Demolition Man (1993)

R | 115 mins | Adventure, Science fiction | 8 October 1993

Director:

Marco Brambilla

Cinematographer:

Alex Thomson

Editor:

Stuart Baird

Production Designer:

David L. Snyder

Production Companies:

Warner Bros., Inc., Silver Pictures
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HISTORY

The summary and note for this entry were completed with participation from the AFI Academic Network. Summary and note were written by participant Graham Rhodes, a student at Georgia Institute of Technology, with Melanie Kohnen as academic advisor.
On 17 Dec 1992, the L.B. Press-Telegram cited the scheduled start date of filming as 25 Jan 1993, but according to 25 May 1993 HR production charts, principal photography began 12 Feb 1993 in Los Angeles, California.
       The 24 Oct 1993 LAT noted the film exceeded its original schedule and budget. The article stated that the film took an estimated 112 days to shoot, as opposed to the originally scheduled seventy-five, and the budget increased from $45 million to $60 million. A 26 Jul 1993 DV news item reported the budget started at $18 million, including $4 million for Wesley Snipe’s salary and $10 million for Sylvester Stallone. DV noted that the production was delayed because Snipes was hired late and because Stallone pinched a nerve in his arm while weightlifting in preparation for his nude scenes at the beginning of the film. The news item projected the end of production as July 1993. Although their figures were disputed by Warner Bros., LAT reported on 12 Oct 1993 that the total cost of the film, including seventy-five additional days with a second unit and marketing expenses, was nearly $77 million. LAT noted that producer Joel Silver hired a series of five assistant directors during production and many crew members had to leave before completion because of the extended ... More Less

The summary and note for this entry were completed with participation from the AFI Academic Network. Summary and note were written by participant Graham Rhodes, a student at Georgia Institute of Technology, with Melanie Kohnen as academic advisor.
On 17 Dec 1992, the L.B. Press-Telegram cited the scheduled start date of filming as 25 Jan 1993, but according to 25 May 1993 HR production charts, principal photography began 12 Feb 1993 in Los Angeles, California.
       The 24 Oct 1993 LAT noted the film exceeded its original schedule and budget. The article stated that the film took an estimated 112 days to shoot, as opposed to the originally scheduled seventy-five, and the budget increased from $45 million to $60 million. A 26 Jul 1993 DV news item reported the budget started at $18 million, including $4 million for Wesley Snipe’s salary and $10 million for Sylvester Stallone. DV noted that the production was delayed because Snipes was hired late and because Stallone pinched a nerve in his arm while weightlifting in preparation for his nude scenes at the beginning of the film. The news item projected the end of production as July 1993. Although their figures were disputed by Warner Bros., LAT reported on 12 Oct 1993 that the total cost of the film, including seventy-five additional days with a second unit and marketing expenses, was nearly $77 million. LAT noted that producer Joel Silver hired a series of five assistant directors during production and many crew members had to leave before completion because of the extended schedule. They had previously committed to other projects.
       According to DV on 19 Mar 1993, Lori Petty was originally selected for the role of “Lenina Huxley,” but was fired two days into production for “creative differences” and replaced with Sandra Bullock.
       As discussed in HR on 4 Oct 1993 and 11 Oct 1993, the film's release featured an extensive promotional campaign. In addition to typical Hollywood advertising strategies, producer Joel Silver contracted with General Motors and Taco Bell for product placement, as well as Mattel for a line of toys despite the film’s R-rating. Advertisements were prominently featured on MTV, including a “Demolition Man Jam” contest where winners were invited participate in the demolition of a nine-story building in Louisville, KY. According to a news item in the 5 Oct 1993 HR , Warner Bros. donated $10,000 to the Waterfront Development Corp. in Louisville for allowing Stallone, Snipes and the contest winners to view the explosion. HR noted the film's closing credits featured a remix of musician Sting's 1980s song “Demolition Man” accompanied by a new music video which served as an additional movie tie-in. Trading cards, comic books, and an interactive video game were also used to promote the film. According to HR , the game was innovative because Stallone and Snipes were filmed in live-action sequences performing the moves of their characters.
       On 2 Dec 1993, WSJ reported that references to Taco Bell were replaced with Pizza Hut when the film was released internationally because Taco Bell has very few restaurants outside of the United States and could not provide promotional support in foreign countries. Pizza Hut paid an estimated $250,000 to reedit the film. WSJ pointed out that both Taco Bell and Pizza Hut belonged to the same parent corporation, PepsiCo Inc. Time Warner told WSJ that this was the first time a film was edited after its release for promotional purposes. The article stipulated that Demolition Man marked the most extensive international promotional campaign between a film studio and a fast-food company.
       On 25 Feb 1993, HR announced that the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power building was being demolished for the production. It was the first time in thirty years that the city had approved the demolition of a building with explosives.
       Scenes between “John Spartan” and his daughter were filmed, according to the 18 Oct 1993 issue of Var , with actress Elizabeth Ruscio. However, test audiences found the sub-plot to be too sentimental and the scenes were eliminated from the final cut.
Demolition Man received a largely negative critical reception. The film was ultimately not a financial success despite a strong opening weekend gross of $14.5 million, which according to HR on 11 Oct 1993, was the biggest October opening to date.
       According to a Dec 1993 US Magazine report, a Demolition Man sequel was planned to be released in 1995, but the follow-up never emerged.
More Less

BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
Dec 1993.
---
Daily Variety
19 Mar 1993.
---
Daily Variety
26 Jul 1993.
---
Daily Variety
8 Oct 1993
p. 2, 9.
Daily Variety
23 May 1995.
---
Hollywood Reporter
11 Sep 1992.
---
Hollywood Reporter
2 Feb 1993.
---
Hollywood Reporter
25 Feb 1993.
---
Hollywood Reporter
2 May 1993.
---
Hollywood Reporter
25 May 1993.
---
Hollywood Reporter
6 Jul 1993
p. 10.
Hollywood Reporter
4 Oct 1993.
---
Hollywood Reporter
5 Oct 1993.
---
Hollywood Reporter
8 Oct 1993
p. 6, 24.
Hollywood Reporter
11 Oct 1993.
---
L.B. Press-Telegram
17 Dec 1992.
---
Los Angeles Times
1 Aug 1993.
---
Los Angeles Times
8 Oct 1993
p. 1, 18.
Los Angeles Times
11 Oct 1993.
---
Los Angeles Times
12 Oct 1993.
---
Los Angeles Times
13 Oct 1993.
---
Los Angeles Times
24 Oct 1993
pp. 21-22.
New York Times
8 Oct 1993
p. 23.
US Magazine
December 1993.
---
Variety
18 Oct 1993
p. 50.
WSJ
2 Dec 1993
p. 1, 8.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
2d unit dir
Prod mgr
Unit prod mgr, Second unit
1st asst dir
1st asst dir, Second unit
2d asst dir
2d asst dir
2d asst dir, Second unit
2d 2d asst dir
2d 2d asst dir
PRODUCERS
Exec prod
Exec prod
Exec prod
Exec prod
Assoc prod
Co-prod
Co-prod
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Addl photog
Dir of photog, Second unit
Cam op, Second unit
Cam op, Second unit
Steadicam op
Steadicam op, Second unit
1st asst cam
1st asst cam
1st asst cam, Second unit
1st asst cam, Second unit
2d asst cam
2d asst cam
2d asst cam, Second unit
2d asst cam, Second unit
Still photog
Video assist op
Video assist op
Chief lighting tech
Chief lighting tech, Second unit
Asst chief lighting tech
Rigging gaffer
Key grip, Second unit
Best boy grip
Dolly grip
Dolly grip
Remote crane supplied by
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des
Addl art dir
Asst art dir
Art dept researcher
Art dept researcher
FILM EDITORS
Asst film ed
1st asst ed
Asst ed
Asst ed
Negative cutting by
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Set dec
Set des
Set des
Prop master
Prop master, Second unit
Asst prop master
Asst prop master
Leadman
Prop shop coord
Standby painter
Action props by
Const coord
Const foreman
COSTUMES
Cost des
Cost supv
Cost, Second unit
MUSIC
Supv mus ed
Mus ed
Asst mus ed
Cond
Orch
Score prod by
Score prod by
Score mixer
SOUND
Sd mixer
Sd mixer, Second unit
Boom op
Boom op, Second unit
Cableman
Supv sd ed
Sd eff ed
Sd eff ed
Sd eff ed
Sd eff ed
Sd eff ed
Asst sd eff ed
Asst sd eff ed
Asst sd eff ed
Rerec mixer
Rerec mixer
Rerec mixer
Supv ADR ed
ADR ed
ADR ed
Asst ADR ed
Asst ADR ed
Supv foley ed
Foley ed
Foley ed
Foley ed
Foley ed
Foley mixer
Sd des and digital editing by
Horta ed crew
Horta ed crew
Horta ed crew
Horta ed crew
Horta ed crew
Horta ed crew
VISUAL EFFECTS
Visual eff by
Visual eff by
Spec eff coord
Spec eff foreman
Spec eff foreman
Video and graphic displays by
Video and graphic displays, Video Image
Video and graphic displays, Video Image
Video and graphic displays, Video Image
Video and graphic displays, Video Image
Video Image supv
Video Image playback crew
Video Image playback crew
Video Image playback crew
Video Image playback crew
Video Image playback crew
Video Image playback crew
Video Image playback crew
Video Image playback crew
Video Image playback crew
Opticals
Main and end title des by
Spec body eff des and created by
Spec body eff des and created by
Spec eff body crew
Spec eff body crew
Spec eff body crew
Spec eff body crew
Spec eff body crew
Spec eff body crew
Spec eff body crew
Spec eff body crew
Spec eff body crew
Spec eff body crew
Spec eff body crew
Spec eff body crew
LCD projection panels by
VICOM Prototype provided by
Industrial des by
Ultralite vehicles manufactured by
Visual eff ed
Visual eff
Digital film services provided by
Composite supv, Cinesite
Digital coord, Cinesite
Composite des, Cinesite
Composite des, Cinesite
Digital artist, Cinesite
Digital artist, Cinesite
Digital artist, Cinesite
Digital artist, Cinesite
Anim and digital eff by
Anim des and supv, Available Light, Ltd.
Anim, Available Light, Ltd.
Anim, Available Light, Ltd.
Anim, Available Light, Ltd.
Digital anim, Available Light, Ltd.
Opt printing, Available Light, Ltd.
Cam op, Available Light, Ltd.
Anim coord, Available Light, Ltd.
Computer graphics by
Creative supv, R/Greenberg Associates West, Inc.
Digital visual eff prod, R/Greenberg Associates We
Digital eff coord, R/Greenberg Associates West, In
Computer graphics artist, R/Greenberg Associates W
Computer graphics artist, R/Greenberg Associates W
Computer graphics artist, R/Greenberg Associates W
Computer graphics artist, R/Greenberg Associates W
Computer graphics artist, R/Greenberg Associates W
Matte painting visual eff by
Supv matte artist, Compound i
Digital supv, Compound i
Matte artist, Compound i
Matte painting visual eff by
Matte artist, Matte World
Matte photog, Matte World
Matte cam asst, Matte World
Addl visual eff by
Addl visual eff by
Addl visual eff by
Addl visual eff by
MAKEUP
Makeup supv
Makeup artist
Makeup artist
Makeup artist, Second unit
Hair supv
Hairstylist
Hairstylist, Second unit
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
Casting
Scr supv
Scr supv, Second unit
Loc mgr, Second unit
Asst loc mgr
Aerial coord
Asst to Mr. Silver
Asst to Mr. Silver
Asst to Mr. Brambilla
Asst to Mr. Levy
Asst to Ms. George
Asst to Mr. Stallone
Asst to Mr. Snipes
Prod secy
Asst prod secy
Asst prod secy
Asst prod secy
Asst prod secy
D.G.A. trainee
D.G.A. trainee
Set staff asst
Set staff asst
Set staff asst
Set staff asst
Set staff asst
Staff asst
Staff asst
Staff asst
Staff asst
Staff asst
Prod accountant
Asst accountant
Asst accountant
Casting asst
Transportation coord
Transportation capt
Transportation capt, Second unit
Craft service
Craft service
STAND INS
Stunt performer
Stunt performer
Stunt performer
Stunt performer
Stunt performer
Stunt performer
Stunt performer
Stunt performer
Stunt performer
Stunt performer
Stunt performer
Stunt performer
Stunt performer
Stunt performer
Stunt performer
Stunt performer
Stunt performer
Stunt performer
Stunt performer
Stunt performer
Stunt performer
Stunt performer
Stunt performer
Stunt performer
Stunt performer
Stunt performer
Stunt performer
Stunt performer
Stunt performer
Stunt performer
Stunt performer
Stunt performer
Stunt performer
Stunt performer
Stunt performer
Stunt performer
Stunt performer
Stunt performer
Stunt performer
Stunt performer
Stunt performer
Stunt performer
Stunt performer
Stunt performer
Stunt performer
Stunt performer
Stunt performer
Stunt coord
Stunt coord
COLOR PERSONNEL
Col timer
SOURCES
SONGS
"Demolition Man," written and performed by Sting, courtesy of A&M Records, Inc.
"Plop, Plop, Fizz, Fizz," written by Tom Dawes and Bob Wilvers, courtesy of Miles, Inc.
"The Armour Hot Dog Jingle," courtesy of Armour Swift Eckrich
+
SONGS
"Demolition Man," written and performed by Sting, courtesy of A&M Records, Inc.
"Plop, Plop, Fizz, Fizz," written by Tom Dawes and Bob Wilvers, courtesy of Miles, Inc.
"The Armour Hot Dog Jingle," courtesy of Armour Swift Eckrich
"Good Things from the Garden," written by Bernie Saber and Robert Noel, courtesy of the Pillsbury Company, produced by Anthony Marinelli, performed by Dan Cortese
"Come Alive (You're in the Pepsi Generation)," written by Sid Ramin, courtesy of Pepsi-Cola Company, produced by Anthony Marinelli
"The Love Boat Theme," written by Charles Fox and Paul Williams
"My Dog's Better Than Your Dog," written by Dick Marx and Tom Paxton, courtesy of The Quaker Oats Company
"Nobody Doesn't Like Sara Lee," written by Fred Ebb and Mitch Leigh, courtesy of Sara Lee Bakery.
+
COMPOSERS
+
DETAILS
Release Date:
8 October 1993
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles opening: 8 October 1993
New York opening: week of 8 October 1993
Copyright Claimant:
Warner Brothers, a division of Time Warner Entertainment Company, LP
Copyright Date:
7 December 1993
Copyright Number:
PA667972
Physical Properties:
Sound
Dolby Stereo in selected theatres
Color
Technicolor®
Lenses/Prints
Lenses and Panaflex® camera by Panavision®
Duration(in mins):
115
MPAA Rating:
R
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
32693
SYNOPSIS

In 1996 Los Angeles, California, a helicopter flies over the war torn city and police officer John Spartan tells the pilots that a bus with thirty passengers has been hijacked by the notorious criminal Simon Phoenix. Connected to a tandem, Spartan leaps from the helicopter onto an abandoned building and dodges a barrage of gunfire. As Spartan fights his way to get inside Phoenix’s hideout, the villain watches from a video monitor and punctures pipes of liquid gas with his knife. When Spartan confronts Phoenix, he discovers he is standing in a pool of gasoline, which Phoenix ignites with a cigarette. Although Spartan drops his gun in the flames, he subdues Phoenix in a fistfight. As he carries the villain out, the fire ignites and levels the building. Walking away from the crime scene, Spartan is berated by his superior for making the arrest without authorization and acting like a “Demolition Man,” but Spartan argues he had nothing to do with the explosion. He insists the hostages were not in the building, but when thirty bodies are found on the site, Spartan is blamed. Phoenix vows to meet up with his adversary in prison. Spartan is sentenced to seventy years in the California “Cryopen” Cryopenitentiary for involuntary manslaughter, where he is frozen and subjected to mental rehabilitation through a behavior modifying technology called “synaptic suggestion.” In 2032, Southern California has been redeveloped as the Utopian society “San Angeles” after a devastating earthquake. Lieutenant Lenina Huxley calls Cyropen warden William Smithers while driving her patrol car through the placid city and complains that her work is uneventful. Meanwhile, outside the ... +


In 1996 Los Angeles, California, a helicopter flies over the war torn city and police officer John Spartan tells the pilots that a bus with thirty passengers has been hijacked by the notorious criminal Simon Phoenix. Connected to a tandem, Spartan leaps from the helicopter onto an abandoned building and dodges a barrage of gunfire. As Spartan fights his way to get inside Phoenix’s hideout, the villain watches from a video monitor and punctures pipes of liquid gas with his knife. When Spartan confronts Phoenix, he discovers he is standing in a pool of gasoline, which Phoenix ignites with a cigarette. Although Spartan drops his gun in the flames, he subdues Phoenix in a fistfight. As he carries the villain out, the fire ignites and levels the building. Walking away from the crime scene, Spartan is berated by his superior for making the arrest without authorization and acting like a “Demolition Man,” but Spartan argues he had nothing to do with the explosion. He insists the hostages were not in the building, but when thirty bodies are found on the site, Spartan is blamed. Phoenix vows to meet up with his adversary in prison. Spartan is sentenced to seventy years in the California “Cryopen” Cryopenitentiary for involuntary manslaughter, where he is frozen and subjected to mental rehabilitation through a behavior modifying technology called “synaptic suggestion.” In 2032, Southern California has been redeveloped as the Utopian society “San Angeles” after a devastating earthquake. Lieutenant Lenina Huxley calls Cyropen warden William Smithers while driving her patrol car through the placid city and complains that her work is uneventful. Meanwhile, outside the San Angeles Police Department, rebels in an underground hideout penetrate the lawn with a device that spray paints “Life is Hell E.F.” on the building’s sign. It is immediately removed. The rebels spy on a food delivery truck with a periscope, plotting a heist so they can redistribute the provisions to hungry citizens. When Huxley arrives at the station, Chief George Earle says he was monitoring her conversation with Smithers and reprimands her for desiring “chaos and disharmony.” After cursing the chief in her office and receiving a citation for swearing, Huxley is visited by her colleague, Alfredo Garcia, who observes her collection of 20th century artifacts and says she is obsessed with the brutality of the past. Meanwhile, at the Cryopen, Phoenix is wheeled into a parole hearing and uses a password to unlock his restraints. With unbridled power, he kills the guards and extracts Smithers’s eyeball, which he uses to bypass the security retinal scanners. Back at the police station, a computer reports the events as Huxley and her fellow officers watch Smithers die on the monitor. When Huxley performs a search of inmates who had parole hearings that morning, Officer Zachary Lamb, the only officer who was on the force in the 1990s, recognizes Phoenix and explains the villain is extraordinarily evil. The computer continues to track Phoenix’s path to the parking garage and reports another murder and a stolen car. Huxley orders the computer to follow the car. Meanwhile, Phoenix accesses a public computer terminal and looks up “E. F.,” Edgar Friendly as a voice in his head commands him to kill the rebel leader. Phoenix tries to find a source of weapons but police officers surround him. Unfamiliar with making arrests, an officer awkwardly follows computerized instructions but the villain subdues the police with superhuman strength. Elsewhere, the leader and architect of San Angeles society, Dr. Raymond Cocteau, warns his council of androids about Friendly and his band of subversive “Scraps.” When Cocteau claims the Scraps have provoked terrorist acts of dissent, Associate Bob interrupts the meeting to report Phoenix’s escape. In a video call to Chief Earle, Cocteau orders him to stop Phoenix by any means necessary. Officer Lamb recalls that Phoenix only had one adversary before he was frozen, Spartan, and Huxley argues the Demolition Man is their best defense. The Chief reluctantly agrees to release him from the cryostatic freeze. As Spartan awakens, Huxley informs him of Phoenix’s escape but Spartan is resentful of his arrest and averse to take on his new mission. After catching up with Lamb, Spartan disparages society’s new austerity and argues with Earle about Phoenix's next move. When Spartan predicts Phoenix is searching for a gun, Earle says they only exist in museums. Meanwhile, at the Hall of Violence, Phoenix breaks into a gun exhibit and gathers a supply of weapons. Arriving at the museum, Spartan reunites with his rival in a protracted gunfight, but Phoenix escapes and runs into Dr. Cocteau, who reveals that he was the voice in Phoenix’s head that ordered him to kill Friendly. Phoenix runs away and the doctor pretends to be grateful to Spartan for saving his life, inviting the detective and Huxley to Taco Bell for dinner. That evening, following Cocteau's direction, Phoenix accesses the underground through a manhole. At the same time, Huxley drives Spartan to their dinner date and explains that Taco Bell is the only restaurant chain left following the franchise wars. The meal is interrupted by Friendly's troops, who fire at the restaurant and attack a food delivery truck. Spartan fights the Scraps and forces them to retreat. However, when Spartan sees they were only after food and hears Cocteau deride the Scraps as a menace to society, he expresses sympathy for their cause. Back at Cocteau’s office, the doctor is surprised by a visit from Phoenix and the villain orders him to defrost other criminals to serve as his henchmen. Meanwhile, at her apartment, Huxley propositions Spartan. Spartan agrees, but he is disconcerted to find that making love in 2032 is a ritual where partners do not have physical contact and are instead stimulated through electronic headgear. Huxley is disgusted by his suggestion that they share bodily fluids, which was prohibited by Cocteau because of its danger to society, but Spartan attempts to break the law with a kiss and she throws him out. The next morning, Spartan apologizes to Huxley and gives her a sweater he knitted himself. Asking her why he has this new skill, Spartan learns that knitting was part of his synaptic rehabilitation and becomes suspicious of Phoenix’s Cryopen training. Huxley checks Phoenix's file and discovers his rehabilitation program enhanced his expertise in violent crimes. When Huxley informs Spartan that the programs were created by Cocteau Industries, he confronts Cocteau in his office and accuses the doctor of masterminding Phoenix's training and escape. Holding Cocteau at gunpoint, Spartan warns that Phoenix will find a way to circumvent his control. Although the doctor orders Huxley to arrest Spartan, she and Officer Garcia follow him into the underground in search of Phoenix. Climbing down through a manhole, the detectives find a bustling, dirty city of multi-ethnic refugees who, contrary to Cocteau’s claims, are not hostile. After a confrontation with Friendly and his men, Spartan recognizes the rebel leader from Taco Bell, and the they share their contempt for Cocteau. When Friendly explains Cocteau is against free speech, independent thought and alternative lifestyles, Spartan informs the leader that Cocteau programmed Phoenix to kill him and stop the rebellion. Meanwhile, Phoenix briefs his henchmen, commanding them to kill Spartan and Friendly. In the ensuing ambush, their attack fails and Phoenix retreats to the surface. He steals Huxley's police car and Spartan and Huxley chase him in a 1970’s muscle car that was preserved underground and elevated to the city streets by a hydraulic lift. As Huxley catches up to Phoenix, Spartan climbs out of the car, leaps to the stolen vehicle and pries the door open. The men struggle and Phoenix reveals that the hostages in the1996 hijacking were dead before the explosion. Spartan throws Phoenix out of the car, but finds it stuck in self-drive and crashes into a fountain in front of the police station. Chief Earle his and men try to arrest Spartan but he ignores them. Friendly and the Scraps come to his aid with Garcia, who has joined their ranks, and they give him weapons. Huxley resigns from the force and joins Spartan. Meanwhile, Cocteau congratulates Phoenix for creating fear and chaos and says he will soon have the power to manifest his ideal society. Annoyed, Phoenix orders one of his henchmen to shoot Cocteau and they throw the doctor’s body into the fireplace. Huxley and Spartan are attacked by Phoenix’s men and Huxley is forced to kill for the first time to save her partner. After finding Cocteau's body, Huxley discovers that Phoenix is attempting to defrost other criminals in the Cryopen. Not wanting Huxley to risk her life, Spartan knocks her out with a stun baton before driving through the Cryopen wall with the muscle car. After a gunfight with Phoenix, the villain traps Spartan in a forklift and uses him for “target practice.” A bullet punctures a coolant hose and Spartan breaks free by freezing the machine. Spartan is knocked to the floor in a fight, but just as Phoenix swings his final blow, the detective smashes a freezing conductor. As Phoenix turns to ice, Spartan jumps back onto the forklift to save himself from the cryofreeze and kicks off Phoenix’s head. The Cryopen explodes as the Demolition Man runs from the wreckage. In the aftermath, Earle asks Spartan how society will go on without Cocteau, and Friendly suggests that anarchy would be in order. Spartan, however, says the two sides will have to compromise and Associate Bob offers to help Friendly lead the new government. When Huxley objects to being left out of their partnership in the final conflict with Phoenix, Spartan pulls her toward him for a passionate kiss and they leave the scene arm in arm. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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