Amos & Andrew (1993)

PG-13 | 107 mins | Comedy | 5 March 1993

Director:

E. Max Frye

Writer:

E. Max Frye

Producer:

Gary Goetzman

Cinematographer:

Walt Lloyd

Editor:

Jane Kurson

Production Designer:

Patricia Norris
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HISTORY

A brief scene following end credits depicts “Bloodhound Bob” chasing his dogs across a field.
       On 24 Feb 1992, Var announced that Castle Rock Entertainment had approved production of Amos & Andrew, the first directorial effort of screenwriter E. Max Frye. A 20 Apr 1992 Var item indicated that Jonathan Demme, the director of Frye’s previous feature script, Something Wild (1986, see entry) was to serve as executive producer. However, Demme is not credited in the final film.
       According to the 20 Apr 1992 Var, principal photography began 6 Apr 1992 in Wilmington, NC. The 5 Jun 1992 Screen International referred to the production company, All Night Productions, which is not listed onscreen.
       Reviews were generally negative. The 15 Mar 1993 Var box-office report listed an opening weekend gross of $4,583,100 from 1,233 theaters.
       End credits state: “Filmed on location in North Carolina and Carolco Studios, Inc.,” and, “Producers wish to thank...Congressman Charlie Rose; City of Southport; Judge and Nancy Burnett; New Hanover County; Holiday-Rambler Motorhomes; New England Sports Network (NESN); North Carolina Film Office; Speare & Company; Hollywood Rental Co., Inc./Mathews Group; The Viking Range Corporation; HADCO; Bob Harvey; Bob ... More Less

A brief scene following end credits depicts “Bloodhound Bob” chasing his dogs across a field.
       On 24 Feb 1992, Var announced that Castle Rock Entertainment had approved production of Amos & Andrew, the first directorial effort of screenwriter E. Max Frye. A 20 Apr 1992 Var item indicated that Jonathan Demme, the director of Frye’s previous feature script, Something Wild (1986, see entry) was to serve as executive producer. However, Demme is not credited in the final film.
       According to the 20 Apr 1992 Var, principal photography began 6 Apr 1992 in Wilmington, NC. The 5 Jun 1992 Screen International referred to the production company, All Night Productions, which is not listed onscreen.
       Reviews were generally negative. The 15 Mar 1993 Var box-office report listed an opening weekend gross of $4,583,100 from 1,233 theaters.
       End credits state: “Filmed on location in North Carolina and Carolco Studios, Inc.,” and, “Producers wish to thank...Congressman Charlie Rose; City of Southport; Judge and Nancy Burnett; New Hanover County; Holiday-Rambler Motorhomes; New England Sports Network (NESN); North Carolina Film Office; Speare & Company; Hollywood Rental Co., Inc./Mathews Group; The Viking Range Corporation; HADCO; Bob Harvey; Bob Hunter.” More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Hollywood Reporter
19 Feb 1993
p. 10, 49.
Los Angeles Times
5 Mar 1993
Calendar, p. 10.
New York Times
5 Mar 1993
Section C, p. 14.
Screen International
5 Jun 1992
p. 17.
Variety
24 Feb 1992
p. 262.
Variety
20 Apr 1992
p. 10.
Variety
22 Feb 1993
p. 64.
Variety
15 Mar 1993
p. 10.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
Castle Rock Entertainment
in Association with New Line Cinema presents
a Max Frye Picture
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Prod mgr
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
2d 2d asst dir
PRODUCERS
Co-prod
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Cam op
Gaffer
Key grip
Dolly grip
Focus puller
Still photog
2d cam op
Aerial photog
Steadicam op
Steadicam asst cam
2d cam focus puller
Cam loader
Cam trainee
Aerial asst cam
Key rigging grip
Rigging gaffer
Best boy elec
Lamp op
Lamp op
Lamp op
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des
Storyboard artist
Asst art dir
FILM EDITORS
1st asst film ed
Asst film ed
Asst film ed
Apprentice film ed
Negative cutter
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Leadperson
Prop master
Asst prop master
Const coord
Const foreman
Const foreman
On-set dresser
Set dresser
Set dresser
Set dresser
Set dresser
2d asst props
Head scenic artist
Paint foreman
Painter
Painter
Painter
Painter
Painter
Painter
Lead carpenter
Carpenter
Carpenter
Carpenter
Carpenter
Carpenter
Carpenter
Carpenter
Carpenter
Carpenter
Const purchaser
Stone mason
COSTUMES
Cost des
Cost supv
Costumer
Seamstress
MUSIC
Orch cond by
Score rec and mixed by
Mus contractor
Mus coord
Mus rec at
SOUND
Sd mixer
Boom op
Cableman
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec
Re-rec
Supv sd ed
Supv ADR ed
Dial ed
ADR ed
Sd eff ed
Sd eff ed
Sd eff ed
Foley ed
1st asst sd ed
Asst sd ed
Asst sd ed
Apprentice sd ed
Sd transfer
Sd transfer
Foley artist
Foley artist
Foley mixer
Foley rec
ADR mixer
ADR mixer
ADR mixer
ADR rec
ADR rec
ADR rec
ADR rec
Group ADR by
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff coord
Spec eff foreman
Main titles des and prod by
End titles & opticals by
MAKEUP
Makeup artist
Asst makeup artist
Hairstylist
Asst hairstylist
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
Scr supv
Prod supv
Dogs supplied by
Dog trainer
Dog trainer
Loc mgr
Transportation coord
Transportation capt
Prod accountant
Asst prod accountant
Asst prod coord
Helicopter pilot
Asst to Mr. Goetzman
Asst to Mr. Frye
Asst to Mr. Persinger
Asst to Mr. Cage
Asst loc mgr
Accounting clerk
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Casting assoc
Los Angeles casting assoc
Craft services
Set medic
Bloodhound trainer
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Post prod accountant
Post prod accountant
Travel services provided by
Completion bond provided by
STAND INS
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunt coord
COLOR PERSONNEL
Col timer
Film processing by
Col and prints by
SOURCES
SONGS
"Beyond The Sea," performed by Bobby Darin, written by Charles Trenet/Jack Lawrence, courtesy of Atlantic Recording Corp., by arrangement with Warner Special Products
"Tales of Brave Ulysses," performed by Cream, written by Eric Clapton/Martin Sharpe, courtesy of Polygram Special Markets
"Mozart's Concerto #2 For Horn And Orchestra," performed by The Dresden Philharmonic
+
SONGS
"Beyond The Sea," performed by Bobby Darin, written by Charles Trenet/Jack Lawrence, courtesy of Atlantic Recording Corp., by arrangement with Warner Special Products
"Tales of Brave Ulysses," performed by Cream, written by Eric Clapton/Martin Sharpe, courtesy of Polygram Special Markets
"Mozart's Concerto #2 For Horn And Orchestra," performed by The Dresden Philharmonic
"Mozart's Concerto #2 For Horn And Orchestra," performed by The Dresden Philharmonic, courtesy of LazerLight/Sounds of Film
"We Are Marchin'," written by Loretta Devine and Ron Taylor
"Suburbian Nightmare," written and performed by Sir Mix-A-Lot, courtesy of Def American Recordings/Rhyme Cartel Records.
+
DETAILS
Release Date:
5 March 1993
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles and New York openings: 5 March 1993
Production Date:
began 6 April 1992
Copyright Claimant:
Castle Rock Entertainment
Copyright Date:
19 March 1993
Copyright Number:
PA605475
Physical Properties:
Sound
Dolby Stereo ® in Selected Theatres
Color
Lenses
Filmed with Panavision® Cameras & Lenses
Duration(in mins):
107
MPAA Rating:
PG-13
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
32296
SYNOPSIS

Reveling in his recent success, celebrated African-American playwright Andrew Sterling purchases a vacation home on an exclusive, seemingly liberal resort island in New England. His first night in the house, Andrew unpacks his stereo and settles down to read a magazine. While walking their dog, white neighbors Phil and Judy Gillman see Andrew inside and assume he is a burglar. When Chief of Police Cecil Tolliver arrives, Andrew is startled by the sound of his car alarm and emerges from the house, prompting one of the junior officers to open fire. Andrew runs back into the foyer and answers a telephone call from Tolliver, who believes he is speaking to the original homeowner and warns of an armed intruder. However, Tolliver quickly realizes his mistake and retreats in embarrassment. Determined to keep the incident from hurting his upcoming bid for County Commissioner, the police chief brokers a deal with a petty career criminal named Amos Odell. In exchange for his freedom, Amos agrees to pose as a robber while Tolliver stages Andrew’s rescue. Inside the house, Amos takes Andrew hostage while Tolliver informs the press of his intent to resolve the fabricated situation. In the interviews, however, Tolliver betrays his promise to keep Amos’s identity anonymous. When Tolliver enters through the back door, Amos retaliates by knocking him unconscious, handcuffing himself to Andrew, and sneaking out of the house. As reporters swarm the island, Amos and Andrew seek refuge inside the Gillman home and trade stories about their vastly different upbringings. When the Gillmans return, Amos holds them at gunpoint. Meanwhile, Tolliver revives and assumes Amos is hiding somewhere inside the house. Communicating via remote radio, Amos demands police ... +


Reveling in his recent success, celebrated African-American playwright Andrew Sterling purchases a vacation home on an exclusive, seemingly liberal resort island in New England. His first night in the house, Andrew unpacks his stereo and settles down to read a magazine. While walking their dog, white neighbors Phil and Judy Gillman see Andrew inside and assume he is a burglar. When Chief of Police Cecil Tolliver arrives, Andrew is startled by the sound of his car alarm and emerges from the house, prompting one of the junior officers to open fire. Andrew runs back into the foyer and answers a telephone call from Tolliver, who believes he is speaking to the original homeowner and warns of an armed intruder. However, Tolliver quickly realizes his mistake and retreats in embarrassment. Determined to keep the incident from hurting his upcoming bid for County Commissioner, the police chief brokers a deal with a petty career criminal named Amos Odell. In exchange for his freedom, Amos agrees to pose as a robber while Tolliver stages Andrew’s rescue. Inside the house, Amos takes Andrew hostage while Tolliver informs the press of his intent to resolve the fabricated situation. In the interviews, however, Tolliver betrays his promise to keep Amos’s identity anonymous. When Tolliver enters through the back door, Amos retaliates by knocking him unconscious, handcuffing himself to Andrew, and sneaking out of the house. As reporters swarm the island, Amos and Andrew seek refuge inside the Gillman home and trade stories about their vastly different upbringings. When the Gillmans return, Amos holds them at gunpoint. Meanwhile, Tolliver revives and assumes Amos is hiding somewhere inside the house. Communicating via remote radio, Amos demands police give him $1 million and provide a getaway helicopter. While officers debate what to do, Amos finds a confiscated videotape of a candid interview with Phil and Judy Gillman moments after the supposed break-in. Insulted by their blatant racism, Andrew expresses disappointment in the community and “white America,” but Amos points out the hypocrisy of Andrew’s fervent attempts to assimilate into upper class white society. After ordering a pizza, Amos realizes the police are still at Andrew’s house, where a group of protesters led by the fanatical Reverend Fenton Brunch demand the writer’s release. A scuffle ensues, and Andrew’s house is burned to the ground. Meanwhile, Amos gives the interview tape to the pizza delivery girl, and instructs her to pass it on to the press. He finds the Gillmans’ car keys and urges Andrew to join him, claiming they are “partners in crime.” However, Andrew refuses to leave, and the two men fight on the front lawn. Andrew eventually gains the upper hand and attempts to flee, but encounters two bloodhounds belonging to a neighboring farmer. Amos rescues him in the Gillmans’ car, and they agree to sic the dogs on Tolliver. In the morning, Andrew meets his wife at the island ferry port, and Amos leaves to begin his new life on the lam. Although he has always dreamed of going to Canada, Amos unknowingly turns the wrong direction on the highway and begins driving south. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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