH credits Alan Dinehart as playing a "broker" in this film, and his name appears in an early advertising billing sheet in the legal records, but he was not in the final film. According to the legal records, artist Henry Clive, who served as technical advisor, completed four portraits of Joan Bennett for use in the film. In the opening sequence, before the stock market crash, two animated stick figures dance on a ticker tape machine and up the emerging tape; after the crash, figures in dark top hats walk dejectedly down the tape and pull the machine crashing to the floor. According to correspondence in the MPAA/PCA files, Twentieth Century-Fox applied for certification for this film for reissue in Oct 1935. Joseph Breen of the Hays Office responded that because the film contained "considerable suggestiveness of loose living" and that "the entire theme of the play is not good," the company should withdraw their application. More Less

BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Film Daily
18 Jun 32
p. 4.
HF
16 Apr 32
p. 8.
HF
7 May 32
p. 8.
International Photographer
1 Jul 32
p. 29.
Motion Picture Herald
11 Jun 32
p. 29.
New York Times
18 Jun 32
p. 9.
Variety
21 Jun 32
p. 15.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
WRITERS
Contr wrt
Contr wrt
PHOTOGRAPHY
Photog
Cam op
Asst cam
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
COSTUMES
Ward
MUSIC
PRODUCTION MISC
Tech adv
Still photog
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the novel Week-End Girl by Warner Fabian (New York, 1932).
SONGS
"Am I Too Fresh," words and music by James F. Hanley.
COMPOSER
DETAILS
Release Date:
19 June 1932
Premiere Information:
New York opening: 17 June 1932
Production Date:
11 April--early or mid May 1932
Copyright Claimant:
Fox Film Corp.
Copyright Date:
31 May 1932
Copyright Number:
LP3082
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric System
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
64-65 or 70
Length(in feet):
6,245
Length(in reels):
7
Country:
United States
SYNOPSIS

After her wealthy father goes broke and dies following the stock market crash, former debutante Venetia Carr cannot find a job. Her friend and former butler, Martin, who did not have his money in stocks, then hires her as a hostess at his speakeasy, the most exclusive in New York. When Arthur Ladden, a rich older patron, invites Venetia to his chateau in the mountains for his weekend houseparty, she accepts under her terms: that she is obliged only to act as a hostess. As she returns in the morning to her modest room, she spies a neighbor stealing a bottle of milk outside her door. The man, Jack Williams, a struggling artist, appeals to Venetia's sense of humor, and she invites him to breakfast. Although Venetia evades Ladden's attempted intimacies at the chateau, he hires her for the rest of the summer weekends. With her newly earned money, Venetia decides to buy secretly some of Jack's artwork, and she sends Martin to purchase a picture for $150. Happy that he now does not have to look for work, Jack begins a portrait of Venetia to enter in a competition from which he could win a trip to Europe to study and $2,000. During their sessions together, Jack and Venetia fall in love. After Jack runs out of money again, Martin sends his bartender and later his washroom attendant to purchase drawings. When Ladden sees Jack's work hanging in Martin's office and learns that Venetia has been helping the artist, he suspects a rival and arranges for Jack to come to his chateau on a Sunday, ostensibly to paint murals for his aquarium. When ... +


After her wealthy father goes broke and dies following the stock market crash, former debutante Venetia Carr cannot find a job. Her friend and former butler, Martin, who did not have his money in stocks, then hires her as a hostess at his speakeasy, the most exclusive in New York. When Arthur Ladden, a rich older patron, invites Venetia to his chateau in the mountains for his weekend houseparty, she accepts under her terms: that she is obliged only to act as a hostess. As she returns in the morning to her modest room, she spies a neighbor stealing a bottle of milk outside her door. The man, Jack Williams, a struggling artist, appeals to Venetia's sense of humor, and she invites him to breakfast. Although Venetia evades Ladden's attempted intimacies at the chateau, he hires her for the rest of the summer weekends. With her newly earned money, Venetia decides to buy secretly some of Jack's artwork, and she sends Martin to purchase a picture for $150. Happy that he now does not have to look for work, Jack begins a portrait of Venetia to enter in a competition from which he could win a trip to Europe to study and $2,000. During their sessions together, Jack and Venetia fall in love. After Jack runs out of money again, Martin sends his bartender and later his washroom attendant to purchase drawings. When Ladden sees Jack's work hanging in Martin's office and learns that Venetia has been helping the artist, he suspects a rival and arranges for Jack to come to his chateau on a Sunday, ostensibly to paint murals for his aquarium. When Jack arrives, he sees Venetia with Ladden and hears a drunk call her Ladden's mistress. Believing the drunk, Jack leaves and changes the portrait so that Venetia appears half-naked with a devil over her shoulder offering her jewelry. When he tells her he will enter the new picture in the competition, Venetia says she never wants to see him again. Jack wins the competition and plans to sail for Europe, while Venetia accepts Ladden's offer to accompany him to Europe. On the evening they are to leave, Jack goes to Martin's club, where he recognizes the washroom attendant, bartender and then Martin himself as the men who bought his work. When Martin tells Jack that Venetia put up the money to buy his work and that she is only going with Ladden to forget him, Martin rushes to the boat, where he embraces Venetia. Seeing this, Ladden, graciously leaves them alone. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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