Tex Rides with the Boy Scouts (1937)

57 or 66 mins | Western | 29 October 1937

Director:

Ray Taylor

Writer:

Edmond Kelso

Cinematographer:

Gus Peterson

Editor:

Fred Bain

Production Designer:

Vin Taylor

Production Company:

Boots and Saddles Pictures, Inc.
Full page view
HISTORY

According to a HR news item, this film was shot on location in Kernville, CA. The Foreword states that "the glory of upright, stalwart, responsible manhood," is attained only through good boyhood, and explains that the Boy Scouts were started by an Englishman. The film opens with a newsreel of the National Scout Jamboree in Washington, D.C., where boys from across the United States gather at a conference meant "to stimulate becoming a better man." There are twelve noble rules of scout law, and the scout oath reads, "to keep myself physically strong, mentally awake and morally straight." The picture is dedicated "to Boy Scouts of the world...to those worthy lads." Although the Var review remarks that at the film's final fadeout, it was still unclear whether Tex was a government agent or a roving cowboy, the viewed print made it clear that Tex was a G-man, but did not show him revealing his identity to any of the other characters in the ... More Less

According to a HR news item, this film was shot on location in Kernville, CA. The Foreword states that "the glory of upright, stalwart, responsible manhood," is attained only through good boyhood, and explains that the Boy Scouts were started by an Englishman. The film opens with a newsreel of the National Scout Jamboree in Washington, D.C., where boys from across the United States gather at a conference meant "to stimulate becoming a better man." There are twelve noble rules of scout law, and the scout oath reads, "to keep myself physically strong, mentally awake and morally straight." The picture is dedicated "to Boy Scouts of the world...to those worthy lads." Although the Var review remarks that at the film's final fadeout, it was still unclear whether Tex was a government agent or a roving cowboy, the viewed print made it clear that Tex was a G-man, but did not show him revealing his identity to any of the other characters in the film. More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Film Daily
2 Nov 37
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
31 Aug 37
p. 5.
Motion Picture Daily
2 Nov 37
p. 10.
Motion Picture Herald
6 Nov 37
p. 36
Variety
3 Nov 37
p. 15.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
An Edward F. Finney Production
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
PRODUCERS
WRITERS
Story
PHOTOGRAPHY
Photog
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
MUSIC
Mus dir
PRODUCTION MISC
Prod mgr
SOURCES
SONGS
"Girl of the Prairie," music and lyrics by Tex Ritter and Ted Choate
"Headin' for My Texas Home," music and lyrics by Frank Sanucci
"Bad Brahma Bull," music and lyrics by Curley Fletcher.
DETAILS
Release Date:
29 October 1937
Production Date:
began 31 August 1937
Copyright Claimant:
Grand National Films, Inc.
Copyright Date:
1 November 1937
Copyright Number:
LP7591
Physical Properties:
Sound
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
57 or 66
Length(in reels):
7
Country:
United States
PCA No:
3750
SYNOPSIS

In a small town in the West, robbers ambush a train and steal a one-million-dollar gold shipment. Soon G-man Tex Lansing and his friends, Snubby and Pee Wee, ride through town, happen across the Black Hawk Mining and Development Company and are shot off the property, unaware that the train robbers, Stark and Dorman, are hiding there. Tex, Snubby and Pee Wee then come across a Boy Scout camp near the site of the robbery, and meet scouts Buzzy Willis and Tommy Kent. In town, Snubby delivers a shirt to a Chinese laundry that is run by Sing Fung, who is being paid by the thieves to exchange the stolen gold for cash. When Stark comes in to exchange a gold nugget, Snubby sees him and becomes suspicious. Tex meets a young woman named Norma, who works as Dorman's secretary in the Black Hawk office, and introduces himself as a geologist. When Tex visits the Black Hawk base, one of the robbers accosts him, and he is forced to knock him out before escaping on his horse. A gunfight and chase ensue, but Tex eludes the thieves. Later Buzzy introduces Tex to his sister, who turns out to be Norma, and asks her to the barn dance. Tex then writes to Inspector F. B. Colvin of the Treasury Department at the U.S. Mint in Denver, Colorado, telling him that he has made contact with a leading member of the gang. Then, while Stubby buys a small gold nugget from Sing Fung, Dorman and his men pick a fight with Tex and he nearly loses the letter. Later, during the dance, Dorman goes ... +


In a small town in the West, robbers ambush a train and steal a one-million-dollar gold shipment. Soon G-man Tex Lansing and his friends, Snubby and Pee Wee, ride through town, happen across the Black Hawk Mining and Development Company and are shot off the property, unaware that the train robbers, Stark and Dorman, are hiding there. Tex, Snubby and Pee Wee then come across a Boy Scout camp near the site of the robbery, and meet scouts Buzzy Willis and Tommy Kent. In town, Snubby delivers a shirt to a Chinese laundry that is run by Sing Fung, who is being paid by the thieves to exchange the stolen gold for cash. When Stark comes in to exchange a gold nugget, Snubby sees him and becomes suspicious. Tex meets a young woman named Norma, who works as Dorman's secretary in the Black Hawk office, and introduces himself as a geologist. When Tex visits the Black Hawk base, one of the robbers accosts him, and he is forced to knock him out before escaping on his horse. A gunfight and chase ensue, but Tex eludes the thieves. Later Buzzy introduces Tex to his sister, who turns out to be Norma, and asks her to the barn dance. Tex then writes to Inspector F. B. Colvin of the Treasury Department at the U.S. Mint in Denver, Colorado, telling him that he has made contact with a leading member of the gang. Then, while Stubby buys a small gold nugget from Sing Fung, Dorman and his men pick a fight with Tex and he nearly loses the letter. Later, during the dance, Dorman goes to the post office and intercepts the letter. Buzzy then overhears Dorman and his men scheme to leave town immediately to get the gold over the border. Stark, meanwhile, plans to double-cross Dorman and leave town with all the gold. When the men hear Buzzy spying on them, they shoot him in the arm. Norma has left to dance to visit Dorman, however, and finds Buzzy, who mentions the gold to her before passing out. Dorman returns to the mine as Stark and his accomplice, Kemp, are moving the gold, and disarms them and ties them up. Meanwhile, the Boy Scouts go to the mine. As Stark and Kent free themselves from the ropes, the Boy Scouts send warnings with sky rockets, then tie up the robbers. Buzzy revives and Tommy tells Tex that Dorman is escaping on a mule train. After Tex gathers a posse, Dorman's men are forced to abandon the gold to escape. Following a chase and a gunfight, the men surrender, and Tex goes after Dorman alone and arrests him. Buzzy, slowly recovering from his wound, is a hero. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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