Daisy Miller (1974)

G | 90-91 mins | Drama | 1974

Full page view
HISTORY

The end credits contain the following written statement: "We are indebted to the citizens of Rome, Italy and Vevey, Switzerland."
       A 22 Jun 1973 DV “Just for Variety” column announced that Cloris Leachman was cast to play the mother of Cybill Shepherd’s character in the film. The actresses previously worked together with director Peter Bogdanovich in his 1971 film The Last Picture Show (see entry).
       According to a 30 Aug 1973 HR news item, a two-week rehearsal period preceded the production’s late Aug 1973 start in Rome, Italy. A 25 Jul 1973 DV brief stated that filming would move to Vevey, Switzerland, in Oct 1973.
       Critical reception for Daisy Miller was mixed. Reviewers generally agreed that supporting players, namely Leachman, Mildred Natwick, and Eileen Brennan, turned in strong performances. However, in a 17 May 1974 HR review, Alan J. Howard accused Sheperd and her co-star, Barry Brown, of rendering the film “lifeless and ... More Less

The end credits contain the following written statement: "We are indebted to the citizens of Rome, Italy and Vevey, Switzerland."
       A 22 Jun 1973 DV “Just for Variety” column announced that Cloris Leachman was cast to play the mother of Cybill Shepherd’s character in the film. The actresses previously worked together with director Peter Bogdanovich in his 1971 film The Last Picture Show (see entry).
       According to a 30 Aug 1973 HR news item, a two-week rehearsal period preceded the production’s late Aug 1973 start in Rome, Italy. A 25 Jul 1973 DV brief stated that filming would move to Vevey, Switzerland, in Oct 1973.
       Critical reception for Daisy Miller was mixed. Reviewers generally agreed that supporting players, namely Leachman, Mildred Natwick, and Eileen Brennan, turned in strong performances. However, in a 17 May 1974 HR review, Alan J. Howard accused Sheperd and her co-star, Barry Brown, of rendering the film “lifeless and uninteresting.”
More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
27 May 1974
p. 4691.
Daily Variety
22 Jun 1973.
---
Daily Variety
25 Jul 1973.
---
Daily Variety
27 Jun 1974.
---
Hollywood Reporter
25 Jul 1973.
---
Hollywood Reporter
24 Aug 1973
p. 16.
Hollywood Reporter
30 Aug 1973.
---
Hollywood Reporter
9 Nov 1973
p. 12.
Hollywood Reporter
17 May 1974
p. 3, 20.
LAHExam
3 Jul 1974.
---
Los Angeles Times
18 May 1974.
---
Los Angeles Times
3 Jul 1974
Section IV, p. 1, 11.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
22 May 1974
p. 102.
New York Times
23 May 1974
p. 52.
Newsweek
27 May 1974
p. 81.
Time
3 Jun 1974
p. 56.
Variety
22 May 1974
p. 18.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANIES
PRODUCTION TEXT
A Peter Bogdanovich Production
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Prod mgr
Asst dir
2d asst dir
PRODUCERS
Assoc prod
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Asst cam
Gaffer
Key grip
ART DIRECTOR
FILM EDITORS
SET DECORATORS
Set dresser
Propmaster
COSTUMES
Cost des
Ward supv
Miss Shepherd's cost by
SOUND
Sd ed
MAKEUP
Hairstylist
PRODUCTION MISC
Asst to Mr. Bogdanovich
Transportation mgr
Scr girl
Loc mgr
Prod asst
Prod asst
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the novella Daisy Miller by Henry James (New York, 1879).
AUTHOR
MUSIC
Music from Johann Sebastian Bach, Luigi Boccherini, Franz Joseph Haydn, Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, Franz Schubert, Johann Strauss and Giuseppe Verdi.
SONGS
"When You and I Were Young, Maggie," by G.W. Johnson and J.A. Butterfield.
DETAILS
Release Date:
1974
Premiere Information:
New York opening: 22 May 1974 at the Baronet Theater
Los Angeles opening: 3 July 1974 at the Bruin Theatre
Production Date:
20 August--early November 1973 in Italy and Switzerland
Physical Properties:
Sound
Color
Eastmancolor
Duration(in mins):
90-91
MPAA Rating:
G
Countries:
Italy, United States
Language:
English
SYNOPSIS

In Vevey, Switzerland, Randolph C. Miller, a young American boy, runs around a hotel by himself. On the outdoor patio, he asks another American, Frederick Winterbourn, for a lump of sugar. When Annie P. Miller, known as “Daisy,” saunters onto the patio carrying a parasol, Randolph identifies her as his older sister. Frederick engages Daisy in conversation and learns that she and Randolph are from upstate New York, and plan to visit Italy after their stay in Switzerland. Daisy chats nonstop, hardly allowing Frederick time to respond to her questions. They make plans to visit Chillon, a nearby castle. Later, Frederick’s aunt, Mrs. Costello, tells him that the Miller family are not well-mannered. She criticizes Daisy and her mother’s familiarity with their European courier, Eugenio, and suspects they may even dine with him. Frederick tells her about the plans he made to go to Chillon with Daisy, and she reprimands him. After dinner at the hotel, Frederick finds Daisy on the patio. Based on Frederick’s description of his aunt, Daisy suspects she disapproves of her but tells him not to worry. When Daisy introduces her mother to Frederick and mentions their upcoming date, Mrs. Miller drones on, in the same manner as her daughter, about her reasons for not visiting the castle. As in conversation with Daisy, Frederick finds it difficult to interrupt. Daisy begs Frederick to take her out on a boat, but Mrs. Miller does not approve. Eugenio arrives and, at Mrs. Miller’s command, forbids Daisy to go on the boat. Daisy leaves with her mother and Eugenio, telling Frederick she hopes the disappointment doesn’t keep him awake. One morning, Frederick and Daisy run to catch the ... +


In Vevey, Switzerland, Randolph C. Miller, a young American boy, runs around a hotel by himself. On the outdoor patio, he asks another American, Frederick Winterbourn, for a lump of sugar. When Annie P. Miller, known as “Daisy,” saunters onto the patio carrying a parasol, Randolph identifies her as his older sister. Frederick engages Daisy in conversation and learns that she and Randolph are from upstate New York, and plan to visit Italy after their stay in Switzerland. Daisy chats nonstop, hardly allowing Frederick time to respond to her questions. They make plans to visit Chillon, a nearby castle. Later, Frederick’s aunt, Mrs. Costello, tells him that the Miller family are not well-mannered. She criticizes Daisy and her mother’s familiarity with their European courier, Eugenio, and suspects they may even dine with him. Frederick tells her about the plans he made to go to Chillon with Daisy, and she reprimands him. After dinner at the hotel, Frederick finds Daisy on the patio. Based on Frederick’s description of his aunt, Daisy suspects she disapproves of her but tells him not to worry. When Daisy introduces her mother to Frederick and mentions their upcoming date, Mrs. Miller drones on, in the same manner as her daughter, about her reasons for not visiting the castle. As in conversation with Daisy, Frederick finds it difficult to interrupt. Daisy begs Frederick to take her out on a boat, but Mrs. Miller does not approve. Eugenio arrives and, at Mrs. Miller’s command, forbids Daisy to go on the boat. Daisy leaves with her mother and Eugenio, telling Frederick she hopes the disappointment doesn’t keep him awake. One morning, Frederick and Daisy run to catch the ferryboat heading to Chillon. At the castle, Frederick tells her he went to school in Geneva as a boy and has lived in Europe ever since. After he recites a poem, Daisy decides he would be a good teacher for Randolph and suggests he accompany her family to Italy, but he declines, saying he must return to Geneva. Agitated by the rejection, Daisy storms outside where Frederick catches up to her. She demands to know if he has a romantic interest in Geneva but Frederick denies it. Calming down, she asks him to meet her when her family is in Rome, and he agrees. Sometime later, Frederick visits his aunt at her new apartment in Rome. She supplies him with gossip about Daisy, namely that she has been associating with an Italian gentleman. Frederick attends a tea party at the home of Mrs. Walker, and encounters Daisy there. The hostess is irritated as Daisy flirts with Frederick and urges him to escort her to her next destination. Soon after, Mrs. Walker spies from a nearby carriage as Frederick and Daisy meet her Italian friend, Mr. Giovanelli, in a park. The trio walk, arm in arm, with Daisy in the middle. Mrs. Walker sends a messenger to Frederick who goes to her carriage, where she informs him that Daisy is embarrassing herself and should come to the carriage at once. Daisy comes over with Giovanelli and introduces him, but Mrs. Walker orders her into the carriage, saying her reputation is in danger as long as she stays out with the two men. Daisy refuses and asks Frederick what he thinks, and he agrees with Mrs. Walker. Peeved, Daisy leaves with Giovanelli. Mrs. Walker insists Frederick get into the carriage. As they drive away, she tells him everyone in town is talking about Daisy and her reckless behavior. Frederick agrees that Daisy’s family seems tasteless, but insists that he likes her regardless. Disappointed, Mrs. Walker allows Frederick to leave the carriage and rejoin Daisy and Giovanelli. Before he catches up to them, however, Giovanelli spots him and uses Daisy’s parasol to block Frederick’s view. One night, Mrs. Miller arrives at Mrs. Walker’s home for a party, apologizes that her daughter is late, and explains that she has been singing and playing piano with Giovanelli at their hotel. Later, Daisy and her Italian suitor arrive, and she insists that he sing for Mrs. Walker’s guests. While Giovanelli performs, Frederick finds Daisy and warns her that her actions are improper, saying that flirting is an American custom, unacceptable in European society. Daisy rejects his advice and reunites with Giovanelli after his performance. When Daisy departs with her mother and Giovanelli, Mrs. Walker ignores their goodbyes, telling Frederick that Daisy will never be invited to her home again. Frederick later visits Daisy at her hotel and notices two bellboys snickering at him, assuming he’s another of her many suitors. Frederick runs into his aunt, and they observe Daisy walking with Giovanelli. His aunt again discourages Frederick from associating with her. One day, at the Millers’ hotel suite, Frederick visits with Daisy and Giovanelli, who are at the piano, playing “Pop Goes the Weasel.” Giovanni plays a song for Daisy to sing, and Frederick watches, mesmerized. Mrs. Miller returns home and mentions her suspicion that Daisy might be engaged to Giovanelli, and Frederick abruptly leaves. One day, Daisy finds Frederick walking alone and joins him. He informs her that Mrs. Miller mentioned a possible engagement, and Daisy teases him by saying she is engaged and, moments later, denying it. In a carriage at night, Frederick confides to his friend, Charles, that he cannot decide whether Daisy is reckless or exceedingly naïve. Despondent, he leaves the carriage and walks home. On his way, he passes through the Colosseum and runs into Daisy and Giovanelli. He reprimands Giovanelli for bringing her there, as it is a breeding ground for the Roman flu. Frederick criticizes Daisy’s lack of prudence, and she leaves in a huff. At the opera, Frederick overhears a group of women gossiping about Daisy and learns that she has caught the Roman flu. Soon after, Frederick visits the Millers’ hotel suite. Mrs. Miller complains that Giovanelli has disappeared since Daisy became ill and says that Daisy wanted Frederick to know she is definitely not engaged. Sometime later, Frederick mourns alongside Giovanelli, Mrs. Miller, and Randolph at Daisy’s funeral. Giovanelli tells Frederick that Daisy was the most innocent girl he knew but admits she never would have married him. Frederick later expresses to his aunt that he regrets the manner in which he treated Daisy. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

TOP SEARCHES

CASABLANCA

During World War II, Casablanca, Morocco is a waiting point for throngs of desperate refugees fleeing Nazi-occupied Europe. Exit visas, which are necessary to leave the country, are at ... >>

CITIZEN KANE

Seventy-year-old newspaper tycoon Charles Foster Kane dies in his palatial Florida home, Xanadu, after uttering the single word “Rosebud.” While watching a newsreel summarizing the years during which Kane ... >>

REAR WINDOW

Laid up with a broken leg during the height of summer, renowned New York magazine photographer L. B. “Jeff” Jeffries enters his last week of home confinement, bored and ... >>

RAGING BULL

In 1941, at a boxing match in Cleveland, Ohio, pandemonium breaks out when Jake La Motta, an up-and-coming young boxer, loses a decision to Jimmy Reeves, suffering his first ... >>

CITY LIGHTS

At an outdoor dedication ceremony, a tramp is discovered sleeping in the arms of a statue as it is being unveiled before a crowd. He is chased into ... >>

The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.