Another Woman (1988)

PG | 81 mins | Drama | 14 October 1988

Director:

Woody Allen

Writer:

Woody Allen

Producer:

Robert Greenhut

Cinematographer:

Sven Nykvist

Editor:

Susan E. Morse

Production Designer:

Santo Loquasto
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HISTORY

Opening credits are preceded by voice-over narration by actress Gena Rowlands in the role of “Marion Post.” The narrative continues throughout the film.
       End credits state the following: “The producers wish to thank the following for their assistance: New York State Governor’s Office for Motion Picture & Television Development; the Mayor’s Office of Film, Theatre & Broadcasting; New York Police Department’s Movie & T.V. Unit; City of New York Parks & Recreation; Palisades Interstate Parks Commission; Albert G. Ruben Insurance Co., Inc.; General Camera Corp.; Lee Lighting America Ltd.; Jay Engel.”
       Referring to the picture by its working title, Woody Allen Fall Project 1987, the 28 Oct 1987 Var announced that principal photography began 13 Oct 1987 in New York City. The 9 Oct 1988 LAT added that the film was also titled Woody ‘88 during production. A 15 Nov 1987 LAT brief, which stated that filming was still underway, noted that the film’s actors were generally unaware of the script and their specific roles when they contracted to work on the project. Filming continued through mid-Dec 1987, as a 13 Dec 1987 LAT news item stated that Allen’s “super-secrecy over script details” was creating confusion on set for actors such as Philip Bosco, who reportedly arrived on location without having read the screenplay, or being informed about his character.
       The 15 Nov 1987 LAT item listed actor Ben Gazzara as among the cast. However, he is not credited onscreen. Similarly, actress Mary Steenburgen was originally cast in the role of “Lynn,” according to the 14 Nov 1988 edition of ... More Less

Opening credits are preceded by voice-over narration by actress Gena Rowlands in the role of “Marion Post.” The narrative continues throughout the film.
       End credits state the following: “The producers wish to thank the following for their assistance: New York State Governor’s Office for Motion Picture & Television Development; the Mayor’s Office of Film, Theatre & Broadcasting; New York Police Department’s Movie & T.V. Unit; City of New York Parks & Recreation; Palisades Interstate Parks Commission; Albert G. Ruben Insurance Co., Inc.; General Camera Corp.; Lee Lighting America Ltd.; Jay Engel.”
       Referring to the picture by its working title, Woody Allen Fall Project 1987, the 28 Oct 1987 Var announced that principal photography began 13 Oct 1987 in New York City. The 9 Oct 1988 LAT added that the film was also titled Woody ‘88 during production. A 15 Nov 1987 LAT brief, which stated that filming was still underway, noted that the film’s actors were generally unaware of the script and their specific roles when they contracted to work on the project. Filming continued through mid-Dec 1987, as a 13 Dec 1987 LAT news item stated that Allen’s “super-secrecy over script details” was creating confusion on set for actors such as Philip Bosco, who reportedly arrived on location without having read the screenplay, or being informed about his character.
       The 15 Nov 1987 LAT item listed actor Ben Gazzara as among the cast. However, he is not credited onscreen. Similarly, actress Mary Steenburgen was originally cast in the role of “Lynn,” according to the 14 Nov 1988 edition of People, but Allen was dissatisfied with her scenes. By the time he was ready for re-shoots, Steenburgen was committed to another film, Miss Firecracker (1989, see entry), and Frances Conroy was hired as a replacement.
       According to studio production notes in AMPAS library files, the production was filmed over a ten-week period at locations including Greenwich Village, the Cherry Lane Theatre and Chumley Bar, located in the West Village, and Central Park.
       Although the film was planned for a 7 Oct 1988 release, the opening date was pushed back a week to 14 Oct 1988. As stated in a 20 Sep 1988 LAHExam news item, the copyright to the title Another Woman was contested by another party, but Allen was granted ownership after an arbitration. Orion Pictures Corporation was forced to briefly eliminate the picture from its fall 1988 schedule. More Less

BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
28 Sep 1988
p. 2.
LAHExam
20 Sep 1988.
---
LAHExam
14 Oct 1988
p. 8.
Los Angeles Times
15 Nov 1987
p. 26.
Los Angeles Times
13 Dec 1987
Calendar, p. K38.
Los Angeles Times
9 Oct 1988
p. K31.
Los Angeles Times
14 Oct 1988
p. 1.
New York Times
14 Oct 1988
p. 3.
New Yorker
31 Oct 1988
pp. 81-82.
People
14 Nov 1988.
---
Variety
28 Oct 1987
p. 3.
Variety
28 Sep 1988
p. 25.
Variety
12 Oct 1988
p. 18.
CAST
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT

PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
A Jack Rollins and Charles H. Joffe Production
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Prod mgr
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
Addl 2d asst dir
DGA trainee
PRODUCERS
Assoc prod
Assoc prod
Exec prod
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Asst cam
2d asst cam
Cam asst trainee
Still photog
Key grip
Dolly grip
Gaffer
Best boy
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des
Art dir
Art dept coord
FILM EDITORS
Negative matching
Assoc film ed
Asst film ed
Apprentice film ed
SET DECORATORS
Set dresser
Prop master
Const coord
Standby carpenter
Chief const grip
Master scenic artist
Standby scenic artist
COSTUMES
Cost des
Asst cost des
Cost asst
Men's ward supv
Women's ward supv
MUSIC
Mus rec eng
SOUND
Prod sd mixer
Boom op
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Sd ed
Asst sd ed
Apprentice sd ed
VISUAL EFFECTS
MAKEUP
Makeup artist
Hairstylist
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
Prod coord
Scr supv
Prod auditor
Asst to Mr. Allen
Projectionist
Loc mgr
Loc scout
Loc scout
Loc scout
Casting assoc
Addl casting
Addl casting
Asst prod coord
Asst prod auditor
Transportation capt
Transportation co-capt
Studio mgr
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
COLOR PERSONNEL
SOURCES
MUSIC
"Gymnopédie No. 3," by Erik Satie, Orchestre de la Société des Concerts du Conservatoire, conducted by Louis Auriacombe, courtesy of EMI-Pathé Marconi, Capitol Records Special Markets
"The Bilbao Song," by Kurt Weill & Bert Brecht, performed by Bernie Leighton
"Unaccompanied Cello Suite In D Major," by Johann Sebastian Bach, performed by Yo-Yo Ma, courtesy of CBS Masterworks/Licensed from CBS Special Products/CBS Records Inc.
+
MUSIC
"Gymnopédie No. 3," by Erik Satie, Orchestre de la Société des Concerts du Conservatoire, conducted by Louis Auriacombe, courtesy of EMI-Pathé Marconi, Capitol Records Special Markets
"The Bilbao Song," by Kurt Weill & Bert Brecht, performed by Bernie Leighton
"Unaccompanied Cello Suite In D Major," by Johann Sebastian Bach, performed by Yo-Yo Ma, courtesy of CBS Masterworks/Licensed from CBS Special Products/CBS Records Inc.
"Ecuatorial," by Edgard Varèse, performed by Ensemble Intercontemporain, conducted by Pierre Boulez, courtesy of CBS Masterworks/Licensed from CBS Special Products/CBS Records Inc.
"Perdido," by Juan Tizol, performed by The Dave Brubeck Quartet, courtesy of Fantasy Records
"You'd Be So Nice To Come Home To," by Cole Porter, performed by Jim Hall, courtesy of CBS Records
"Lovely To Look At," by Jerome Kern, Dorothy Fields & Jimmy McHugh, performed by Bernie Leighton
"A Fine Romance," by Jerome Kern & Dorothy Fields, performed by Erroll Garner, courtesy of Octave Records, Inc./PolyGram Records, Inc., PolyGram Special Projects
"Make Believe," by Oscar Hammerstein II & Jerome Kern, performed by Erroll Garner, courtesy of Octave Records, Inc./PolyGram Records, Inc., PolyGram Special Projects
"Symphony No. 4 in G Major," by Gustav Mahler, performed by The New York Philharmonic, directed by Leonard Bernstein, courtesy of CBS Masterworks/Licensed from CBS Special Products/CBS Records, Inc.
"Smiles," by J. Will Callahan & Lee S. Roberts, performed by Teddy Wilson, courtesy of GNP Crescendo Records
"On The Sunny Side Of The Street," by Jimmy McHugh & Dorothy Fields, performed by Teddy Wilson, courtesy of GNP Crescendo Records
"Sonata For Cello And Piano No. 2 BMV 1028," by Johann Sebastian Bach, performed by Mischa Maisky & Martha Argerich, courtesy of Deutsche Grammophon/PolyGram Classics, PolyGram Special Projects
"Roses Of Picardy," by Fred E. Weatherly & Haydn Wood, performed by Frankie Carle, courtesy of CBS Records
"Sonata For Cello And Piano No. 3 BMV 1029," by Johann Sebastian Bach, performed by Mischa Maisky & Martha Argerich, courtesy of Deutsche Grammophon/PolyGram Classics, PolyGram Special Projects.
+
DETAILS
Alternate Titles:
Woody Allen Fall Project 1987
Woody '88
Release Date:
14 October 1988
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles and New York openings: 14 October 1988
Production Date:
began 13 October 1987 in New York City
Copyright Claimant:
Orion Pictures Corporation
Copyright Date:
27 February 1989
Copyright Number:
PA409512
Physical Properties:
Sound
Color
Lenses
Lenses and Panaflex® Cameras by Panavision®
Prints
Prints by DeLuxe®
Duration(in mins):
81
MPAA Rating:
PG
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
29314
SYNOPSIS

In New York City, fifty-year-old philosophy professor Marion Post lives with her second husband, a cardiologist named Ken, and at times his daughter, Laura. Taking a sabbatical to write a book, Marion sublets a downtown apartment as an office so she can work without distraction. One morning at her office, Marion overhears a sexually revealing therapy session from the neighboring apartment and covers the air vent with pillows to mute the sound. However, she awakens later from a nap by the testimonial of a mournful woman, who believes her life is based on deception and considers suicide. Peeking outside her door, Marion spies a pregnant young woman, composing herself. At a birthday party that evening, Marion’s friends, Mark and Lydia, complain about the thin walls of new buildings and note that their love-making on the floor was interrupted by the superintendent, who mistook their noises as danger. Later at the party, Ken and Marion reminisce about their relationship, but he dismisses her inquiry about making love on their own floor. The next morning Marion hails a cab after waiting for Lynn, her brother Paul’s wife. However, Lynn arrives just in time and asks for money as Paul and her are divorcing. Inquiring why Paul didn’t ask her in person, Marion is surprised to learn that her brother detests her. Later, at her office, Marion removes a pillow from the air vent and eavesdrops on the pregnant young woman, who doubts the sanctity of her marriage and expresses desire for a former lover. Just then, Marion remembers her and Ken’s engagement party. There, Ken’s close friend, Larry Lewis, took Marion aside, ... +


In New York City, fifty-year-old philosophy professor Marion Post lives with her second husband, a cardiologist named Ken, and at times his daughter, Laura. Taking a sabbatical to write a book, Marion sublets a downtown apartment as an office so she can work without distraction. One morning at her office, Marion overhears a sexually revealing therapy session from the neighboring apartment and covers the air vent with pillows to mute the sound. However, she awakens later from a nap by the testimonial of a mournful woman, who believes her life is based on deception and considers suicide. Peeking outside her door, Marion spies a pregnant young woman, composing herself. At a birthday party that evening, Marion’s friends, Mark and Lydia, complain about the thin walls of new buildings and note that their love-making on the floor was interrupted by the superintendent, who mistook their noises as danger. Later at the party, Ken and Marion reminisce about their relationship, but he dismisses her inquiry about making love on their own floor. The next morning Marion hails a cab after waiting for Lynn, her brother Paul’s wife. However, Lynn arrives just in time and asks for money as Paul and her are divorcing. Inquiring why Paul didn’t ask her in person, Marion is surprised to learn that her brother detests her. Later, at her office, Marion removes a pillow from the air vent and eavesdrops on the pregnant young woman, who doubts the sanctity of her marriage and expresses desire for a former lover. Just then, Marion remembers her and Ken’s engagement party. There, Ken’s close friend, Larry Lewis, took Marion aside, kissed her passionately, and cautioned that her decision to marry Ken was based on self-deception, not true love. As partygoers later toast the couple’s future, Ken’s former wife, Kathy, arrived uninvited. As she tearfully returned a box of Ken’s belongings, she declared that she was in the hospital when Ken began his affair with Marion. Back in the present, Marion and her stepdaughter, Laura, drive to the country home of Marion’s father, a widower. The elderly gentleman complains about Paul, and refuses to give his wayward son more money. Looking at photographs, Marion remembers that her father pressured Paul to accept menial work at a paper box factory so Marion could accept her elite college scholarship and leave home. Later that evening, Marion drives back to the city and takes Laura to a club to meet Scott, her boyfriend. Just then, Marion sees the psychiatrist’s pregnant young patient walking down the street and follows on foot to a theater. There, Marion is unexpectedly reunited with a childhood friend named Claire, who is now a famous theatrical actress, and her husband Jack, a theater director. Despite Claire’s reluctance, they go to a bar, where Claire accuses Marion of seducing Jack, as well as a former love interest named David. However, Claire concedes that Marion is oblivious to her own actions. After a sleepless night, Marion realizes her wedding anniversary to Ken is that Friday. Haunted by Claire’s recrimination, she asks Ken if she lured him away from his wife, but he insists he instigated their affair. That day, Marion visits Paul’s office and he tells her that she once castigated his writing. In the evening Marion attends the theater with Ken, Lydia, and Mark, followed by dinner. A woman at the next table interrupts the group and introduces herself as a former student of Marion’s. She states that Marion changed her life and admires her. The next day, Marion fantasizes about walking into the pregnant woman’s session. There, she tells the analyst that the young woman is suffering from self-deception, but she is unwilling to abandon her own myths. Marion then imagines her father entering the office, expressing regret that he loved another woman more than his wife. As Marion’s daydream continues, she finds herself meeting the pregnant woman at a theater rehearsal, where Claire’s husband, Jack, is directing a play based on Marion’s life. Performing the role of “Marion,” Claire argues with Ken about their passionless marriage, and his resistance to making love on the kitchen floor. When Ken claims the character “Marion” uttered the name “Larry” in her sleep, the true Marion envisions a reunion with Larry, who is now married with a daughter. She admits to never reading his book, and Larry reveals that she inspired the character “Helenka.” As Larry leaves, Jack informs Marion to stay for the “finale” of the fantastical play that portrays the suicide of her first husband and former professor, Sam. The man apologizes to Marion for seducing her. Back in the present, Marion returns home and argues with Ken about their sexual abstinence. However, Ken contends the lapse of passion is only fleeting. Sometime later, Marion enters an antique store to shop for Ken’s anniversary present, and finds the pregnant woman crying at the sight of Gustav Klimt’s painting “Hope.” The reproduction is a portrait of a girl with a swollen, gestating belly. Sharing their former aspirations of becoming artists, the two women walk through the city and stop for lunch. At the restaurant, Marion regrets prioritizing her career over being a mother, and reveals that she defied Sam’s wishes to be a father by having an abortion. Back at her office, Marion overhears the pregnant woman report to her psychiatrist that Marion saw her husband, Ken, and their friend, Lydia, sharing a romantic encounter at the restaurant that day. She empathizes with Marion’s experience of self-delusion and loss, but fears becoming like her. Back at Marion’s apartment that evening, she confronts Ken about the affair with Lydia, but he argues it is nothing serious. Marion muses that she should have been aware of his predisposition to infidelity, since their relationship was spawned from adultery. Sometime later, Paul discusses the irony that he and Lynn are restoring their marriage while his sister and Ken are divorcing; the siblings agree to spend more time together. Later, Marion knocks on the door of her psychiatrist neighbor and admits she can hear his patients’ sessions. When he resolves to find a solution, Marion asks for the pregnant woman’s contact information. The psychiatrist reports that the girl ended her treatment and he does not know her whereabouts. In time, Marion successfully progresses with her writing and becomes more insightful about her emotions. Curious about others’ perceptions of her, she remembers Larry’s book, and his portrayal of her as the character “Helenka.” Reading about their first kiss, Marion learns Larry fell in love with her from the start, and that he would never love another woman with such fervor. Despite that moment of passion, Larry realized that Marion was frightened of such strong emotions, and would always try to stifle her true feelings. Back in the present, Marion closes the book and wonders if memories are lost to the past or if they continue to breathe life in her consciousness. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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