Indecent Proposal (1993)

R | 118 mins | Drama, Romance | 7 April 1993

Director:

Adrian Lyne

Producer:

Sherry Lansing

Cinematographer:

Howard Atherton

Editor:

Joe Hutshing

Production Designer:

Mel Bourne
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HISTORY

According to a 13 Sep 1995 HR article, Paramount Pictures paid Jack Engelhard $120,000 for screen rights to his novel, Indecent Proposal, and promised the author two percent of the picture’s net profits. A 6 Jul 1992 Publishers Weekly item reported that Pocket Books had purchased paperback rights to the 1988 novel, and a paperback release was slated to tie in with the film’s opening, then set for Mar 1993.
       A 27 Sep 1991 Screen International item noted that producer Sherry Lansing approached Julia Roberts to play the role of “Diana Murphy,” with plans to begin filming Jan 1992. Also considered for the role of Diana, actresses Isabel Adjani, Lolita Davidson, and Nicole Kidman performed screen tests, as mentioned in a 9 Mar 1992 DV item. Later that month, a 20 Mar 1992 Screen International brief reported that Kidman and her then-husband, actor Tom Cruise, had been pursuing the roles of Diana and “David Murphy,” but had recently dropped out. On 9 Mar 1992, Var speculated that Cruise lost interest in the project because its morals were not in keeping with his newfound religion, the Church of Scientology. Other actors considered for David Murphy included Johnny Depp, Tim Robbins, and brothers Alec and William Baldwin, according to Screen International and a 24 May 1992 LAT item. According to the 9 Mar 1992 Var and LAT, Warren Beatty, Dustin Hoffman, Robert De Niro, and Jeff Bridges were considered for the role of “John Gage.”
       Director Adrian Lyne and Paramount president Stanley Jaffe had a well-publicized argument shortly before ... More Less

According to a 13 Sep 1995 HR article, Paramount Pictures paid Jack Engelhard $120,000 for screen rights to his novel, Indecent Proposal, and promised the author two percent of the picture’s net profits. A 6 Jul 1992 Publishers Weekly item reported that Pocket Books had purchased paperback rights to the 1988 novel, and a paperback release was slated to tie in with the film’s opening, then set for Mar 1993.
       A 27 Sep 1991 Screen International item noted that producer Sherry Lansing approached Julia Roberts to play the role of “Diana Murphy,” with plans to begin filming Jan 1992. Also considered for the role of Diana, actresses Isabel Adjani, Lolita Davidson, and Nicole Kidman performed screen tests, as mentioned in a 9 Mar 1992 DV item. Later that month, a 20 Mar 1992 Screen International brief reported that Kidman and her then-husband, actor Tom Cruise, had been pursuing the roles of Diana and “David Murphy,” but had recently dropped out. On 9 Mar 1992, Var speculated that Cruise lost interest in the project because its morals were not in keeping with his newfound religion, the Church of Scientology. Other actors considered for David Murphy included Johnny Depp, Tim Robbins, and brothers Alec and William Baldwin, according to Screen International and a 24 May 1992 LAT item. According to the 9 Mar 1992 Var and LAT, Warren Beatty, Dustin Hoffman, Robert De Niro, and Jeff Bridges were considered for the role of “John Gage.”
       Director Adrian Lyne and Paramount president Stanley Jaffe had a well-publicized argument shortly before production was set to begin, when Lyne became angered by Jaffe’s suggestion that they accelerate the post-production schedule to allow the film to open by Christmas 1992. A 31 Mar 1992 DV news item noted that Jaffe and Lyne had fought several times previously on Fatal Attraction (1987, see entry), but that they would always reconcile; in the meantime, Lansing put the already-hired crew members “on a week-to-week hiatus until further notice.” Shooting was expected to begin 15 May 1992, when actor Robert Redford became available; however, Redford had not signed off on the role of John Gage to that time, as he and Paramount were still “very far apart on financial terms.” A 27 Apr 1992 LAT article later reported that Redford turned down the $4 million salary initially offered him in exchange for gross profit participation.
       DV and HR items reported on 5 Jun 1992 that MGM-Pathe Entertainment filed a lawsuit against actor Woody Harrelson, Paramount, Lansing and Lyne, claiming that Harrelson had broken a “pay-or-play” contract to star in Benny and Joon (1993, see entry) after taking the role of David Murphy in Indecent Proposal. According to DV, MGM claimed that Harrelson entered into a written contract to play “Benny” on 2 Apr 1992, with principal photography planned to begin 2 Jun 1992. However, Harrelson pulled out of the contract 23 Apr 1992, claiming that he could not trust director Jeremiah Chechik for the MGM film. The lawsuit contended that Paramount, Lansing, and Lyne encouraged Harrelson to forgo MGM’s movie for theirs, and stated that damages, including costs associated with pre-production, advertising, casting, and attorney’s fees, were in excess of $5 million. According to a 16 Apr 1993 Chicago Tribune article, the lawsuit was settled and Paramount had to pay “upwards of $400,000” to MGM.
       As stated in production notes from AMPAS library files, the filmmakers scouted more than seventy locations over the course of nine months during pre-production. In his 28 May 1992 DV “Just for Variety” column, Army Archerd reported that rehearsals were set to begin 1 Jun 1992 at the Las Vegas Hilton Hotel and Casino in Las Vegas, NV. Principal photography began two weeks later with shooting in the casino between the hours of four a.m. and four p.m., during which time the casino remained operational. After a month in Las Vegas, the production moved to Southern California. Filming took place in forty locations across Los Angeles, CA, including the neighborhood of Echo Park; additionally, a Santa Barbara, CA, mansion doubled for millionaire Gage’s home.
       The production budget was roughly $32 million, as noted in a 13 Apr 1993 LAT article. Although a Christmas 1992 opening had been discussed, Lyne was allowed a five-month post-production period, completing the film roughly two weeks before its opening, as stated in a 29 Mar 1993 Orange County Register item. For its marketing of the film, Paramount won the “Excellence in Film Marketing Award” for Apr 1993 from the Film Information Council, marking the first time the studio had received the accolade that was launched eight months before, according to a 21 May 1993 DV brief.
       The opening week box-office gross for Indecent Proposal was $25 million, as reported in a 10 Apr 1993 NYT article. A 25 May 1993 DV news item stated that the film had taken in $88.7 in domestic box-office receipts, and an additional $28.8 million in foreign territories. A 16 Apr 1993 HR suggested that a “sleepy April marketplace” aided the film’s success, stating that no other films that had recently opened were targeted at adult female moviegoers.
       Critical reception was mixed. As noted in LAT articles on 18 Apr 1993 and 1 May 1993, there was a feminist backlash to the film, fueled by the fact that the lead female character is sold, for one night, by her husband to another man. At a “cable-sponsored forum” in Beverly Hills, CA, called “Women and Power – New Images and Realities,” feminist leader Betty Friedan delivered a keynote address that included an admonition of the female filmmakers behind Indecent Proposal, Lansing and screenwriter Amy Holden Jones. Friedan stated, “Don’t say women made this movie...shame on them,” and claimed that the film had made her “sick.” In the 18 Apr 1993 article, Jones defended her screenplay and said that Diana Murphy made the choice in the film, not her husband, and called Diana’s storyline “the ultimate female fantasy.” LAT writer Patrick Goldstein pointed to three recent films in addition to Indecent Proposal that dealt with the theme of women being sold or bartered, including Pretty Woman (1990), Mad Dog and Glory (1993), and Honeymoon in Vegas (1992, see entries) suggesting that the “latest high-concept twist” in Hollywood films was “Woman as Door Prize.”
       The 13 Sep 1995 HR reported that novelist Jack Engelhard was suing Paramount with claims that he had not been paid the two percent of the film’s net profits that he was owed. However, Paramount alleged that, “despite $250 million in worldwide ticket sales,” the studio had only netted $35.7 million, partly due to the gross profit participation that had been paid to Lansing, Lyne, Harrelson, lead actress Demi Moore, and Redford. HR alleged that Redford alone had earned roughly $20 million for the film.
       End credits include the following statement: "The producers gratefully acknowledge the following for their assistance and cooperation: Las Vegas Hilton Hotel; selected wardrobes by Cerruti 1881 Paris; Mr. Dennis Washington, owner of the Motor Yacht Attessa; Cartier; Frances Klein Estate Jewels; Murray's Iron Works; selected home furnishings by Thomas W. Morgan, Inc., Los Angeles; Capitol Records, Inc. and Ill-Eagle Enterprises, Ltd.; horseracing footage courtesy of NBC Sports." More Less

BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Chicago Tribune
16 Apr 1993.
---
Daily Variety
9 Mar 1992.
---
Daily Variety
10 Mar 1992.
---
Daily Variety
31 Mar 1992.
---
Daily Variety
21 May 1993.
---
Daily Variety
28 May 1992.
---
Daily Variety
5 Jun 1992
p. 1, 28.
Daily Variety
25 May 1993.
---
Hollywood Reporter
27 Mar 1992
p. 1, 36.
Hollywood Reporter
5 Jun 1992.
---
Hollywood Reporter
11 Aug 1992.
---
Hollywood Reporter
1 Sep 1992.
---
Hollywood Reporter
7 Apr 1993
p. 5, 13.
Hollywood Reporter
16 Apr 1993.
---
Hollywood Reporter
13 Sep 1995
p. 4, 17.
Los Angeles Times
12 Apr 1992.
---
Los Angeles Times
27 Apr 1992.
---
Los Angeles Times
24 May 1992.
---
Los Angeles Times
28 Jun 1992.
---
Los Angeles Times
3 Apr 1993
p. 1.
Los Angeles Times
13 Apr 1993
Section F, p. 1, 4.
Los Angeles Times
18 Apr 1993
Calendar, p. 8, 26-30.
Los Angeles Times
1 May 1993
Section F, p. 1, 16.
New York Times
7 Apr 1993
p. 13.
New York Times
10 Apr 1993.
---
Orange County Register
29 Mar 1993.
---
Publishers Weekly
6 Jul 1992.
---
Screen International
27 Sep 1991.
---
Screen International
20 Mar 1992.
---
Variety
9 Mar 1992.
---
Variety
12 Apr 1993
p. 75.
CAST
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
Citizenship students:
[and]
Architecture students:
Auction bidders:
[and]
Special appearance by
Special appearance by
+
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
A Sherry Lansing Production
An Adrian Lyne Film
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Unit prod mgr
Unit prod mgr
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
2d 2d asst dir
DGA trainee
PRODUCERS
Exec prod
Exec prod
Co-prod
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
1st asst photog
2d asst photog
Cam loader
Video computer supv
Chief lighting tech
Asst chief lighting tech
Asst chief lighting tech
Elec
Elec
1st company grip
2d company grip
Dolly grip
Grip
Still photog
Elec, Las Vegas crew
Grip, Las Vegas crew
Grip, Las Vegas crew
Grip, Las Vegas crew
Grip, Las Vegas crew
Grip, Las Vegas crew
Grip, Las Vegas crew
Grip, Las Vegas crew
Grip, Las Vegas crew
Grip, Las Vegas crew
Grip, Las Vegas crew
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des
Art dir
Art dept coord
FILM EDITORS
Addl film ed
Addl film ed
Addl film ed
Asst film ed
Asst film ed
Asst film ed
Asst film ed
Asst film ed
Apprentice ed
Negative cutter
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Prop master
Asst prop master
Prop asst
Leadperson
Prop person
Prop person
Prop person
Prop person
Prop person
Const coord
Const gen foreperson
Const foreperson
Const foreperson
Labor foreperson
Prod painter
Prod painter
Const, Las Vegas crew
Const, Las Vegas crew
Set dresser, Las Vegas crew
Set dresser, Las Vegas crew
Set dresser, Las Vegas crew
Set dresser, Las Vegas crew
COSTUMES
Cost des
Cost des
Ward supv
Ward supv
Ms. Moore's cost
Set cost
MUSIC
Mus comp
Mus supv
Mus ed
Mus prod set supv
Orch cond
Orchestrator
Orch contractor
Mus scoring mixer
Piano performances of instrumental score by
SOUND
Sd mixer
Boom op
Utility sd tech
Supv sd ed
Sd eff ed
Sd eff ed
Sd eff ed
Sd eff ed
Sd eff ed
Supv ADR ed
ADR ed
Dial ed
Dial ed
Supv foley ed
Foley ed
Asst sd ed
Asst sd ed
Asst sd ed
ADR mixer
Foley mixer
Foley artist
Foley artist
Voice casting
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff coord
Asst spec eff
Main title composite and opticals by
Main and end titles des and prod by
MAKEUP
Make-up artist
Mr. Redford's make-up artist
Ms. Moore's make-up artist
Hairstylist
Mr. Redford's hairstylist
Ms. Moore's hairstylist
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
Scr supv
Unit pub
Prod coord
Asst prod coord
Prod accountant
Asst prod accountant
Payroll accountant
Accounting asst
Accounting asst
Post prod accountant
Asst to Ms. Lansing
Asst to Ms. Lansing
Asst to Mr. Tadross
Asst to Mr. Lyne
Secy to Mr. Lyne
Asst to Ms. Moore
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Casting asst
Casting asst
Extras casting
Extras casting asst
Transportation coord
Transportation capt
Loc mgr
Loc mgr
Asst loc mgr
Asst loc mgr
24 frame video displays by
Video image coord
Video tech supv
Caterer, For Star Caterers
Caterer, For Star Caterers
Caterer, For Star Caterers
Caterer, For Star Caterers
Los Angeles craft service
Security for Ms. Moore
2d unit consultant, Las Vegas crew
Projectionist, Las Vegas crew
Craft service, Las Vegas crew
First aid, Las Vegas crew
STAND INS
Stunt coord
COLOR PERSONNEL
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the novel Indecent Proposal by Jack Engelhard (New York, 1988).
MUSIC
"Nighttime," by Oscar Peterson, performed by Herbie Hancock, Herbie Hancock performs courtesy of QWest Records
"Concerto No. 8 in A Minor ('L'Estro Armonico')," by A. Vivaldi, performed by I Musici, courtesy of Philips Classics, by arrangement with Polygram Special Markets.
SONGS
"You Light Up My Life," by Joe Brooks
"EZ Come EZ Go," by Kristine Weitz & Joe Blaum, performed by Kristine Weitz
"No Ordinary Love," by Stuart Matthewman & H.F. Adu, performed by Sade, courtesy of Epic Records, by arrangement with Sony Music Licensing
+
SONGS
"You Light Up My Life," by Joe Brooks
"EZ Come EZ Go," by Kristine Weitz & Joe Blaum, performed by Kristine Weitz
"No Ordinary Love," by Stuart Matthewman & H.F. Adu, performed by Sade, courtesy of Epic Records, by arrangement with Sony Music Licensing
"Cryin' Time," by Buck Owens, performed by Ray Charles, courtesy of Ray Charles Enterprises
"The Nearness of You," by Ned Washington & Hoagy Carmichael, performed by Sheena Easton, produced by Patrice Rushen, Sheena Easton performs courtesy of MCA Records
"Help Me Make It Through the Night," by Kris Kristofferson
"All Saints," written and performed by David Bowie & Brian Eno, courtesy of David Bowie
"What Do You Want the Girl To Do," by Allen Toussaint, performed by Vince Gill featuring Little Feat, produced by Tony Brown, Vince Gill performs courtesy of MCA Records, Little Feat performs courtesy of Morgan Creek Records, Inc.
"Out of the Window," written and performed by Seal, produced by Trevor Horn, Seal performs courtesy of ZTT Records/Sire Records Company/Warner Music UK Ltd.
"In the Midnight Hour," by Wilson Pickett & Steve Cropper, performed by Roxy Music, courtesy of Reprise Records (by arrangement with Warner Special Products)/Virgin EG Records Ltd.
"I'm Not in Love," by Graham Gouldman & Eric Stewart, performed by The Pretenders, produced by Trevor Horn, The Pretenders perform courtesy of Sire Records Company/Warner Music UK Ltd.
"A Love So Beautiful," by Roy Orbison & Jeff Lynne, performed by Roy Orbison, courtesy of Virgin Records America, Inc.
"In All the Right Places," music by John Barry, lyric by Lisa Stansfield, Ian Devaney & Andy Morris, performed by Lisa Stansfield, produced by Ian Devaney & Andy Morris, executive producer: John Barry, Lisa Stansfield performs courtesy of BMG Arista Records Limited/Arista Records, Inc.
+
DETAILS
Release Date:
7 April 1993
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles opening: 7 April 1993
New York opening: week of 7 April 1993
Production Date:
began mid June 1992 in Las Vegas, NV
Copyright Claimant:
Paramount Pictures Corporation
Copyright Date:
7 May 1993
Copyright Number:
PA610723
Physical Properties:
Sound
Dolby Stereo ® in Selected Theatres
Color
Color by deluxe®
Lenses/Prints
Filmed with Panavision® lenses & cameras
Duration(in mins):
118
MPAA Rating:
R
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
31596
SYNOPSIS

In Los Angeles, California, architect David Murphy his wife Diana, a real estate agent, struggle to make ends meet . High school sweethearts who were married at nineteen, David and Diana sometimes bicker but enjoy a passionate and supportive relationship. After Diana finds a piece of land in Santa Monica, California, where David can build his dream home, she and David buy it. However, a recession hits, causing Diana’s income to severely decrease. Soon, their lawyer, Jeremy, tells the couple that they are in danger of losing the property. One night, after borrowing $5,000 from his father, David gets the idea to gamble the money in Las Vegas, Nevada, in hopes of winning enough cash to pay off their debts, and Diana agrees to go. Hours later, in a Las Vegas casino, David wins some money at a slot machine then moves to a craps table, while Diana roams into a clothing shop. Outside the shop, billionaire John Gage notices Diana stealing chocolates and admiring an expensive evening gown. Gage offers to buy the dress for Diana; however, she senses that Gage is trying to buy her affections and rejects his offer. Diana finds David at the craps table, and when she realizes that Gage is watching from afar, she kisses David passionately. After winning $25,040 in the casino, David and Diana retire to their hotel room. Diana excitedly rolls around in piles of cash on the bed, and she and David make love. The next day, David and Diana continue gambling but lose almost all of their winnings. With only $4,100 remaining, Diana suggests they flip a coin to decide whether or not to continue. After the ... +


In Los Angeles, California, architect David Murphy his wife Diana, a real estate agent, struggle to make ends meet . High school sweethearts who were married at nineteen, David and Diana sometimes bicker but enjoy a passionate and supportive relationship. After Diana finds a piece of land in Santa Monica, California, where David can build his dream home, she and David buy it. However, a recession hits, causing Diana’s income to severely decrease. Soon, their lawyer, Jeremy, tells the couple that they are in danger of losing the property. One night, after borrowing $5,000 from his father, David gets the idea to gamble the money in Las Vegas, Nevada, in hopes of winning enough cash to pay off their debts, and Diana agrees to go. Hours later, in a Las Vegas casino, David wins some money at a slot machine then moves to a craps table, while Diana roams into a clothing shop. Outside the shop, billionaire John Gage notices Diana stealing chocolates and admiring an expensive evening gown. Gage offers to buy the dress for Diana; however, she senses that Gage is trying to buy her affections and rejects his offer. Diana finds David at the craps table, and when she realizes that Gage is watching from afar, she kisses David passionately. After winning $25,040 in the casino, David and Diana retire to their hotel room. Diana excitedly rolls around in piles of cash on the bed, and she and David make love. The next day, David and Diana continue gambling but lose almost all of their winnings. With only $4,100 remaining, Diana suggests they flip a coin to decide whether or not to continue. After the coin flip indicates they should gamble more, the couple bets the last of their money and loses it. Devastated, they walk through the casino, but David stops when he sees a crowd formed around a high-limit poker table. There, John Gage is on a losing streak, betting with $10,000 chips. Seeing Diana in the crowd, Gage leaves the table and asks David if Diana can sit with him for luck. David defers to Diana, who reluctantly agrees. However, when Gage ascertains that Diana prefers craps over poker, he asks a casino worker for one million dollars in chips. At a craps table, Gage instructs Diana to bet all of the chips, reminding her to kiss the dice before she throws them. Diana rolls a total of 11, and they rejoice along with a crowd of onlookers as Gage wins one million dollars. Gage offers to treat David and Diana to a room for the night, telling them to charge anything they want to the room. Soon after, Mr. Shackleford, Gage’s assistant, knocks on the door of their lavish hotel room, delivering a gift from Gage and inviting David and Diana to a gathering at Gage’s suite that night. Inside the gift box is the dress Diana was admiring the day before; shocked, Diana reveals that the dress cost $5,000. At Gage’s party that night, Gage plays billiards with David while Diana watches. He brings up the subject of happiness, and points out that, despite his superior wealth, David has something Gage does not have: Diana. Although Gage believes that everything can be bought, Diana insists that money cannot buy love. Gage asks David what he would say if Gage offered him $1 million for one night with Diana. Diana responds that David would tell him to “go to hell,” and David agrees. When Gage announces that the offer is real, David sticks to his answer of ‘no.’ Back in their hotel room, a restless Diana asks David if he secretly wants her to go through with Gage’s arrangement. David promises he does not, while Diana admits that she would do it, but only for him. In the morning, David calls Jeremy, tells him about Gage’s offer, and asks him to draw up a legal contract. Jeremy excitedly writes up the terms, rushes to Las Vegas, and obtains Gage’s signature. With $1 million to be delivered to their casino account the following morning, David and Diana part ways so that Diana can spend the night with Gage. However, he soon panics and decides to stop his wife, but she has left the room by the time David returns. After taking a helicopter ride to Gage’s yacht, Diana finds a dress laid out for her and puts on makeup. On the deck, Gage bets Diana that she will enjoy spending the night with him and promises that nothing will happen that she does not choose. The next morning, Diana returns to the hotel room where David nervously awaits her. After smearing off Diana’s red lipstick, David kisses her passionately. Back in Los Angeles, Diana and David are disheartened when they attempt to pay off the overdue mortgage on their Santa Monica property and learn that the bank repossessed and sold it to another buyer. Back at home, David obsesses over Diana’s night with Gage; searching her purse, he finds a business card with Gage’s phone number and confronts her about it, although Diana claims she has never seen it. Hoping to improve their relationship, Diana uses a connection in the real estate business to find out who purchased the Santa Monica property so that she can buy it back; however, she is furious when she discovers that Gage bought it. Diana finds Gage at a business lunch and embarrasses him by shouting at the table. Back at home, David begs Diana to tell him about her night with Gage, and she tearfully admits that they had pleasurable sex. Infuriated, David takes refuge at Jeremy’s apartment, and Diana calls Jeremy to relay the message that David can have their million dollars. Soon after, Gage finds Diana at her office and pretends to be shopping for a home. At the behest of her boss, Diana shows Gage a series of mansions for sale while he flirts with her. Finally, Gage admits he is not buying a home and shows Diana his mansion, saying that he wants her to live there. Sometime later, David moves into a smaller house and Diana takes a second job teaching citizenship. Gage stops in on one of her classes, and although Diana tries to make him leave, her students insist that he stay. Gage takes Diana back to his house and shows her two dogs that he bought to make the house cozier for her. Gage tells Diana about a secret crush he had as a boy, and says he never wants unrequited love to happen to him again. Before she leaves, Diana kisses him. One night, David sees Diana and Gage stepping out of Gage’s limousine in the rain. Drunk, David accosts Gage and attempts to punch him. The next day, David sobers up and decides to take a job as a professor. After attending one of David’s lectures, Jeremy tells him that Diana wants a divorce and is leaving all of their shared assets, including the million dollars, to him. At an outdoor charity auction, Gage bids $50,000 for a real hippopotamus that Diana said she liked, but David appears and offers $1 million, winning the animal. Gage allows Diana and David a moment alone, and a sudden downpour sends the other benefit goers running. David tells Diana that he regrets his decision in Las Vegas and admits that he thought Gage might be a better man than him. However, David now realizes that Gage only had more money. After signing the divorce papers, he leaves. Riding away from the auction, Diana asks Gage to talk, but Gage interrupts, telling Shackleford that Diana is the best of the “million-dollar club,” and revealing that he has entered into countless similar arrangements with other women. Smiling, Diana asks Shackleford to stop the car, kisses Gage, and thanks him. After she runs away from the car, Gage admits to Shackleford that he lied to end their relationship, knowing that Diana would never love him like she loved David. Diana goes to the Paradise Cove pier where David proposed marriage to her. Finding David there, she tells him she loves him and they hold hands. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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