Quick Trigger Lee (1931)

60 mins | Western | 24 November 1931

Director:

J. P. McGowan

Writer:

George Morgan

Cinematographer:

Edward A. Kull

Editor:

Fred Bain

Production Company:

Big 4 Film Corp.
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HISTORY

Modern sources credit Burton King with the photography. In the synopsis filed with the copyright registration, the Quick Trigger character is named Phil Lang rather than Phil ... More Less

Modern sources credit Burton King with the photography. In the synopsis filed with the copyright registration, the Quick Trigger character is named Phil Lang rather than Phil Lee. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Film Daily
18 Oct 31
p. 4.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTOR
PRODUCER
Prod supv
WRITER
Story and cont
PHOTOGRAPHY
FILM EDITOR
SOUND
Sd tech
DETAILS
Release Date:
24 November 1931
Production Date:
ended mid-October 1931
Copyright Claimant:
Big 4 Film Corp.
Copyright Date:
24 November 1931
Copyright Number:
LP2685
Physical Properties:
Sound
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
60
Length(in feet):
5,500
Length(in reels):
6
Country:
United States
Passed by NBR:
Yes
SYNOPSIS

The Rose O'Heart Mine is owned by John Saunders, a prospector with bad eyesight. He purchased the mine with a loan from Jeremy Wales and his son Sam, who now intend to repossess it. When they learn that Phil Lee, known as "Quick Trigger" because of his quickness with a gun, is coming to town on Saunders' behalf, the Waleses plan an ambush. They do not attack, however, when they see that Phil is not carrying his guns, and Phil hands them a check for a $1,000 to cover Saunders' debt. Wales insists that the loan was for $10,000, but Phil argues that Wales knew Saunders could not read the paper he signed without his glasses, which had earlier been smashed by Sam. Sam takes exception to Phil's accusations and they fight. Defeated, Sam slinks out of the room, and Phil draws a hidden gun and forces Wales to sign a receipt for the full repayment of the loan. Phil escapes with the receipt just as Sam returns with the rest of Wales's men. As he heads for Saunders' mine, Phil hears gunshots and, riding over the next ridge, sees a woman in a wagon drawing the fire of some men in an open car. Phil intercedes only to learn that the woman, Rose Campbell, is an actress acting in a movie. After some laughter at his expense, Rose thanks him for trying to save her from what he thought was real danger and invites him to a dance the movie company is giving that evening. Phil finally arrives at Saunders' mine, but Sam and his men have ... +


The Rose O'Heart Mine is owned by John Saunders, a prospector with bad eyesight. He purchased the mine with a loan from Jeremy Wales and his son Sam, who now intend to repossess it. When they learn that Phil Lee, known as "Quick Trigger" because of his quickness with a gun, is coming to town on Saunders' behalf, the Waleses plan an ambush. They do not attack, however, when they see that Phil is not carrying his guns, and Phil hands them a check for a $1,000 to cover Saunders' debt. Wales insists that the loan was for $10,000, but Phil argues that Wales knew Saunders could not read the paper he signed without his glasses, which had earlier been smashed by Sam. Sam takes exception to Phil's accusations and they fight. Defeated, Sam slinks out of the room, and Phil draws a hidden gun and forces Wales to sign a receipt for the full repayment of the loan. Phil escapes with the receipt just as Sam returns with the rest of Wales's men. As he heads for Saunders' mine, Phil hears gunshots and, riding over the next ridge, sees a woman in a wagon drawing the fire of some men in an open car. Phil intercedes only to learn that the woman, Rose Campbell, is an actress acting in a movie. After some laughter at his expense, Rose thanks him for trying to save her from what he thought was real danger and invites him to a dance the movie company is giving that evening. Phil finally arrives at Saunders' mine, but Sam and his men have gotten there first and prepare to attack Phil. Forewarned by Saunders' nervous glance, Phil overcomes his assailants. Sam has learned that Rose is Saunders' granddaughter and plans to kidnap her that evening at the dance. His plans are thwarted when Phil attends the dance and also learns that Rose is looking for Saunders. He offers to take her to him immediately, but Sam overhears, and while Rose changes her clothes, his men attack Phil. Sam rushes Rose away, but Phil chases them, tossing the men out of the moving car one by one. He drives Rose to Saunders' cabin, where they happily embrace. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.