He Couldn't Take It (1933)

63 or 65 mins | Comedy-drama | 15 December 1933

Director:

William Nigh

Cinematographer:

Jack MacKenzie

Editor:

Jack Ogilvie

Production Company:

Monogram Pictures Corp.
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HISTORY

The working titles for this film were Born Tough and The Process Server . Modern sources report that writer Dore Schary wrote the screenplay in two weeks and that entire film was shot in a continuous seven-day period. Producer W. T. Lackey reworked the story for Monogram Pictures again in 1943 as Here Comes Kelly , starring Eddie Quillan and directed by William Beaudine. The story was also used in 1946 for Live Wires , starring the Bowery Boys and directed by Phil ... More Less

The working titles for this film were Born Tough and The Process Server . Modern sources report that writer Dore Schary wrote the screenplay in two weeks and that entire film was shot in a continuous seven-day period. Producer W. T. Lackey reworked the story for Monogram Pictures again in 1943 as Here Comes Kelly , starring Eddie Quillan and directed by William Beaudine. The story was also used in 1946 for Live Wires , starring the Bowery Boys and directed by Phil Karlson. More Less

BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
29 Nov 33
p. 3.
Film Daily
13 Dec 33
p. 7.
Motion Picture Herald
24 Mar 34
p. 48.
Variety
27 Mar 34
p. 12.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
Trem Carr, Vice-President in Charge of Production; A W. T. Lackey Production
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTOR
WRITERS
Scr and story
Addl dial
PHOTOGRAPHY
ART DIRECTOR
FILM EDITOR
DETAILS
Alternate Titles:
The Process Server
Born Tough
Release Date:
15 December 1933
Copyright Claimant:
Monogram Pictures Corp.
Copyright Date:
1 January 1934
Copyright Number:
LP4732
Physical Properties:
Sound
Balsley & Phillips Recording System
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
63 or 65
Length(in reels):
7
Country:
United States
SYNOPSIS

Argumentative Jimmy Case loses yet another job when he argues with, then punches, a passenger on his city bus. When his sweetheart, Eleanor Rogers, learns of this latest firing, she breaks their engagement. After an attempt to use his fists in a boxing ring ends in a knockout, Case makes up with Eleanor and agrees to meet her boss, lawyer H. Herbert Oakley, to discuss a possible career in law. Case starts night school but soon loses his temper and hits the teacher. After being served with a summons for the fight by his friend, Sammy Kohn, Case decides to take up process serving. Kohn arranges for a job for Case with his boss. While serving papers on a dancer, Grace Clarice, a free-for-all starts. Case escapes through Clarice's window, leaving Eleanor to fend for herself. This is the last straw for Eleanor, who decides to join Oakley on a business trip to Montreal. Case and Kohn are selected to serve summons on "Sweet Sue" and "Number Seven" as part of the district attorney's crackdown on city graft, but first they have to find out the identities of their victims. Case discovers an address and goes to serve the papers on Sweet Sue, who turns out to be a over-sized gangster. While Case is there, he discovers that Oakley is Number Seven. When Kohn tells him that Eleanor is going away with Oakley, he and Case race to the train to stop them. Case rescues Eleanor just in time and serves Oakley. The next day, Eleanor is brought to the city building and taken to the Marriage ... +


Argumentative Jimmy Case loses yet another job when he argues with, then punches, a passenger on his city bus. When his sweetheart, Eleanor Rogers, learns of this latest firing, she breaks their engagement. After an attempt to use his fists in a boxing ring ends in a knockout, Case makes up with Eleanor and agrees to meet her boss, lawyer H. Herbert Oakley, to discuss a possible career in law. Case starts night school but soon loses his temper and hits the teacher. After being served with a summons for the fight by his friend, Sammy Kohn, Case decides to take up process serving. Kohn arranges for a job for Case with his boss. While serving papers on a dancer, Grace Clarice, a free-for-all starts. Case escapes through Clarice's window, leaving Eleanor to fend for herself. This is the last straw for Eleanor, who decides to join Oakley on a business trip to Montreal. Case and Kohn are selected to serve summons on "Sweet Sue" and "Number Seven" as part of the district attorney's crackdown on city graft, but first they have to find out the identities of their victims. Case discovers an address and goes to serve the papers on Sweet Sue, who turns out to be a over-sized gangster. While Case is there, he discovers that Oakley is Number Seven. When Kohn tells him that Eleanor is going away with Oakley, he and Case race to the train to stop them. Case rescues Eleanor just in time and serves Oakley. The next day, Eleanor is brought to the city building and taken to the Marriage Licence Bureau, where Case is waiting for her. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.