Sailor's Luck (1933)

78 mins | Romantic comedy | 10 March 1933

Director:

Raoul Walsh

Cinematographer:

Arthur Miller

Editor:

Jack Murray

Production Designer:

Joseph C. Wright

Production Company:

Fox Film Corp.
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HISTORY

Before production began, the title of this film was changed from Sailor's Luck to Bad Boy ; however, during production, the title Sailor's Luck was reinstituted. Frank Moran was an ex-boxer. Although the character played by Victor Jory is listed as "Baron Darrow" in the screen credits and in reviews, dialogue in the film and a sign appearing in the film call him "Baron Portolo." VarB notes, "A new dissolve is used which is a cross between a corkscrew and an iris. Novel, but used too frequently in the earlier scenes." According to DV , a suit was filed by author Walter S. Lawrence, who charged infringement of copyright. He claimed that essential parts of his book The Marathon Dancer , which he submitted to the studio in 1932, were used in the film. According to information in the Twentieth Century-Fox Records of the Legal Department at the UCLA Theater Arts Library, Fox's demurrer to the complaint was sustained, and the suit was ... More Less

Before production began, the title of this film was changed from Sailor's Luck to Bad Boy ; however, during production, the title Sailor's Luck was reinstituted. Frank Moran was an ex-boxer. Although the character played by Victor Jory is listed as "Baron Darrow" in the screen credits and in reviews, dialogue in the film and a sign appearing in the film call him "Baron Portolo." VarB notes, "A new dissolve is used which is a cross between a corkscrew and an iris. Novel, but used too frequently in the earlier scenes." According to DV , a suit was filed by author Walter S. Lawrence, who charged infringement of copyright. He claimed that essential parts of his book The Marathon Dancer , which he submitted to the studio in 1932, were used in the film. According to information in the Twentieth Century-Fox Records of the Legal Department at the UCLA Theater Arts Library, Fox's demurrer to the complaint was sustained, and the suit was dismissed. More Less

BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
11 May 34
p. 2.
Film Daily
13 Feb 33
p. 5.
Film Daily
17 Mar 33
p. 6.
HF
4 Feb 33
p. 12.
International Photographer
1 Feb 33
p. 21.
Motion Picture Daily
17 Mar 33
p. 8.
Motion Picture Herald
25 Mar 33
p. 24.
New York Times
17 Mar 33
p. 21.
VarB
24-Feb-33
---
Variety
21 Mar 33
p. 27.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
Raoul Walsh Production
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
WRITERS
Story and scr
Story and scr
Addl dial
Addl dial
PHOTOGRAPHY
Photog
Asst cam
ART DIRECTOR
FILM EDITOR
COSTUMES
MUSIC
Mus dir
PRODUCTION MISC
SOURCES
SONGS
"A Sailor's Luck," music by Val Burton and Will Jason, lyrics by Ben Ryan.
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
Bad Boy
Release Date:
10 March 1933
Production Date:
12 January--early February 1933
Copyright Claimant:
Fox Film Corp.
Copyright Date:
25 February 1933
Copyright Number:
LP3701
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric System
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
78
Length(in feet):
7,110
Length(in reels):
8-9
Country:
United States
SYNOPSIS

When the U.S.S. Missouri docks in San Pedro harbor, sailor Jimmy Harrigan makes a telephone call for his pals, Barnacle Benny Cohen and Bilge Moran, to their sweetheart, Minnie Broadhurst, who, on their last visit, broke a number of chairs over their heads. Instead of Minnie, Jimmy reaches twenty-one-year-old Sally Brent, who hangs up on him when she learns that he is a sailor. As the three sailors arrive at the boardinghouse where Minnie used to live, Sally, who must move unless she can pay her rent, is leaving to apply for a job at the nearby Crystal Pool. Jimmy follows her, chased by a banana seller whose merchandise was stolen and eaten by the sailors, and then by Benny and Bilge, who have been chased out of the boardinghouse because of the broken chairs. At the pool, Sally is immediately offered a job by the philandering owner, Nugent Busby. She slips into Busby's wife Mona's bathing suit and tries to teach Jimmy to swim, although she does not know how herself. Mona then enters, and in the ensuing uproar, a number of people are thrown into the pool fully dressed. Sally leaves before Jimmy, who later hitches a ride with the extremely besotted J. Felix Hemingway. After Jimmy spots Sally on the street, Hemingway takes them to dinner, during which she and Jimmy dance and get to know one another. Because Sally now has no place to stay, Jimmy rents a room for the night. Sally nervously avoids his advances and attempts to go after he kisses her, but instead Jimmy berates and spanks her for letting a ... +


When the U.S.S. Missouri docks in San Pedro harbor, sailor Jimmy Harrigan makes a telephone call for his pals, Barnacle Benny Cohen and Bilge Moran, to their sweetheart, Minnie Broadhurst, who, on their last visit, broke a number of chairs over their heads. Instead of Minnie, Jimmy reaches twenty-one-year-old Sally Brent, who hangs up on him when she learns that he is a sailor. As the three sailors arrive at the boardinghouse where Minnie used to live, Sally, who must move unless she can pay her rent, is leaving to apply for a job at the nearby Crystal Pool. Jimmy follows her, chased by a banana seller whose merchandise was stolen and eaten by the sailors, and then by Benny and Bilge, who have been chased out of the boardinghouse because of the broken chairs. At the pool, Sally is immediately offered a job by the philandering owner, Nugent Busby. She slips into Busby's wife Mona's bathing suit and tries to teach Jimmy to swim, although she does not know how herself. Mona then enters, and in the ensuing uproar, a number of people are thrown into the pool fully dressed. Sally leaves before Jimmy, who later hitches a ride with the extremely besotted J. Felix Hemingway. After Jimmy spots Sally on the street, Hemingway takes them to dinner, during which she and Jimmy dance and get to know one another. Because Sally now has no place to stay, Jimmy rents a room for the night. Sally nervously avoids his advances and attempts to go after he kisses her, but instead Jimmy berates and spanks her for letting a guy get her a room and leaves himself. The next morning, he returns with food and, after a couple of kisses and a confession that he loves her, leaves for his boat, promising to return that evening. Jimmy's ship, however, sails for San Francisco, and he is unable to inform Sally. Meanwhile, Sally evades the persistent advances of the owner of the apartments, Baron Portolo, who offers to let her win the first prize of $1,000 at the upcoming dance marathon that he is promoting. She also agrees to babysit for Junior, the son of Elmer Brown, who lives down the hall. That night, when Jimmy calls from San Francisco, Portolo speaks into the phone, and Jimmy hangs up thinking Sally is cheating on him. The next day, Jimmy returns and rushes to the apartment with presents of women's undergarments to apologize, but when he sees Brown in a robe leaving Sally's apartment, he insults her and rips the undergarments to pieces. Stung sharply, Sally agrees to enter the marathon. Jimmy, meanwhile, learns that Sally told him the truth about babysitting for Junior. When he hears Portolo over the radio announce Sally's entrance in the marathon, Jimmy runs to the dance hall, where he is thrown out by Portolo's gang. He climbs a tree and crashes through a window to get in again, and after taking the willing Sally away from her partner, socks Portolo and sets off a riotous fight between sailors and the gang. In their departing cab, Jimmy slips a wedding ring on Sally's finger, and they kiss as each grabs the other's hair tightly. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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