The Producers (2005)

PG-13 | 127 mins | Musical comedy | 2005

THIS TITLE IS OUTSIDE THE AFI CATALOG OF FEATURE FILMS (1893-1993)
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Director:

Susan Stroman

Cinematographers:

John Bailey, Charles Minsky

Editor:

Steven Weisberg

Production Designer:

Mark Friedberg

Production Companies:

Universal Pictures , Columbia Pictures, Brooksfilms
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HISTORY

End credits include the following written statements: “The name ‘Village People’ and the trade-dress of the Village People are registered trademarks, used by permission of Can’t Stop Productions, Inc. and Scorpio Music S.A. Archive Films by Getty Images.” Also in the end credits, producers thank the following individuals and organizations: Mayor’s Office of Film, Theatre, and Broadcasting; The New York State Governor’s Office for Motion Picture & Television Development; Rocco Landesman; Richard Frankel Productions, Inc.; Laura Green; F. Richard Pappas; Management and Crew of the St. James Theatre, owned and operated by Jujamcyn Theaters; Brooklyn Academy of Music – Howard Gilman Opera House, Brooklyn, NY; Cora Cahan and the New 42nd Street Studios; and The Central Park Conservancy.
       According to a 14 Mar 2005 Var article, The Producers marked a return to feature film production for Mel Brooks after a ten-year hiatus. The film was based on the 2001 Broadway musical version of Brooks’ 1968 film, The Producers (see entry). As noted in a 6 Nov 2005 NYT article, the stage musical had grossed $500 million worldwide to that time. Brooks explained his motivation to produce a film version of the musical in a 6 Nov 2005 LAT article, saying it was, in part, to immortalize the “remarkable” stage performances of Nathan Lane, Matthew Broderick, Gary Beach, and Roger Bart. Remarking on the impermanence of theater, Brooks said, “If you make a movie, it’s there forever.”
       In a 16 Dec 2005 interview in DV, Brooks stated that he once worked as an “office boy” for an Off Broadway producer in the 1940s. In 1966, he wrote ... More Less

End credits include the following written statements: “The name ‘Village People’ and the trade-dress of the Village People are registered trademarks, used by permission of Can’t Stop Productions, Inc. and Scorpio Music S.A. Archive Films by Getty Images.” Also in the end credits, producers thank the following individuals and organizations: Mayor’s Office of Film, Theatre, and Broadcasting; The New York State Governor’s Office for Motion Picture & Television Development; Rocco Landesman; Richard Frankel Productions, Inc.; Laura Green; F. Richard Pappas; Management and Crew of the St. James Theatre, owned and operated by Jujamcyn Theaters; Brooklyn Academy of Music – Howard Gilman Opera House, Brooklyn, NY; Cora Cahan and the New 42nd Street Studios; and The Central Park Conservancy.
       According to a 14 Mar 2005 Var article, The Producers marked a return to feature film production for Mel Brooks after a ten-year hiatus. The film was based on the 2001 Broadway musical version of Brooks’ 1968 film, The Producers (see entry). As noted in a 6 Nov 2005 NYT article, the stage musical had grossed $500 million worldwide to that time. Brooks explained his motivation to produce a film version of the musical in a 6 Nov 2005 LAT article, saying it was, in part, to immortalize the “remarkable” stage performances of Nathan Lane, Matthew Broderick, Gary Beach, and Roger Bart. Remarking on the impermanence of theater, Brooks said, “If you make a movie, it’s there forever.”
       In a 16 Dec 2005 interview in DV, Brooks stated that he once worked as an “office boy” for an Off Broadway producer in the 1940s. In 1966, he wrote the screenplay for The Producers (1968, see entry), and based the character of “Max Bialystock” on his former employer, who raised more money than he needed for shows and kept the excess funds after they failed; like Max Bialystock, Brooks said the producer also exchanged sex for investments from older women.
       As noted in a 23 Dec 2004 DV brief, Nicole Kidman was originally set to play “Ulla,” but dropped out in early Dec 2004 due to scheduling conflicts.
       A 29 Sep 2004 HR news item reported that principal photography would begin 21 Feb 2005, with a seventy-day shooting schedule. According to 8 Mar 2005 HR production charts, however, the start date was delayed one week to 28 Feb 2005. The film was the first to be shot at the fifteen-acre Steiner Studios in Brooklyn, NY, as stated in the 14 Mar 2005 Var. In addition to Steiner Studios, exteriors were shot in Manhattan’s Central Park and the area outside the Plaza Hotel.
       According to a 10 Mar 2005 DV item, the production cost upwards of $55 million. U.S. distributor Universal Pictures provided funding along with Sony Pictures Entertainment, and filmmakers were set to receive a NY state and city tax credit which would return 10% of the production costs, with the requirement that 75% of the production budget be spent in NY.
       A 6 Feb 2005 LAT brief announced that those who wanted to appear as audience members on the opening night of Springtime for Hitler could pay between $250 and $2,000, with the money going to a NY-based charity called FoodChange. The paying background actors would join union extras for a day of filming on 14 Mar 2005 at the St. James Theater on Broadway, where the stage version of the musical first opened.
       For the role of “Leo Bloom,” Matthew Broderick received the Hollywood Film Festival’s “Hollywood Supporting Actor of the Year Award.” At the 49th Annual Grammy Awards, Mel Brooks was nominated for “Best Song Written for Motion Picture, Television, or Other Visual Media” for the song, “There’s Nothing Like A Show On Broadway.” The film was also nominated for the following Golden Globe awards: Best Performance by an Actor in a Motion Picture – Comedy or Musical (Nathan Lane); Best Performance by an Actor in a Supporting Role in a Motion Picture (Will Ferrell); and Best Original Song – Motion Picture (“There’s Nothing Like A Show On Broadway”).
       The Producers marked Susan Stroman’s feature film directorial debut.
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GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
23 Dec 2004.
---
Daily Variety
10 Mar 2005.
---
Daily Variety
16 Dec 2005
p. 35.
Hollywood Reporter
29 Sep 2004
p. 1, 18.
Hollywood Reporter
8 Mar 2005.
---
Los Angeles Times
6 Feb 2005
Section E, p. 43.
Los Angeles Times
6 Nov 2005
Section E, p. 25.
Los Angeles Times
16 Dec 2005
p. 1.
New York Times
6 Nov 2005.
---
New York Times
16 Dec 2005
p. 10.
Variety
14 Mar 2005
p. 6, 8.
Variety
12 Dec 2005
p. 48, 54.
CAST
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
First nighters:
[and]
Accountants:
Girls with pearls:
Little old ladies:
Auditioners:
Bavarian peasants:
Showgirls:
[and]
Tapping brown shirts:
Stormtroopers:
Tom Walker
Samba band:
Convicts:
Prisoners of Love dancers:
+
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
A Brooksfilms production
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Unit prod mgr
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
2d 2d asst dir
Addl 2d asst dir
DGA trainee
PRODUCERS
Prod
Co-prod
Assoc prod
WRITERS
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Dir of photog
Theatrical lighting des
Theatrical lighting des
Cam op
1st asst cam
1st asst cam
2d asst cam
2d asst cam
Still photog
Chief lighting tech
New York gaffer
Best boy elec
Rigging gaffer
Rigging best boy
Best boy grip
Dolly grip
Dolly grip
Key rigging grip
Best boy rigging grip
Video playback
Videographer
Orig Broadway lighting des
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des
Art dir
Asst art dir
Asst art dir
Asst art dir
Asst art dir
Asst art dir
Asst art dir
Asst art dir
Graphic des
Art dept coord
Art dept res
FILM EDITORS
Addl film ed
AVID asst ed
Asst ed
Apprentice ed
Ed prod asst
Negative cutter
SET DECORATORS
Springtime for Hitler set des
Prop master
Const coord
Key shopcraftsman
Key shopcraft foreman
Key const grip
Key best boy const grip
Standby const grip
Shop elec
Shop prod asst
Scenic change
Scenic foreman
Standby scenic artist
Shop person
Asst set dec
Set dec coord
Leadman
On set dresser
Key greensman
Asst prop master
Asst props
Orig Broadway set des
Broadway prop master
COSTUMES
Asst cost des
Asst cost des
Cost supv
Cost supv
Key cost
Key cost
Mr. Lane's cost
Mr. Broderick's cost
Mr. Ferrell's cost
Asst tailor
Ward coord
Asst to William Ivey Long
Cost shop mgr
Orig Broadway cost des
Broadway ward supv
MUSIC
Mus and lyrics
Mus cond and supv
Mus prod
Underscore
Supv mus ed
Mus rec & mixed
Mus prod supv
Mus ed
Mus ed
Mus vocal ed
Asst mus ed
Asst mus ed
Addl orch
Addl score orch
Vocal arr
Dance & incidental mus arr
Addl dance arr
Orch contractor
Mus rec
Mus preparation
Mus mixed at
Rehearsal drummer
SOUND
Sd des
Prod mixer
Boom op
Sd utility
24 track eng
Playback op
Supv sd ed
Key asst sd ed
Dial ed
Dial ed
Sd eff ed
Sd eff ed
Sd eff ed
Sd eff ed
Asst sd ed
Asst sd ed
Supv ADR ed
ADR mixer
ADR mixer
Foley ed
Foley artist
Foley mixer
Addl mixer
Mix rec
Re-rec sd mixer
Re-rec sd mixer
Orig Broadway sd des
Dolby sd consultant
Sd services provided by
VISUAL EFFECTS
Pigeon puppet tech
Pigeon puppet tech
Creative supv
Animatronics prod
Puppet fabricator
Animatronics coord
Lead puppeteer
Pigeon puppeteer
Pigeon puppeteer
Pigeon puppeteer
Pigeon puppeteer
Pigeon puppeteer
Pigeon puppeteer
Pigeon puppeteer
Pigeon puppeteer
Pigeon puppeteer
Spec eff supv
Spec eff foreman
Visual eff supv
Creature eff by
Visual eff by
CG supv, Giant Killer Robots
Look/Lighting artist, Giant Killer Robots
Look/Lighting artist, Giant Killer Robots
Matte painter, Giant Killer Robots
Compositor, Giant Killer Robots
Digital eff created by
Digital eff supv, New Deal Studios, Inc.
Digital prod, New Deal Studios, Inc.
Matte painter, New Deal Studios, Inc.
Digital artist, New Deal Studios, Inc.
Digital artist, New Deal Studios, Inc.
Digital eff created by
Visual eff supv, Look Effects, Inc.
Visual eff prod, Look Effects, Inc.
Visual eff coord, Look Effects, Inc.
Visual eff supv, Technicolor Creative Services
Lead compositor, Technicolor Creative Services
Digital matte painter, Technicolor Creative Servic
End title seq des and prod by
Des, Big Film Design
Des, Big Film Design
DANCE
Choreog
Assoc choreog
Asst choreog
Asst choreog
Rehearsal dance supv
Dance asst
Dance asst
Dance asst
MAKEUP
Makeup des
Dept head make-up
Spec eff make-up artist
Mr. Ferrell's make-up & hair
Ms. Thurman's make-up
Hair styles
Dept head hair
Key hair stylist
Wigmaker
Addl wig des
Orig Broadway wig des
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
Post prod supv
Scr supv
Prod coord
Asst prod coord
Prod secy
Prod controller
Prod accountant
Post prod accountant
1st asst accountant
2d asst accountant
Payroll accountant
Const accountant
Brooksworks accountant
Loc mgr
Asst loc mgr
Prod stage mgr
Theatrical stage mgr
Loc asst
Parking coord
Picture car coord
Unit pub
EPK prod
Post prod asst
Asst to Ms. Stroman
Asst to Ms. Stroman
Assoc to Mr. Brooks
Asst to Mr. Brooks
Asst to Mr. Brooks
Asst to Mr. Sanger
Asst to Mr. Lane
Asst to Mr. Broderick
Asst to Mr. Ferrell
Asst to Ms. Thurman
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Craft services
On set medic
Physical therapy provided by
Tara Rubin casting assoc
Background casting
Background casting assoc
Transportation capt
Co-capt
Prod of the Broadway play
Prod of the Broadway play
Prod of the Broadway play
Prod of the Broadway play
Prod of the Broadway play
Prod of the Broadway play
Prod of the Broadway play
Prod of the Broadway play
Prod of the Broadway play
Prod of the Broadway play
Projectionist
Dailies consultant
Magless dailies systems
Payroll services provided by
Atmosphere payroll services by
Insurance company
Legal services provided by
Addl legal services provided by
Marketing consultant
Completion guarantee provided by
STAND INS
Stunt coord
Stunt performer
Stunt performer
Stunt performer
Mr. Lane's stand in
Mr. Broderick's stand in
Ms. Thurman's stand in
COLOR PERSONNEL
Digital intermediate consultant
Col timer
Digital intermediate
DI prod, EFilm
DI ed, EFilm
DI col timer, EFilm
DI color timer, EFilm
DI prod asst, EFilm
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the film The Producers written by Mel Brooks (Embassy Pictures Corporation, 1968) and the musical The Producers, the new Mel Brooks musical, book by Mel Brooks and Thomas Meehan, music and lyrics by Mel Brooks, direction and choreography by Susan Stroman (New York, 19 Apr 2001).
SONGS
"Opening Night," music and lyrics by Mel Brooks, performed by Bryn Dowling, Meg Gillentine, and Opening Nighters
"We Can Do It," music and lyrics by Mel Brooks, performed by Nathan Lane and Matthew Broderick
"I Wanna Be A Producer," music and lyrics by Mel Brooks, performed by Matthew Broderick, Accountants and Girls In Pearls
+
SONGS
"Opening Night," music and lyrics by Mel Brooks, performed by Bryn Dowling, Meg Gillentine, and Opening Nighters
"We Can Do It," music and lyrics by Mel Brooks, performed by Nathan Lane and Matthew Broderick
"I Wanna Be A Producer," music and lyrics by Mel Brooks, performed by Matthew Broderick, Accountants and Girls In Pearls
"Der Guten Tag Hop Clop," music and lyrics by Mel Brooks, performed by Nathan Lane, Matthew Broderick and Will Ferrell
"Keep It Gay," music and lyrics by Mel Brooks, performed by Gary Beach, Roger Bart, Nathan Lane, Matthew Broderick, Brent Barrett, Peter Bartlett, Jim Borstelmann and Kathy Fitzgerald
"When You Got It, Flaunt It," music and lyrics by Mel Brooks, performed by Uma Thurman
"That Face," music and lyrics by Mel Brooks, performed by Matthew Broderick and Uma Thurman
"Along Came Bialy," music and lyrics by Mel Brooks, performed by Nathan Lane and Little Old Ladies
"You Never Say Good Luck On Opening Night," music and lyrics by Mel Brooks, performed by Gary Beach, Roger Bart, Will Ferrell, Matthew Broderick and Nathan Lane
"Haben Sie Gehört Das Deutsche Band?," music and lyrics by Mel Brooks, performed by Will Ferrell
"Heil Myself," music and lyrics by Mel Brooks, performed by Gary Beach, Stormtroopers and Springtime Finale Chorus
"Springtime For Hitler," music and lyrics by Mel Brooks, performed by John Barrowman, Uma Thurman, Michael Thomas Holmes, Mel Brooks, Gary Beach, Bavarian Peasants, Brownshirts, Stormtroopers and Springtime Finale Chorus
"You'll Find Your Happiness In Rio," music and lyrics by Mel Brooks, performed by Samba Band
"Betrayed," music and lyrics by Mel Brooks, performed by Nathan Lane
"Prisoners of Love," music and lyrics by Mel Brooks, (Sing Sing) performed by Kevin Ligon, Jimmy Smagula, Will Ferrell, Nathan Lane, Matthew Broderick and Sing Sing Convicts, (Broadway) performed by Uma Thurman, Gary Beach and Broadway Prisoners, (Leo & Max) performed by Nathan Lane, Matthew Broderick and Finale Chorus
"'Til Him," music and lyrics by Mel Brooks, performed by Matthew Broderick, Nathan Lane and Little Old Ladies
"There's Nothing Like A Show On Broadway," music and lyrics by Mel Brooks, performed by Nathan Lane and Matthew Broderick
"The Hop-Clop Goes On," music and lyrics by Mel Brooks, performed by Will Ferrell
"Goodbye!" music and lyrics by Mel Brooks, performed by Matthew Broderick, Uma Thurman, Will Ferrell, Gary Beach, Roger Bart, Roger's Production Team, Nathan Lane, Accountants, Samba Band, Ray Wills, Marilyn Sokol, Michael McKean, Sing Sing Convicts, Stormtroopers, Jon Lovitz, Girls In Pearls and Mel Brooks.
+
COMPOSER
DETAILS
Release Date:
2005
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles and New York openings: 16 December 2005
Production Date:
began 28 February 2005 in New York City
Copyright Claimant:
Brooksworks, LLC
Copyright Date:
21 December 2005
Copyright Number:
PA1327439
Physical Properties:
Sound
Dolby Digital; SDDS Sony Dynamic Digital Sound; Digital dts Sound in selected theaters
Color
Deluxe Laboratories
Lenses/Prints
Filmed in Panavision® with Panavision cameras & lenses
Duration(in mins):
127
MPAA Rating:
PG-13
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
42240
SYNOPSIS

In 1959 New York City, Broadway producer Max Bialystock’s latest production, Funnyboy!, closes after one performance. At Max’s office, accountant Leo Bloom arrives to audit Max’s books, but Max shoves him into the bathroom when an “investor” knocks on the door. Max picks one of many framed pictures of elderly women out of a closet, places it above his fireplace, and invites the woman from the picture in. Embracing the woman, Max asks for a check, but she only gives it to him after they play a game in which she pretends to be a milkmaid and he pretends to be a “well-hung stable boy.” After the woman leaves, Max shows Leo his books, and Leo admits he has always had a secret desire to be a Broadway producer. Max tells Leo he has one minute to figure out Max’s financial problems, prompting Leo to panic and rub his face with an old baby blanket. When Max snaps up Leo’s coveted blanket, Leo screams, forbidding Max to touch it. Max coaxes Leo out of a hysterical fit by talking to him like a baby. After studying the ledger books, Leo tells Max there is $2,000 left over from the budget of Funnyboy! Max orders the accountant to alter the numbers to account for the remaining money, which he has spent on himself. Complaining about his recent failures, Max pleads with Leo to save him. Leo whimsically suggests that, under certain circumstances, Max could make more money with a failed show by keeping the unspent budget; since there are ... +


In 1959 New York City, Broadway producer Max Bialystock’s latest production, Funnyboy!, closes after one performance. At Max’s office, accountant Leo Bloom arrives to audit Max’s books, but Max shoves him into the bathroom when an “investor” knocks on the door. Max picks one of many framed pictures of elderly women out of a closet, places it above his fireplace, and invites the woman from the picture in. Embracing the woman, Max asks for a check, but she only gives it to him after they play a game in which she pretends to be a milkmaid and he pretends to be a “well-hung stable boy.” After the woman leaves, Max shows Leo his books, and Leo admits he has always had a secret desire to be a Broadway producer. Max tells Leo he has one minute to figure out Max’s financial problems, prompting Leo to panic and rub his face with an old baby blanket. When Max snaps up Leo’s coveted blanket, Leo screams, forbidding Max to touch it. Max coaxes Leo out of a hysterical fit by talking to him like a baby. After studying the ledger books, Leo tells Max there is $2,000 left over from the budget of Funnyboy! Max orders the accountant to alter the numbers to account for the remaining money, which he has spent on himself. Complaining about his recent failures, Max pleads with Leo to save him. Leo whimsically suggests that, under certain circumstances, Max could make more money with a failed show by keeping the unspent budget; since there are no profits with a failure, investors do not have to be paid back. Leo tells Max that by raising a very large budget but producing a show that is a “flop,” Max can become rich. Excited, Max suggests that he and Leo raise two million dollars, find the worst script in town, hire the worst director and actors, and produce a failure so that they can become millionaires. Unwilling to take the risk, Leo refuses to go along with Max’s scheme and returns to work. At Leo's busy accounting office, the meek accountant fantasizes about being a producer with a hit show on Broadway. When his boss, Mr. Marks, yells at him, Leo quits, announcing that he is going to be a producer. Sometime later, as Leo and Max read scripts, Max discovers a musical called Springtime for Hitler: A Gay Romp with Adolf and Eva at Berchtesgaden and declares that it is a certain flop. The two rush out to meet the writer, Franz Liebkind, who immediately denies participation in the Nazi party. However, Liebkind is excited to learn that they want to produce his play and reports the news to his pet carrier pigeons. After the producers agree to dance Adolf Hitler’s favorite German dance, wear Nazi armbands, and swear an oath to respect Hitler’s memory, Liebkind finally signs the contract. Still wearing the Nazi armbands, Leo and Max rush to the home of the effeminate Broadway director, Roger DeBris. There, DeBris’s “common-law assistant,” Carmen Ghia, takes their coats and leads them to the director, who is dressed as the grand duchess Anastasia for a costume ball that evening. DeBris tells Max he read Springtime for Hitler and thought it was great, but cannot direct it because all Broadway shows should be light and gay. He introduces Leo and Max to his creative team: a leather-clad set designer named Brian; an effeminate costume designer named Kevin; the choreographer, Scott, who has a bulging erection underneath his tights; and the lighting designer, a masculine woman named Shirley Markowitz. Max says DeBris has always been associated with frivolous entertainment and should do something serious so that he can win a Tony award. Thrilled at the mention of a Tony, DeBris agrees to direct. Max and Leo return to Max’s office, where Ulla, a beautiful Swedish actress, shows up for a nonexistent casting call. Mesmerized by her beauty, Max invites Ulla to audition with a song and dance, and she performs a number titled, “When You Got It, Flaunt It.” Max tells her she can have a role in their show, and hires her to work as an office assistant in the meantime. In order to raise the money for Springtime for Hitler, Max solicits a slew of sex-starved elderly women, who invest in the musical in exchange for sex. Alone with Leo in the office, Ulla confesses her affections for Leo, but he becomes nervous when she gets too close. At auditions for the musical, a frustrated Liebkind demonstrates to one of the actors how he should dance and sing as “Adolf Hitler,” inspiring Max to cast Liebkind in the role. Before opening night, Max notices Ulla and Leo kissing passionately. Afterward, Leo assures Max that he and Ulla have gone no further than “hugs and kisses.” Leo tells DeBris “good luck” but is reprimanded because DeBris believes the superstition that it is bad luck to say “good luck” in a theater. DeBris suggests that Leo say “break a leg,” instead. Wanting the show to fail, Max tells passing chorus girls “good luck” and walks underneath a ladder, which will also bring bad luck, according to a similar superstition. When Liebkind actually falls down a set of stairs and breaks his leg, DeBris agrees to perform the role of Adolf Hitler, himself. Although audience members are initially appalled at the show’s opening number, a happy song about Nazism, they laugh when DeBris appears as Hitler, behaving in a flamboyantly effeminate manner. The show is a success. DeBris and Carmen Ghia come to celebrate at Max’s office. Liebkind arrives, wielding a gun and hobbling around on crutches, upset that DeBris has made a mockery of Hitler. Firing his gun wildly, Liebkind finally tries to shoot himself, but the gun has run out of bullets. Max encourages Liebkind to kill the actors so the show will be cancelled, but Leo discourages it. Police arrive and chase Liebkind, who breaks his other leg in an attempt to flee. Having arrested Liebkind, they spot Max’s accounting ledgers and arrest him, as well. Ulla stops by the office later and finds Leo hiding behind the door. He tells her Max was arrested, and Ulla suggests she and Leo steal the two million dollars in Max’s safe and flee to Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. In jail, Max receives a postcard from Rio de Janeiro and learns that Leo and Ulla are having a luxurious retreat. Max is outraged that Leo betrayed him. At his trial, Max is found “incredibly guilty.” To his surprise, Leo and Ulla appear to help Max clear his name. Leo tells the judge that Max has made him feel valuable. So as not to split up the two men, the judge sentences them both to five years at “Sing Sing” prison, along with Liebkind. At Sing Sing, Leo, Max, and Liebkind work on a new musical, Prisoners of Love. The governor pardons Leo and Max for bringing relief to the other prisoners through song and dance. Prisoners of Love, starring DeBris and Ulla, opens to rave reviews, and Leo and Max go on to produce several more hit shows. +

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Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.