Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom (1984)

PG | 118 mins | Adventure | 23 May 1984

Director:

Steven Spielberg

Producer:

Robert Watts

Cinematographer:

Douglas Slocombe

Editor:

Michael Kahn

Production Designer:

Elliot Scott

Production Company:

Lucasfilm Ltd.
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HISTORY

After Lucasfilm Ltd. and Paramount Pictures’ Raiders of the Lost Ark (1981, see entry) grossed $363 million worldwide, it was confirmed in the 10 Mar 1983 NYT that a sequel was in the works. Originally titled Indiana Jones and the Temple of Death, the screenplay was set in the years before the events depicted in its predecessor, thus making it a “prequel.” By mid-Apr 1983, the title was changed to Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom, as “Temple of Death” was deemed too foreboding.
       Executive producer and story writer George Lucas originated Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom as the second film in a World War II-set trilogy, intended partly as an homage to “action serials of the 1930s and ‘40s,” as stated in an 18 May 2008 Pittsburgh Tribune-Review article. In an interview published in the May 2008 issue of Empire, Lucas asserted that the decision to make a prequel was prompted by his and his collaborators’ desire to move away from the Nazi villains of Raiders of the Lost Ark, and depict different “bad guys.”
       The characters “Indiana Jones,” “Willie Scott,” and “Short Round” are named after filmmakers’ pets: Indiana’s namesake was Lucas’s Alaskan Malamute; Willie was named after director Steven Spielberg’s dog; and Short Round was the name of screenwriter Willard Huyck’s dog. The Pittsburgh Tribune-Review also pointed out the following references to Lucas’s Star Wars trilogy (see entries) contained within the film: the sound of a light saber activating can be heard during the scene in which Willie is caged over a ... More Less

After Lucasfilm Ltd. and Paramount Pictures’ Raiders of the Lost Ark (1981, see entry) grossed $363 million worldwide, it was confirmed in the 10 Mar 1983 NYT that a sequel was in the works. Originally titled Indiana Jones and the Temple of Death, the screenplay was set in the years before the events depicted in its predecessor, thus making it a “prequel.” By mid-Apr 1983, the title was changed to Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom, as “Temple of Death” was deemed too foreboding.
       Executive producer and story writer George Lucas originated Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom as the second film in a World War II-set trilogy, intended partly as an homage to “action serials of the 1930s and ‘40s,” as stated in an 18 May 2008 Pittsburgh Tribune-Review article. In an interview published in the May 2008 issue of Empire, Lucas asserted that the decision to make a prequel was prompted by his and his collaborators’ desire to move away from the Nazi villains of Raiders of the Lost Ark, and depict different “bad guys.”
       The characters “Indiana Jones,” “Willie Scott,” and “Short Round” are named after filmmakers’ pets: Indiana’s namesake was Lucas’s Alaskan Malamute; Willie was named after director Steven Spielberg’s dog; and Short Round was the name of screenwriter Willard Huyck’s dog. The Pittsburgh Tribune-Review also pointed out the following references to Lucas’s Star Wars trilogy (see entries) contained within the film: the sound of a light saber activating can be heard during the scene in which Willie is caged over a pit of lava; the Shanghai, China, nightclub shown in the opening sequence is named “Club Obi Wan,” after the character “Obi Wan Kenobi”; and Indiana Jones dons a vest that was originally worn by the character “Han Solo” (also played by Harrison Ford) in a scene that takes place in the “Pankot Palace.”
       According to the Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, Sharon Stone was one of the front-runners to play Willie Scott, until relative newcomer Kate Capshaw auditioned for the role. Once Capshaw completed a screen test, Spielberg showed it to Harrison Ford, who immediately agreed that Capshaw should be cast. Spielberg later began dating the actress, and they were married in 1985.
       First-time actor Ke Huy Quan was a Vietnamese refugee living in the U.S. when he accompanied his older brother to an open casting call for the role of Short Round. Quan, who claimed in the 17 May 1984 Boston Globe never to have never seen a movie before the audition, drew the attention of one of the casting directors despite his difficulty pronouncing some of the words in the script. On set, the boy struck up a friendship with his fellow actors, especially Harrison Ford, who taught him how to swim.
       A Jul 1984 AmCin article noted that Spielberg spent four months storyboarding and location scouting in advance of the spring 1983 shoot. On 14 Apr 1983, the Philadelphia Inquirer announced that Spielberg left the previous day on a five-month trip to Sri Lanka, Hong Kong, and London, England. Principal photography began in Sri Lanka the following week, on 18 Apr 1983, according to a 15 Apr 1983 DV production chart. It was later stated in various sources, including the 20 May 1984 NYT, that Macau, not Hong Kong, stood in for Shanghai, China. According to end credits, shooting also took place on Mammoth Mountain in CA, and in unspecified areas of CA around the Tuolomne and American Rivers. The Boston Globe noted that the picture “was made amid utmost secrecy.”
       While production was based in Sri Lanka, dailies were shipped to London for processing, and reviewed by Lucasfilm employees. Prints of dailies were not sent back to Sri Lanka due to an overly long three-day turnaround period. Approximately sixty Sri Lankan army members were hired as background actors, and were paid less than Screen Extras Guild scale, as noted in the 29 Feb 1984 DV. Locations in Sri Lanka included the site of a particularly dangerous stunt: a real-life rope bridge that spanned a river gorge, three-hundred feet above water.
       Despite three months of training for the physically demanding role, Harrison Ford was incapacitated midway through the shoot. According to the 20 May 1984 NYT, Ford blamed his back injury on an elephant-riding scene, which reportedly reactivated a pre-existing ruptured disk in his spine. As noted in a 4 Mar 1994 DV article, George Lucas was asked to fly from his home in Northern CA to set in England to address the problem. Ford wanted to continue with production despite his pain, but was encouraged to fly back to Los Angeles, CA, for surgery. The 6 Jul 1983 Var announced his departure from set, and noted that the actor would be gone two weeks. However, recovery from the surgery took six weeks. A 10 Aug 1983 Var “Hollywood Soundtrack” column announced that Ford had resumed filming at Thorn EMI-Elstree Studios, where the production took up all of the facility’s nine soundstages.
       In Ford’s absence, stunt arranger-stuntman Vic Armstrong served as his double. Armstrong’s resemblance to Ford was said to be uncanny, and even Spielberg could not tell the difference between the two from five feet away. In Empire magazine, Armstrong noted that Spielberg shot him as close up as five feet, and even closer in certain costumes. Over-the-shoulder close-ups required the stuntman to deliver Ford’s lines, so that the side of his face could be seen moving.
       For the scene in which Willie follows Indiana Jones and Short Round into Pankot Palace’s secret tunnel system, Kate Capshaw was covered in 2,000 live bugs, as noted in the Pittsburg Tribune-Review. To shoot the ordeal as quickly as possible, a two-camera set up was used. An additional scene involving a snake was cut from the shooting schedule after Capshaw allegedly suffered panic attacks in anticipation of filming it. For the stone mining sequence, a full-scale mine train was built at Elstree Studios, while visual effects supervisor Dennis Muren created a smaller, matching version for miniature shots. The full-scale model was electrically driven and fully functioning, and ran on a circular track that resembled a rollercoaster. A second dolly track for the camera was built alongside the train track. For safety reasons, the locomotive did not exceed ten miles per hour, but with the camera filming it against a rock wall, it appeared to be moving much faster. Different colored light gels were used in sequential takes on the circular track, to make it seem as if the actors were traveling through different parts of the mine. It took only twenty-five seconds for the train to complete the loop, and some of the action was filmed at twelve-to-eighteen frames per second, faster than the standard twenty-four frames per second, thus one loop on the track might result in only twelve seconds of film. The final edit of the chase sequence lasts approximately seven minutes.
       In a Jul 1984 AmCin article, Spielberg described the low-lighting scheme he and director of photography Douglas Slocombe achieved inside the Temple of Doom, using arc lights, 10 kilowatt lights, and smaller “baby” lights. Due to the “fast 94” film stock that was used, sometimes the light given off by an actual torch was all that was needed.
       Like its predecessor, the prequel was financed and distributed by Paramount Pictures. The budget was listed as $27 million in a 16 Jan 1984 DV chart, and later as $27.5--$28.2 million. In AmCin, Spielberg was quoted as saying, “We had a budget of $28 million, and we delivered Paramount a $28 million movie.” He also noted that principal photography was completed five days under schedule. The 29 Feb 1984 DV stated that $1 million of the budget was spent in Sri Lanka.
       Ford’s agreement to reprise the role of Indiana Jones in a third installment of the franchise was announced in the 23 Nov 1983 Var, shortly after filming was completed. The 20 May 1984 NYT noted that Vic Armstrong had also committed to a third sequel.
       The initial rough cut of the film was approximately 130 minutes long, according to Spielberg in AmCin. The director later showed a 115-minute version to George Lucas, and the two agreed that the pace was too fast. Additional matte shots were filmed, including an establishing shot of Pankot Palace, to “decelerate the action.” The final running time was 118 minutes.
       Controversy arose over the film’s rating of PG (parental guidance suggested) from the Motion Picture Association of America (MPAA). Arguing that the picture was not suitable for children under fourteen, Spielberg called for a PG-14 rating to be added to the rating system and applied to the film, to bar younger viewers from seeing it in theaters. Gremlins (1984, see entry), another upcoming release that was executive produced by Spielberg, spurned similar controversy as a PG-rated film with excessive violence and gore. Although a PG-14 rating was not applied to either film, the MPAA established a PG-13 rating soon after, and the first PG-13 picture to be released, in Aug 1984, was Red Dawn (see entry). In the meantime, to mitigate potential backlash, Paramount Pictures added a warning to advertisements for Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom, stating, “This film may be too intense for younger children.”
       Beginning 14 May 1984, the film was promoted in a week-long series hosted by movie critic Gene Shalit on the morning show, Today (NBC, 1952-- ). The series included interviews with Spielberg.
       The film premiered in Los Angeles on 22 May 1984 at Mann’s Chinese Theatre, as noted in an 18 May 1984 DV brief. Proceeds from the event went to the Pacific-Asian American Youth Services Coalition. In Seattle, WA, the film had a local premiere at the Seattle Film Festival, with a midnight showing on 22 May 1984, before the general release the following day, according to the 14 May 1984 DV.
       Critical reception was mixed. Many reviewers condemned the film’s violence, especially numerous scenes showing children in peril, and complained of racist overtones in the depiction of Indian culture. Willie Scott was also generally seen as an annoying character who screamed too much, and was called “easily the weakest female character in the series” in the 18 May 2008 LADN. Others, including movie critic Roger Ebert, defended the film as highly entertaining, and Ford received consistent praise for his charismatic portrayal of the beloved Indiana Jones.
       Indian actor Roshan Seth stated in Empire that he received flak for taking a role in a film that portrayed Indians as bug-eating savages, but Seth defended Spielberg, noting that the controversial banquet scene in which Pankot Palace waiters serve live eels, roasted beetles, monkey brains, and eyeball soup, was intended as a joke. According to Seth, the Indian characters were supposed to appear savvy in their choice to serve foreign guests such dishes, as a comment on the ignorance of outsiders who believed they ate that way; however, Seth lamented that the joke was ultimately too subtle for the film.
       Spielberg eventually reflected that the screenplay, like the second Star Wars film, The Empire Strikes Back (1980, see entry), was a result of Lucas’s “dark period.” In Empire magazine, Lucas noted that, when they began working on Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom, he was in the midst of a divorce from his first wife, Marcia, Spielberg had just broken up with actress Amy Irving, and neither were in “a good mood”; therefore, they tended toward edgier material. Spielberg countered that he was not comfortable with dark material at the time, and although he collaborated with Lucas and married screenwriters Willard Huyck and Gloria Katz on the screenplay, the content “really went against [his] nature in the ‘80s.” When the third sequel, Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade (1989, see entry), was announced, Spielberg was quoted as saying that he wanted to complete the trilogy as well as “apologize for the second [film],” according to LADN.
       Despite tepid critical reception, the picture was an overwhelming box-office success when it opened on 1,685 screens, taking in $45,709,238 in box-office receipts in its first week of release and thereby surpassing Lucas’s latest Star Wars entry, Return of the Jedi (1983, see entry), as the highest one-week grosser in motion-picture history, as touted in a 1 Jun 1984 DV advertisement. Fanatic moviegoers, sometimes dressed as Indiana Jones, stood in line up to two days in advance of the opening, for access to the first midnight screenings on the morning of 23 May 1984. A 27 Jun 1984 WSJ article praised Frank Mancuso, president of Paramount’s Motion Picture Group, for his marketing savvy, and quoted Spielberg as saying Mancuso was “the most successful and creative link between the moviemaker and the theater owner.” In the 1984 summer season, Mancuso was credited with locking down more than twenty-five percent of the nation’s screens with Paramount films, including Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom, Star Trek III: The Search for Spock, and Top Secret! (1984, see entries). Paramount reportedly spent the “relatively modest sum of $4 million” in first-week advertising for Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom, as a result of polling that showed ninety percent of participants were aware of the film in advance of the release, and seventy-five percent intended to see the film in the theater. The LADN cited a cumulative domestic gross of $180 million, and a total of $153 million in foreign box-office receipts. The 28 Jan 1985 NYT stated that the picture earned the second-highest amount in domestic film rentals ($109 million) for 1984, after Ghostbusters (1984, see entry).
       An Academy Award for Visual Effects went to visual effects supervisor Dennis Muren, chief visual effects cameraman for Industrial Light & Magic (ILM) Mike McAlister, modelshop supervisor for ILM Lorne Peterson, and mechanical effects supervisor George Gibbs. Music composer John Williams was nominated for an Academy Award for Music (Original Score).
       As stated in a 30 May 1984 Var brief, newly appointed director of technical services for Lucasfilm Ltd., Clyde McKinney, installed THX sound systems in Mann’s Chinese Theatre and the Mann National Theatre for the opening of Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom.
       Despite success at the box-office, the film’s merchandising did not prove to be as commercially viable as other “blockbuster” films’, according to a 30 Oct 1984 DV article. One of the more popular items was a replica of Indiana Jones’s Stetson hat, but since the hat’s appeal was limited to an older audience, sales were not remarkably high. A novelization, written by James Kahn, was published by Ballantine Books, and a 23 May 1984 Var brief stated that two other Indiana Jones “adventures” were set to be published around the theatrical release. The Ballantine novelization was listed as third on the paperback best sellers list in the 24 Jun 1984 NYT.
       On 27 Nov 1984, six months after the film opened, a television special titled Heroes and Sidekicks – Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom aired on CBS (Columbia Broadcasting System). The program, which highlighted the relationship of Indiana Jones and Short Round, looked at other famous pairings in films, and was narrated by actor William Shatner, and produced in association with Lucasfilm Ltd.
       A fourth sequel in the Indiana Jones series, Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull, was released in 2008 (see entry).
       End credits include: “Thanks to the governments of Sri Lanka and Macau for their help; photographed at Thorn EMI-Elstree Studios, Borehamwood, England, and on location in Sri Lanka, Macau, Mammoth Mountain and the Tuolomne and American Rivers in California”; “Thanks to Balfour Beatty Nuttal Victoria Project, Sri Lanka”; and, “Thanks to Reed Smoot.”
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BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
American Cinematographer
Jul 1984.
---
Boston Globe
3 May 1983
p. 1.
Boston Globe
17 May 1984
p. 1.
Daily Variety
15 Apr 1983.
---
Daily Variety
20 Dec 1983
p. 1, 26.
Daily Variety
16 Jan 1984
p. 8.
Daily Variety
29 Feb 1984
p. 6.
Daily Variety
14 May 1984.
---
Daily Variety
18 May 1984.
---
Daily Variety
1 Jun 1984
p. 5.
Daily Variety
30 Oct 1984.
---
Daily Variety
4 Mar 1994
p. 22.
Daily Variety
20 May 1997.
---
Empire
May 2008.
---
Hollywood Reporter
11 May 1984
p. 4, 25.
Los Angeles Daily News
18 May 2008
Section L, p. 1.
Los Angeles Times
23 May 1984
p. 1.
New York Times
10 Mar 1983
Section C, p. 20.
New York Times
20 May 1984
Section A, p. 1.
New York Times
21 May 1984
Section C, p. 12.
New York Times
23 May 1984
p. 21.
New York Times
30 May 1984
Section C, p. 17.
New York Times
24 Jun 1984
Section A, p. 40.
New York Times
27 Nov 1984
Section C, p. 18.
New York Times
28 Jan 1985
Section C, p. 11.
Philadelphia Inquirer
14 Apr 1983
Section E, p. 3.
Philadelphia Inquirer
6 May 1984
Section M, p. 12.
Philadelphia Inquirer
14 May 1984
Section D, p. 8.
Pittsburgh Tribune-Review
18 May 2008.
---
Variety
6 Jul 1983
p. 36.
Variety
10 Aug 1983
p. 28.
Variety
23 Nov 1983.
---
Variety
16 May 1984
p. 26.
Variety
23 May 1984.
---
Variety
30 May 1984.
---
WSJ
1 May 1984
p. 1.
WSJ
27 Jun 1984
p. 1.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
Paramount Pictures Presents
A Lucasfilm Ltd. Production
A Steven Spielberg Film
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
2d unit dir
2d unit dir, 2d unit-London
2d unit dir, California
2d unit dir, Aerial unit
Unit mgr, Sri Lanka
Prod mgr, United Kingdom prod crew
Prod mgr, United States prod crew
Prod mgr, Macau
Prod mgr, Sri Lanka
Asst dir, United Kingdom prod crew
Asst dir, Asian unit-Macau & Sri Lanka
Asst dir, Macau
Asst dir, Sri Lanka
1st asst dir, United States prod crew
1st asst dir, 2d unit-London
1st asst dir, 2d unit-London
2d asst dir, United Kingdom prod crew
2d asst dir, United Kingdom prod crew
2d asst dir, United States prod crew
2d asst dir, Asian unit-Macau & Sri Lanka
PRODUCERS
Exec prod
Exec prod
Assoc prod
WRITERS
Story
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Dir of photog, California
Dir of photog, Aerial unit
Addl photog
Steadicam® photog, Sri Lanka
Operating cam
Operating cam
Operating cam, 2d unit-London
Operating cam, California
Operating cam, California
Asst cam
Asst cam
Asst cam, 2d unit-London
1st asst cam, California
2d asst cam
2d asst cam
2d asst cam, 2d unit-London
Dolly grip
Dolly grip
Dolly grip, 2d unit-London
Cam maintenance
Gaffer
Gaffer, 2d unit-London
Gaffer, California
Best boy
Rigging gaffer
Key grip, California
Raft cam mounts, California
Stillsman
Stills photog, California
Stills photog, Macau
Lighting equip and crew from
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des
Chief art dir
Art dir
Art dir, California
Art dir, Sri Lanka
Asst art dir
Asst art dir
Prod illustrator
Prod illustrator
FILM EDITORS
Asst film ed
Asst film ed
Asst film ed
Negative cutter
Negative cutter
Negative cutter
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Draughtsman
Const mgr
Prop master
Prop master, California
Scenic artist
Prod buyer
Chief modeller
Modeller
Modeller
Modeller
Modeller
Chargehand standby props
Chargehand standby props
Chargehand dressing props
Chargehand dressing props
Prop storeman
Standby prop
Standby prop, 2d unit-London
Standby prop, 2d unit-London
Asst const mgr
Const storeman
Master carpenter
Master plasterer
Supv chargehand plasterer
Master painter
Supv rigger
Supv stagehand
Standby carpenter
Standby carpenter, 2d unit-London
Standby plasterer
Standby plasterer, 2d unit-London
Standby painter
Standby painter, 2d unit-London
Standby rigger
Standby rigger, 2d unit-London
Standby stagehand
Standby stagehand, 2d unit-London
Drapes
COSTUMES
Cost des
Ward supv
Asst cost des
Ward mistress
Ward mistress, California
Ward master
MUSIC
Supv mus ed
Mus rec mixer
Mus rec consultant
SOUND
Sd des
Sd mixer
Sd mixer, California
Sd mixer, Sri Lanka
Boom op, Sri Lanka
Sd boom op, California
Sd maintenance
Sd maintenance, Sri Lanka
Post-prod sd services provided by
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Supv dial ed
Dial ed
Sd eff ed
Sd eff ed
Sd eff ed
Sd eff ed
Asst sd ed
Asst sd ed
Asst sd ed
Asst sd ed
Asst sd ed
Sd asst
Sd asst
Foley artist
Audio eng
Audio eng
Audio tech
Audio tech
Audio tech
Audio tech
Sprocket Systems admin
Sprocket Systems admin
Sprocket Systems admin
Sprocket Systems admin
VISUAL EFFECTS
Visual eff supv
Mechanical eff supv
Chief SFX. tech
Floor eff supv
Floor eff supv, 2d unit-London
Sr SFX. tech
Sr SFX. tech
SFX. tech
SFX. tech
SFX. tech
SFX. asst
SFX. asst
SFX. asst
Chief SFX. wireman
SFX. supv, California
Visual eff prod at
Chief visual eff cam, ILM
Opt photog supv, ILM
Gen mgr, ILM
Prod supv, ILM
Matte painting supv, ILM
Modelshop supv, ILM
Stop motion anim, ILM
Supv stage tech, ILM
Anim supv
Supv visual eff ed, ILM
Visual eff cam, ILM
Asst cam, ILM
Asst cam, ILM
Asst cam, ILM
Asst cam, ILM
Prod coord, ILM
Stage coord, ILM
Opt cam op, ILM
Opt cam op, ILM
Opt cam op, ILM
Opt line-up, ILM
Opt line-up, ILM
Opt line-up, ILM
Lab tech, ILM
Lab tech, ILM
Lab tech, ILM
Eff creative consultant, ILM
Stop motion tech, ILM
Stop motion tech, ILM
Stop motion tech, ILM
Matte artist, ILM
Matte artist, ILM
Matte artist, ILM
Matte cam supv, ILM
Matte photog, ILM
Matte photog, ILM
Storyboard artist, ILM
Storyboard artist, ILM
Chief model maker, ILM
Chief model maker, ILM
Chief model maker, ILM
Chief model maker, ILM
Chief model maker, ILM
Model maker, ILM
Model maker, ILM
Model maker, ILM
Model maker, ILM
Model maker, ILM
Model maker, ILM
Model maker, ILM
Model maker, ILM
Model maker, ILM
Model maker, ILM
Model maker, ILM
Model maker, ILM
Head eff anim, ILM
Eff anim, ILM
Eff anim, ILM
Eff anim, ILM
Eff anim, ILM
Eff anim, ILM
Eff anim, ILM
Visual eff ed, ILM
Asst eff ed, ILM
Addl photog, ILM
Stage tech, ILM
Stage tech, ILM
Stage tech, ILM
Stage tech, ILM
Stage tech, ILM
Stage tech, ILM
Stage tech, ILM
Stage tech, ILM
Miniature pyrotechnics, ILM
Miniature pyrotechnics, ILM
Miniature pyrotechnics, ILM
Still photog, ILM
Still photog, ILM
Still photog, ILM
Engineering, ILM
Engineering, ILM
Engineering, ILM
Engineering, ILM
Engineering, ILM
Machine shop, ILM
Machine shop, ILM
Loc coord, ILM
Admin staff, ILM
Admin staff, ILM
Admin staff, ILM
Admin staff, ILM
Admin staff, ILM
Admin staff, ILM
Admin staff, ILM
Admin staff, ILM
Admin staff, ILM
Eff processing
Titles and addl opt eff
Addl opt line-up
MAKEUP
Makeup supv
Chief makeup artist
Chief makeup artist, 2d unit-London
Makeup artist
Makeup artist
Makeup artist
Makeup artist, California
Chief hairdresser
Hairdresser
Hairdresser, 2d unit-London
Hairdresser, California
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
Casting
Casting
Prod supv, United Kingdom prod crew
Prod supv, Macau
Prod supv, Sri Lanka
Prod controller
Asst to prod controller
Marketing and promotion
Scr supv, Asian unit-Macau & Sri Lanka
Prod secy
Prod secy, Sri Lanka
Prod's secy, California
Unit pub
Prod accountant
Prod accountant, California
Prod accountant, California
Loc accountant
Asst prod accountant
Research
Asst to Mr. Lucas
Asst to Mr. Marshall
Asst to Ms. Kennedy
Asst to Mr. Spielberg
Asst to Mr. Spielberg
Secy to Mr. Watts
Prod's asst, California
Studio teacher
Studio teacher
Transport mgr
Transportation co-ord, California
Animal handler
Marketing coord
Loc mgr, California
Loc mgr, Macau
Loc mgr, Sri Lanka
Prod co-ord, California
Ski unit co-ord, California
Facilities in Macau supplied by
Facilities in Sri Lanka supplied by
Pilot, Aerial unit
Pilot, Aerial unit
Pilot, Aerial unit
Jump master, Aerial unit
Physical conditioning for Mr. Ford by
Catering by
Auburn Duesenberg constructed by
Prod vehicles courtesy of
Air transportation by
Air transportation by
STAND INS
Stunt arranger-Studio
Stunt arranger-Location
Mr. Ford's stand-in
Stunt co-ord, California
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
COLOR PERSONNEL
Col timer
Col timer
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the film Raiders of the Lost Ark written by Lawrence Kasdan (Paramount Pictures Corp. & Lucasfilm, 1981).
SONGS
"Anything Goes," music & lyrics by Cole Porter.
COMPOSER
DETAILS
Series:
Alternate Title:
Indiana Jones and the Temple of Death
Release Date:
23 May 1984
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles premiere: 22 May 1984
Los Angeles and New York openings: 23 May 1984
Production Date:
began 18 April 1983
Copyright Claimant:
Lucasfilm, Ltd.
Copyright Date:
11 June 1984
Copyright Number:
PA214349
Physical Properties:
Sound
Dolby Stereo ® in Selected Theatres
Color
Lenses
Lenses and Panaflex® Cameras by Panavision®
Prints
Prints by Deluxe®
Duration(in mins):
118
MPAA Rating:
PG
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
27401
SYNOPSIS

In 1935 Shanghai, China, archaeologist-professor Indiana “Indy” Jones meets crime lord Lao Che at a nightclub. Indy has brought the valuable ashes of Nurhaci, the first emperor of the Manchu dynasty, in exchange for a large diamond. The men are interrupted by Willie Scott, a coquettish American singer performing at the club. When Che reneges on his side of the deal, Indy takes Willie hostage, prompting the crime boss to relinquish the diamond. However, Che laughingly announces that he has just poisoned Indy, and demands the precious gem back in exchange for a vial of antidote. Disguised as a waiter, Indy’s cohort, Wu Han, attempts to shoot Che, but one of Che’s henchmen fires at Wu Han first. A melee ensues, with Indy scrambling on the dance floor in search of the antidote, and Willie desperately chasing after the diamond. From across the room, Indy sees Willie retrieve the antidote and tuck it inside her dress. The two narrowly escape a throng of gunmen, jumping from the building into an awaiting car driven by Indy’s child sidekick, Short Round, aka “Shorty.” After a treacherous drive to the airport, they unwittingly board a plane owned by Lao Che, and wake up mid-flight to find the pilots have drained the fuel tank and parachuted out of the aircraft. As the plane nearly crashes into snowy mountain peaks, Indy finds an inflatable raft, and instructs Shorty and Willie to hang on to him as they leap together from the plane. The raft cushions the blow as the three land in the snow, slide downhill, and fly off a cliff, into a river. The water carries them to an impoverished village in India, ... +


In 1935 Shanghai, China, archaeologist-professor Indiana “Indy” Jones meets crime lord Lao Che at a nightclub. Indy has brought the valuable ashes of Nurhaci, the first emperor of the Manchu dynasty, in exchange for a large diamond. The men are interrupted by Willie Scott, a coquettish American singer performing at the club. When Che reneges on his side of the deal, Indy takes Willie hostage, prompting the crime boss to relinquish the diamond. However, Che laughingly announces that he has just poisoned Indy, and demands the precious gem back in exchange for a vial of antidote. Disguised as a waiter, Indy’s cohort, Wu Han, attempts to shoot Che, but one of Che’s henchmen fires at Wu Han first. A melee ensues, with Indy scrambling on the dance floor in search of the antidote, and Willie desperately chasing after the diamond. From across the room, Indy sees Willie retrieve the antidote and tuck it inside her dress. The two narrowly escape a throng of gunmen, jumping from the building into an awaiting car driven by Indy’s child sidekick, Short Round, aka “Shorty.” After a treacherous drive to the airport, they unwittingly board a plane owned by Lao Che, and wake up mid-flight to find the pilots have drained the fuel tank and parachuted out of the aircraft. As the plane nearly crashes into snowy mountain peaks, Indy finds an inflatable raft, and instructs Shorty and Willie to hang on to him as they leap together from the plane. The raft cushions the blow as the three land in the snow, slide downhill, and fly off a cliff, into a river. The water carries them to an impoverished village in India, where a shaman beseeches Indy to help his ailing people. As Willie rattles off a stream of complaints about her bad fortune, Indy listens with compassion to the shaman, who believes Indy was sent by the god Shiva to save the village. The shaman explains that the new maharajah at nearby Pankot Palace has stolen the villagers’ prized sivalinga stone, thus causing their wells to run dry, ruining their crops, and killing off their animals. In addition, all the children have been kidnapped. Indy asks for a guide to take him and his friends to Delhi, but the shaman will only grant them a guide if they go first to Pankot Palace, to look for the sivalinga. That night, an emaciated child returns to the village from Pankot Palace, carrying a torn piece of fabric and uttering the word “Sankara.” Indy studies the painting on the fabric and deduces that the sivalinga is one of the famed Sankara Stones, known for their magical powers. In the morning, he agrees to make the journey to Pankot. Willie does not want to go, but has no choice in the matter. She joins Indy and Shorty as they travel by elephant and camp overnight in the jungle. Although Willie is tormented by the dangerous animals she encounters, Indy and Shorty do their best to ignore her. After Shorty goes to sleep, Willie asks Indy why he agreed to help the shaman. Indy shows her the piece of fabric from the emaciated boy, and says it was torn from an old manuscript about the Sankara Stones. He confesses that if the sivalinga is one of the Sankara Stones, the artifact could bring him “fortune and glory.” The following day, Indy notices an evil-looking statue in the jungle near Pankot Palace. Arriving at the palace steps, his group is greeted by Chattar Lal, prime minister for the maharajah. Lal recognizes Indy’s name, and welcomes him and his friends to stay. That evening, Indy, Willie, and Shorty join Lal and Captain Blumburtt, an inspector for the British army, at an elaborate banquet dinner. Although Willie hoped to seduce the wealthy maharaja, she is shocked to discover the prince, whose name is Zalim Singh, is only a boy. Waiters serve a snake filled with live eels, roasted beetles, eyeball soup, and monkey brains for dessert. Repulsed by the food, Willie faints at the table. Indy questions Chattar Lal about some artifacts he noticed in the palace, which appear to be related to the infamous Thuggee cult, who worshipped the goddess Kali. Lal insists the Thuggees have been defunct for a century, and the maharajah claims that Thuggee artifacts are displayed only to remind residents that such evil will never happen again. Later, Indy checks on Willie in her room and the two kiss, but she throws him out for making an arrogant remark. Afterward, Indy is attacked by an assassin. With Shorty’s help, he fights him off. He returns to Willie’s room to check for more assassins, and stumbles upon a secret passageway to a tunnel system. Indy and Shorty explore the tunnels, teeming with large insects. They discover the network of passageways is booby-trapped, as they are shut inside a chamber with a spiked ceiling that lowers and nearly crushes them. Indy calls for Willie’s help and she braves the insects just in time to rescue her companions. They move deeper into the tunnels and discover a cavernous temple in which a Thuggee ceremony, led by High Priest Mola Ram, is taking place. The three watch in horror as worshippers pray to the goddess Kali. Mola Ram approaches a man trapped in a cage and pulls his heart from his chest. Magically, the man’s wound heals itself, and he remains alive until his cage is lowered into a pit of hot lava. During the human sacrifice, three illuminated stones are placed into a shrine. When the ceremony has concluded, Indy sneaks into the temple and steals the talismans, which he identifies by their markings as three of the five Sankara Stones. Willie and Shorty are taken captive by Thuggees, as Indy discovers the mine where the missing village children have been enslaved as workers. Mola Ram appears, and informs Indy that the children are mining for the final two Sankara Stones. Restrained by guards, Indy is force-fed the “blood of Kali,” a potion that transforms him into a submissive follower. Shorty is sent to work in the mines, while Willie is caged. Shorty breaks free of his chains just in time to witness the dazed Indy operating a wheel that lowers Willie’s cage into the pit of lava. In desperation, Shorty burns Indy with a torch, thus transforming him back to his regular self. They fight off the Thuggees, including Prime Minister Chattar Lal, and save Willie. The three return to the mine to free the enslaved children, who flee the palace on foot. Indy and his friends stay behind to fight off the guards. Shorty notices the maharajah manipulating a voodoo doll that causes Indy pain. The boy attacks the prince and burns him with a torch. The spell of the “blood of Kali” lifts, and the maharajah transforms back into a good-hearted young man. Shorty joins Indy and Willie in a mine train cart as they escape their remaining attackers. Indy stops the cart just before they are sent flying through an opening in the cave walls. Emerging from the mine, they step onto a high cliff overlooking a river gorge. Indy points Willie and Shorty in the direction of a rope bridge leading to land, and they make their way across it, only to be stopped by Thuggees at the other end. Behind them, Indy makes it halfway across the bridge, but is trapped on both sides by approaching Thuggees. Willie and Shorty are sent back onto the bridge, and Indy warns them to grab on as he slices it in half with a sword. The two sides of the bridge plummet, sending many of the attackers into the gorge, where predatory crocodiles await. Willie, Shorty, and Indy struggle up the dangling rope bridge. Indy fights with Mola Ram, who tries to retrieve the Sankara Stones from Indy’s bag. As they tussle, Ram and two of the stones fall into the river. Indy makes it back to land with the remaining stone. Instead of using it to attain fortune and glory, he returns it to the shaman. Prosperity is restored, just as the freed child slaves descend on the village and reunite with their parents. Willie claims she wants nothing more to do with Indy’s adventures, but he uses his whip to rope her in for a kiss. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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