Into the Woods (2014)

124 mins | Musical, Fantasy | 25 December 2014

THIS TITLE IS OUTSIDE THE AFI CATALOG OF FEATURE FILMS (1893-1993)
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Director:

Rob Marshall

Writer:

James Lapine

Cinematographer:

Dion Beebe

Editor:

Wyatt Smith

Production Designer:

Dennis Gassner

Production Companies:

Lucamar Productions, Marc Platt Productions
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HISTORY

Composer Stephen Sondheim and writer James Lapine’s long-running, Tony Award-winning musical, Into the Woods, garnered interest for a film adaptation not long after its 5 Nov 1987 Broadway opening at New York City’s Martin Beck Theatre. According to a 10 Dec 2014 HR article, the production and its revivals had grossed over $200 million since its inception, not including smaller performances at community theaters and schools. The licensing company, Music Theater International, approximated that almost 600,000 individuals have been credited for their work on Into the Woods over twenty-seven years.
       In the early 1990s, film rights were optioned by Columbia Pictures and the Jim Henson Company with the intention of combining live action with puppets, as stated in the 10 Dec 2014 HR. At the time, a table reading included actors Robin Williams as the “Baker,” Goldie Hawn as the “Baker’s wife,” and Cher as the “Witch.” A 12 Dec 2014 LAT article noted that the reading took place at Penny Marshall’s home, implying she was a potential producer-director, and added Steve Martin as the “Wolf,” Danny DeVito as the “Giant,” and Roseanne Barr as “Jack’s mother.” The actors read an early version of the adaptation by Babaloo Mandell and Lowell Ganz. As noted in Sondheim’s book, Look, I Made a Hat (New York, 2011), the project was set for production until “a new platoon of executives” took over, and the fresh administrators were eager “to throw out all projects begun before their arrival.”
       The motion picture adaptation of Into the Woods remained in limbo for over ... More Less

Composer Stephen Sondheim and writer James Lapine’s long-running, Tony Award-winning musical, Into the Woods, garnered interest for a film adaptation not long after its 5 Nov 1987 Broadway opening at New York City’s Martin Beck Theatre. According to a 10 Dec 2014 HR article, the production and its revivals had grossed over $200 million since its inception, not including smaller performances at community theaters and schools. The licensing company, Music Theater International, approximated that almost 600,000 individuals have been credited for their work on Into the Woods over twenty-seven years.
       In the early 1990s, film rights were optioned by Columbia Pictures and the Jim Henson Company with the intention of combining live action with puppets, as stated in the 10 Dec 2014 HR. At the time, a table reading included actors Robin Williams as the “Baker,” Goldie Hawn as the “Baker’s wife,” and Cher as the “Witch.” A 12 Dec 2014 LAT article noted that the reading took place at Penny Marshall’s home, implying she was a potential producer-director, and added Steve Martin as the “Wolf,” Danny DeVito as the “Giant,” and Roseanne Barr as “Jack’s mother.” The actors read an early version of the adaptation by Babaloo Mandell and Lowell Ganz. As noted in Sondheim’s book, Look, I Made a Hat (New York, 2011), the project was set for production until “a new platoon of executives” took over, and the fresh administrators were eager “to throw out all projects begun before their arrival.”
       The motion picture adaptation of Into the Woods remained in limbo for over ten years until the success of musical films including Baz Lurhrmann’s Moulin Rouge! (2001, see entry) and director Rob Marshall’s Chicago (2003, see entry), which grossed $300 million internationally and won six Academy Awards, including Best Picture. Proving there was renewed commercial interest in motion picture musicals, Marshall met with Sondheim to discuss projects such as Follies (New York, 4 Apr 1971) or Sweeney Todd (New York, 1 Mar 1979). Sondheim was reportedly eager for Marshall to make a screen version of Into the Woods, but over the next decade, Marshall was preoccupied with productions including Memoirs of a Geisha (2005, see entry) and Nine (2009, see entry), neither of which were a financial success. However, Marshall regained blockbuster status with the Walt Disney Studios Motion Pictures’ Pirates of the Carribbean: On Stranger Tides (2011, see entry), which grossed over $1 billion worldwide.
       According to production notes in AMPAS library files, Marshall returned to Into the Woods after his newfound success. He was convinced the property was relevant when President Barack Obama told victims’ families at a commemoration of the “9/11” terrorist attacks that they were “…not alone … no one is alone.” The phrase reminded the director of the Into the Woods song, “No One Is Alone,” and he decided to make the production a priority. Underlying the importance of the song, Sondheim noted that it showcased the entire meaning of Into the Woods —that individuals are all connected in their separate lives and therefore responsible for each others’ actions.
       On 12 Jan 2012, a NYT news item announced that Rob Marshall planned to make Into the Woods his first venture in a new production deal with Disney. One day earlier, on 11 Jan 2012, Marshall’s company, Lucamar Productions, signed a “two-year first-look contract” with Disney, and Lapine was already working on the screen adaptation of his book. At the time, there were no casting announcements, and the studio had not set a production schedule or specific release date.
       Although a 4 Nov 2014 Var article stated that Disney backed the project from the start with a $50 million budget, the 10 Dec 2014 HR claimed that the studio was reticent about taking on the darker side of Brothers Grimm fairy tales. Disney’s president of production, Sean Bailey, told HR that executives were concerned with the perverted, pedophilic quality of the Wolf and the scene in which the Baker’s wife has an affair with “Cinderella’s prince.” In Oct 2012, Marshall arranged a three-day reading in New York City to allay the studio’s anxiety. There, a “workshop cast” including Anna Kendrick, James Corden, and Christine Baranski performed the script and sang the score, convincing Disney that the project had vitality and blockbuster potential. Bailey noted that Disney was ready to reinterpret fairy tales in “a relevant way for our time.”
       By 31 May 2013, Chris Pine, Johnny Depp, and Meryl Streep had all been cast, as stated in an HR article published that day. The $50 million budget was notably low for Disney, which spent approximately $200 million on both Oz the Great and Powerful (2013, see entry) and Maleficent (2014, see entry). The film’s 17 Dec 2014 Var review also added that the 1990s version had planned a budget that far exceeded $50 million. Cast and crew all took pay cuts, including Streep, who earned $1.5 million, and Depp, who had a salary under $1 million. At the time, Emily Blunt was still negotiating her contract to perform the role of the Baker’s wife and Jake Gyllenhaal was “in talks” to portray Cinderella’s prince. He did not remain with the project. Similarly, ten-year-old YouTube sensation Sophia Grace was initially cast as “Little Red Riding Hood,” but after rehearsals, Marshall decided she was too young for the role and hired Lilla Crawford after an Internet audition on Skype. The production was scheduled to begin in fall 2013. On 5 Jun 2013, Anna Kendrick’s casting was confirmed by HR, and a 14 Jun 2013 HR article announced a Christmas 2014 release date, positioning the film against Sony Pictures’ remake of Annie (2014, see entry). By the end of the month, a 28 Jun 2013 HR news item reported that Tracey Ullman was still negotiating her role as “Jack’s mother.”
       During this time, Stephen Sondheim attended a “speaking engagement” and revealed that the Disney production was being revised to be more “family-friendly,” according to an 18 Jun 2014 Var article. Although the film did not adhere to traditional “happy ending” fairy tale themes, the Lapine adaptation cut more controversial scenes from the stage play, including the death of “Rapunzel,” the scene in which the Baker’s wife and Cinderella’s prince make love, and the sexually charged interaction between Little Red Riding Hood and Johnny Depp’s Wolf. Sondheim predicted the songs “Any Moment,” “Lament,” and “Moments In The Woods” would be cut, but they remained in the picture.
       Principal photography took place in England over a three-month period starting in Sep 2013 after six weeks of rehearsals, according to the 4 Nov 2014 Var. As stated in production notes, filming began in the “ancient forest” of Ashridge Estate near Berkhamsted. There, young actor Daniel Huttlestone, as “Jack,” performed “Giants In The Sky” on the first day of the shoot. The Baker’s village was located near Henley on Thames in Hamblenden Village, and a neighboring barn was dressed to portray the farmhouse of Jack and his mother. Many of the “Woods” scenes were filmed at Windsor Great Park at the border of Surrey and Berkshire, which featured oak trees over 800 years old. Inside the park, a section called “Bear Rails” was used for the house of Little Red Riding Hood’s “Granny.” Production designer Dennis Gassner drew his inspiration for Granny’s tree from South Carolina’s ancient and distinctive “Angel Oak,” and sought to replicate it in England. Another area in Windsor Great Park, “Cascades Waterfall,” was the setting for the princes’ duet, “Agony.” “Rapunzel’s” tower was constructed within the ruins of Waverly Abbey, an 18th-century home in Farnham, Surrey. Exteriors for “Cinderella’s” home were shot at Byfleet Manor in Byfleet, Surrey, and the location of her wedding was filmed at Dover Castle.
       Although much of the picture was shot on soundstages, Marshall avoided the use of green screens and opted for “practical sets,” where actors could visualize the surroundings of their scenes. The Woods sets were all built on Shepperton Studios’ Stage H in Surrey, where seventy percent of filming took place. Costume designer Colleen Atwood also used the Woods as inspiration for the look of the characters, with the Witch’s costume replicating tree bark. Johnny Depp first came up with the idea for his costume when he was asked to join the cast, claiming, “All I could think of was the wolf in the zoot suit in the Tex Avery cartoons.” Emily Blunt added that Atwood’s designs were effective in hiding her real-life pregnancy during the shoot, and reflected upon the irony that her character, the Baker’s wife, was motivated in the story by her inability to conceive a child. Tasked with giving Rapunzel a twenty-foot-long braid, make-up and hair designer Peter Swords King imported nearly six pounds of authentic blonde hair from Germany which was woven with cotton and braided into the hair of actress MacKenzie Mauzy.
       All songs were pre-recorded, then matched by actors singing on set, with the exception of actress Meryl Streep’s “Witches Lament” and the Baker’s wife and Cinderella’s duet, “A Very Nice Prince.” According to an 8 Dec 2014 Var interview with Anna Kendrick, both songs were filmed live. Music producer and supervisor Mike Higham told the 4 Nov 2014 Var that Marshall previously blocked each scene on a soundstage before filming. In Aug 2013, music supervisor Paul Gemignani, who worked with Sondheim on other projects, including the original stage production of Into the Woods, conducted a fifty-three piece orchestra at London, England’s Angel Studio, where each actor recorded their songs individually over a two-week period. Production notes stated that the orchestra included fifty-six members, with many musicians from the London Philharmonic and the London Symphony Orchestra. By summer 2014, Julian Kershaw added forty minutes of underscore in post-production, conducting a seventy-two piece orchestra. While a 27 Sep 2013 HR news item announced that Sondheim was writing a new song for the production, the Witch’s tune, “She’ll Be Back,” it was cut from the picture after a preview screening, according to the 4 Nov 2014 Var. However, the filmmakers intended to include it on the 2015 DVD release.
       During post-production, Disney began to doubt the project yet again, according to the 10 Dec 2014 HR. Another Disney film, Kenneth Branagh’s Cinderella, finished production at the same time as Into the Woods, so Cinderella was pushed back to a 13 Mar 2015 release date to avoid two similar competing Disney projects. In addition, The New Yorker published an interview with Sondheim, who reportedly did not like the changes Disney made to “soften” his original musical, in particular the failure to portray the Baker’s wife’s affair with Cinderella’s Prince. The article also said that Sondheim was displeased that the interlude’s song, “Any Moment,” was cut. Marshall contended that Sondheim was misquoted in the article – there is a romantic moment between the two characters, and the song is in the picture – but his reactions provoked negative press and outrage from Sondheim fans, who accused Disney of “whitewashing” the musical. Sondheim, himself, felt misrepresented and denied the New Yorker quotes. In a 12 Dec 2014 LAT interview, Sondheim claimed that his problem with Disney’s adaptation was not the softened love scene between the Baker’s wife and Cinderella’s prince, which was alluded to with a kiss, but the exemption of Rapunzel’s death.
       Into the Woods was named one of AFI’s Movies of the Year and was nominated for three Golden Globe Awards in the following categories: Best Actress in a Motion Picture, Musical or Comedy (Emily Blunt), Best Supporting Actress in a Motion Picture (Meryl Streep), and Best Motion Picture, Musical or Comedy. It was also nominated for three Academy Awards: Actress in a Supporting Role (Streep), Production Design (Dennis Gassner and Anna Pinnock), and Costume Design (Colleen Atwood). More Less

BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Hollywood Reporter
31 May 2013.
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Hollywood Reporter
5 Jun 2013.
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Hollywood Reporter
14 Jun 2013.
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Hollywood Reporter
28 Jun 2013.
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Hollywood Reporter
27 Sep 2013.
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Hollywood Reporter
10 Dec 2014.
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Los Angeles Times
12 Dec 2014.
---
Los Angeles Times
24 Dec 2014.
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New York Times
12 Jan 2012.
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New York Times
22 Dec 2014.
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Variety
18 Jun 2014.
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Variety
4 Nov 2014.
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Variety
8 Dec 2014.
---
Variety
17 Dec 2014.
---
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
A Lucamar/Marc Platt Production
A Rob Marshall Film
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
1st asst dir
Unit prod mgr
Unit prod mgr
2d asst dir
2d unit dir
2d unit dir
2d 2d asst dir
3d asst dir
1st asst dir, 2d unit
2d asst dir, 2d unit
Prod mgr, Miniatures unit
PRODUCERS
Prod
Prod, Original Broadway production produced by
Prod, Original Broadway production produced by
Prod, Original Broadway production produced by
Prod, Original Broadway production produced by
Prod, Original Broadway production produced by
Originally produced by
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
'A' camera/Steadicam op
'B' cam op
Key grip
'A' cam 1st asst cam
'B' cam 1st asst cam
'A' cam 2d asst cam
'B' cam 2d asst cam
Cam trainee
Cam trainee
Digital imaging tech
Video playback op
Video asst asst
Video playback trainee
Dailies colourist
Dailies prod
Dailies data mgr
Dailies data asst
Digital dailies systems
Best boy
Best boy
Lighting desk op
Elec
Standby elec rigger
Rigging gaffer
Chargehand rigging elec
Rigging desk op
Rigging elec
Rigging elec
Rigging elec
Rigging elec
Rigging elec
Rigging elec
Rigging elec
HOD elec rigger
Chargehand elec rigger
Elec rigger
Rigging elec
Elec rigger
Elec rigger
Best boy grip
'A' cam grip
'B' cam grip
Head tech
Crane tech
Standby rigger
Stunt rigger
HOD rigger
Still photog
DOP/cam op, 2d unit
1st asst cam, 2d unit
2d asst cam, 2d unit
Video playback op, 2d unit
Video asst asst, 2d unit
Dir of photog, Miniatures unit
Cameras provided by
Lighting services supplied by
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des
Supervising art dir
Art dir
Art dir
Art dir
Storyboard artist
Standby art dir
Asst art dir
Conceptual artist
Graphic des
Art dept asst
FILM EDITORS
1st asst ed
2d asst ed
2d asst ed
Asst ed
Post prod coord
Ed trainee
Colorist
Conform ed
DI prod
DI eng
DI eng
Digital imaging tech, 2d unit
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Const mgr
Property master
Draughtsman
Model maker
Junior draughtsman
Asst set dec
Standby carpenter
Standby painter
Standby stagehand
Asst prop master
Property storeman
Chargehand dressing propman
Chargehand dressing propman
Chargehand standby propman
Standby propman
Dressing propman
Dressing propman
Dressing propman
Drapesmaster
Asst const mgr
Const coord
Supervising carpenter
Chargehand carpenter
Chargehand carpenter
Chargehand carpenter
HOD plasterer
Supervising plasterer
Supervising plasterer
HOD painter
Const elec
Scenic artist
Sculptor
Greens supv
Greens supv
Standby supv greensman
Greensman
Greensman
Greensman
Greensman
Greensman
Standby propman, 2d unit
Standby propman, 2d unit
COSTUMES
Cost des
Cost supv
Asst cost des
Cost buyer
Principal cost standby
Principal cost standby
Principal cost standby
Principal cost standby
Principal cost standby
Principal cost standby
Crowd costumer
Crowd costumer
Crowd costumer
Cost cutter
Cost cutter
Cost cutter
Cost maker
Cost maker
Cost maker
Cost maker
Cost maker
Cost maker
Cost maker
Cost maker
Cost maker
Cost maker
Cost maker
Cost maker
Cost maker
Cost textile artist
Cost textile artist
Cost textile artist
Cost dept coord
Cost trainee
Cost trainee
Cost trainee
MUSIC
Mus and lyrics by
Musical staging by
Musical staging by
Mus prod
Mus supv
Mus supv
Mus score adaptation by
Mus conducted by
Orchestrations by
Mus staging assoc
Mus consultant
Supervising mus ed
Addl orchestrations and addl conducting by
Addl arrangements by
Addl arrangements by
Mus recorded and mixed by
Asst mus ed
Orch contractor
Asst orch contractor
Solo flute
Choir
Mus librarian
Mus preparation
Rehearsal pianist
Mus recorded at
Mus rec at Air Studios
Asst eng at British Grover Studios
Mus mixed at
Asst eng at MSR Studios
SOUND
Supervising sd ed
Supervising sd ed
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Prod sd mixer
Playback op
Boom op
Sd maintenance
Sd maintenance
Sd trainee
Sd tech for Mr. Depp
Supervising asst sd ed
Sd eff ed
Sd eff ed
Dial ed
Dial ed
Dial ed
Foley supv
Foley mixer
Sd eff rec
Sd eff rec
Background voice casting
Background voice casting
Background voice casting
Background voice
Background voice
Background voice
Background voice
Background voice
Background voice
Background voice
Background voice
Background voice
Background voice
Background voice
Background voice
Background voice
Background voice
Background voice
Background voice
Background voice
ADR mixer
ADR mixer
ADR mixer
ADR mixer
ADR mixer
ADR rec
ADR rec
ADR rec
ADR rec
ADR facility
ADR facility
ADR facility
Foley rec at
Spec eff tech
Asst eng at Angel Studios
Sd mixer, 2d unit
VISUAL EFFECTS
Visual eff supv
Visual eff prod
Spec eff supv
Visual eff ed
Spec eff workshop supv
Spec eff floor supv
Spec eff coord/ buyer
Senior spec eff tech
Senior spec eff tech
Senior spec eff tech
Spec eff tech
Spec eff tech
Spec eff modeler
Asst spec eff tech
Asst spec eff tech
Asst spec eff tech
Spec eff workshop trainee
Spec eff workshop trainee
Spec eff workshop trainee
Main on end title seq des by
Miniatures by, Miniatures unit
Minatures supv, Minatures unit
Visual eff coord, Visual eff
Visual eff coord, Visual eff
Visual eff asst coord, Visual eff
Visual eff PA, Visual eff
Visual eff PA, Visual eff
In-house compositing artist, Visual eff
Visual eff by, Visual eff
Visual eff supv, Visual eff
Visual eff prod, Visual eff
CG supv, Visual eff
Compositing supv, Visual eff
Anim supv, Visual eff
Visual eff prod mgr, Visual eff
Visual eff prod, Visual eff
Visual eff prod, Visual eff
Visual eff prod, Visual eff
Visual eff prod, Visual eff
Visual eff prod, Visual eff
Visual eff prod, Visual eff
Visual eff prod, Visual eff
Visual eff prod, Visual eff
Visual eff prod, Visual eff
Visual eff prod, Visual eff
Visual eff prod, Visual eff
Visual eff prod, Visual eff
Visual eff prod, Visual eff
Visual eff prod, Visual eff
Visual eff prod, Visual eff
Visual eff prod, Visual eff
Visual eff prod, Visual eff
Visual eff prod, Visual eff
Visual eff prod, Visual eff
Visual eff prod, Visual eff
Visual eff prod, Visual eff
Visual eff prod, Visual eff
Visual eff prod, Visual eff
Visual eff prod, Visual eff
Visual eff prod, Visual eff
Lead digital artist, Visual eff
Lead digital artist, Visual eff
Lead digital artist, Visual eff
Lead digital artist, Visual eff
Lead digital artist, Visual eff
Lead digital artist, Visual eff
Lead digital artist, Visual eff
Lead digital artist, Visual eff
Lead digital artist, Visual eff
Lead digital artist, Visual eff
Lead digital artist, Visual eff
Lead digital artist, Visual eff
Lead digital artist, Visual eff
Lead digital artist, Visual eff
Lead digital artist, Visual eff
Lead digital artist, Visual eff
Lead digital artist, Visual eff
Lead digital artist, Visual eff
Lead digital artist, Visual eff
Lead digital artist, Visual eff
Lead digital artist, Visual eff
Lead digital artist, Visual eff
Lead digital artist, Visual eff
Digital artist, Visual eff
Digital artist, Visual eff
Digital artist, Visual eff
Digital artist, Visual eff
Digital artist, Visual eff
Digital artist, Visual eff
Digital artist, Visual eff
Digital artist, Visual eff
Digital artist, Visual eff
Digital artist, Visual eff
Digital artist, Visual eff
Digital artist, Visual eff
Digital artist, Visual eff
Digital artist, Visual eff
Digital artist, Visual eff
Digital artist, Visual eff
Digital artist, Visual eff
Digital artist, Visual eff
Digital artist, Visual eff
Digital artist, Visual eff
Digital artist, Visual eff
Digital artist, Visual eff
Digital artist, Visual eff
Digital artist, Visual eff
Digital artist, Visual eff
Digital artist, Visual eff
Digital artist, Visual eff
Digital artist, Visual eff
Digital artist, Visual eff
Digital artist, Visual eff
Digital artist, Visual eff
Digital artist, Visual eff
Digital artist, Visual eff
Digital artist, Visual eff
Digital artist, Visual eff
Digital artist, Visual eff
Digital artist, Visual eff
Digital artist, Visual eff
Digital artist, Visual eff
Digital artist, Visual eff
Digital artist, Visual eff
Digital artist, Visual eff
Digital artist, Visual eff
Digital artist, Visual eff
Digital artist, Visual eff
Digital artist, Visual eff
Digital artist, Visual eff
Digital artist, Visual eff
Digital artist, Visual eff
Digital artist, Visual eff
Digital artist, Visual eff
Digital artist, Visual eff
Digital artist, Visual eff
Digital artist, Visual eff
Digital artist, Visual eff
Digital artist, Visual eff
Digital artist, Visual eff
Digital artist, Visual eff
Digital artist, Visual eff
Digital artist, Visual eff
Digital artist, Visual eff
Digital artist, Visual eff
Digital artist, Visual eff
Digital artist, Visual eff
Digital artist, Visual eff
Digital artist, Visual eff
Digital artist, Visual eff
Digital artist, Visual eff
Digital artist, Visual eff
Digital artist, Visual eff
Digital artist, Visual eff
Digital artist, Visual eff
Digital artist, Visual eff
Digital artist, Visual eff
Digital artist, Visual eff
Digital artist, Visual eff
Digital artist, Visual eff
Digital artist, Visual eff
Digital artist, Visual eff
Digital artist, Visual eff
Digital artist, Visual eff
Digital artist, Visual eff
Digital artist, Visual eff
Digital artist, Visual eff
Digital artist, Visual eff
Digital artist, Visual eff
Digital artist, Visual eff
Digital artist, Visual eff
Digital artist, Visual eff
Digital artist, Visual eff
Digital artist, Visual eff
Digital artist, Visual eff
Digital artist, Visual eff
Ed, Editorial
Addl visual eff, Editorial
Addl visual eff, Editorial
Addl visual eff, Editorial
Previsualization, Editorial
Creature eff by, Editorial
Creature eff des, Editorial
Creature eff asst, Editorial
MAKEUP
Make-up and hair designed by
Witch's hair and make-up by
Personal make-up artists and prosthetic design art
Prosthetic make-up des - Meryl Streep
Make-up and hair artist
Make-up and hair artist
Make-up and hair artist
Make-up and hair artist
Make-up and hair junior
Make-up crowd coord
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
Post prod supv
Stunt performer
Stunt performer
Prod supv
Scr supv
Financial controller
Supervising loc mgr
Exec asst to Mr. Marshall & Mr. DeLuca
Exec asst to Mr. Platt
Prod buyer
Data management tech
Asst scr supv
Loc mgr
Asst loc mgr
Asst loc mgr
Loc unit mgr
Studio unit mgr
Key loc asst
Loc asst
Loc asst
Loc asst
Environmental steward
Environmental steward
UK sales contact
Prod coord
Asst prod coord
Asst prod coord
Prod secy
Prod secy
Prod asst
Prod asst
Crowd 2d asst dir
Set PA
Set PA
Set PA
Asst to Mr. Platt
Asst to Mr. McDougall
PA to Mr. Marshall & Mr. DeLuca
Asst to Ms. Streep
Asst to Ms. Streep
Asst to Mr. Depp
Asst to Mr. Depp
Asst to cast
Cast tutor
Vocal coach to Mr. Depp
Addl voice coach
Orch leader
HOD stagehand
Supervising stagehand
Prod accountant
US payroll accountant
Payroll accountant
Post prod accountant
Post prod accountant
Asst accountant
Asst accountant
Asst accountant
Asst accountant
Account asst
Transportation capt
Driver for Mr. Marshall & Mr. DeLuca
Driver for Mr. Platt
Driver for Ms. Steep
Unit driver
Unit driver
Unit driver
Unit driver
Unit driver
Unit driver
Unit driver
Unit driver
Unit driver
Unit driver
Unit driver
Unit driver
Unit driver
Unit driver
Unit driver
HOD tech trucks
HOD facilities
HOD 4x4's
HOD mini bus driver
Casting consultant (UK)
Casting consultant (UK)
Casting asst
Casting asst
Animal supv
Cow trainer
Animal trainer
Horsemaster
Catering
Unit nurse
Health and safety officer
Fire safety officer
Digital intermediate services provided by
Data mgr
Data management tech, 2d unit
Gaffer, 2d unit
Scr supv, 2d unit
Set PA, 2d unit
Set PA, 2d unit
STAND INS
Stunt coord
Stunt performer
Stunt performer
Stunt performer
Stunt performer
Stunt performer
Stunt performer
Stunt performer
Stunt performer
Stunt performer
Stunt performer
Stunt performer
Stunt performer
Stunt performer
Stunt performer
Stunt performer
Stunt performer
Stunt performer
Stunt performer
Stunt performer
Stunt performer
Picture double
Picture double
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based of the musical Into the Woods, music and lyrics by Stephen Sondheim, book by James Lapine, originally produced on the stage by The Martin Beck Theatre (New York, 5 Nov 1987), which was based on the traditional stories "Little Red Riding Hood," "Jack and the Beanstalk," "Rapunzel," and "Cinderella," adapted by the Brothers Grimm.
SONGS
“Prologue: Into the Woods,” music and lyrics by Stephen Sondheim, performed by Company
“Cinderella At The Grave,” music and lyrics by Stephen Sondheim, performed by Joanna Riding
“Hello, Little Girl,” music and lyrics by Stephen Sondheim, performed by Johnny Depp and Lilla Crawford
+
SONGS
“Prologue: Into the Woods,” music and lyrics by Stephen Sondheim, performed by Company
“Cinderella At The Grave,” music and lyrics by Stephen Sondheim, performed by Joanna Riding
“Hello, Little Girl,” music and lyrics by Stephen Sondheim, performed by Johnny Depp and Lilla Crawford
“Rapunzel’s Song,” music and lyrics by Stephen Sondheim, performed by Mackenzie Mauzy
“The Cow As White As Milk,” music and lyrics by Stephen Sondheim, performed by James Corden and Emily Blunt
“I Know Things Now,” music and lyrics by Stephen Sondheim, performed by Lilla Crawford
“Night Waltz" (Instrumental),” music by Stephen Sondheim, courtesy of Sony Masterworks by arrangement with Sony Music Licensing
“A Very Nice Prince,” music and lyrics by Stephen Sondheim, performed by Anna Kendrick and Emily Blunt
“Giants In The Sky,” music and lyrics by Stephen Sondheim, performed by Daniel Huttlestone
“Agony,” music and lyrics by Stephen Sondheim, performed by Chris Pine and Billy Magnussen
“It Takes Two,” music and lyrics by Stephen Sondheim, performed by Emily Blunt and James Corden
“Stay With Me,” music and lyrics by Stephen Sondheim, performed by Meryl Streep
“On The Steps Of The Palace,” music and lyrics by Stephen Sondheim, performed by Anna Kendrick
“Careful My Toe,” music and lyrics by Stephen Sondheim, performed by Christine Baranski, Tammy Blanchard, Lucy Punch
“You Must Meet My Wife," (Harp Instrumental), music by Stephen Sondheim
“Ever After (Instrumental)," music by Stephen Sondheim
“Witch’s Lament,” music and lyrics by Stephen Sondheim, performed by Meryl Streep
“Any Moment,” music and lyrics by Stephen Sondheim, performed by Chris Pine and Emily Blunt
“Moments In The Woods,” music and lyrics by Stephen Sondheim, performed by Emily Blunt
“Your Fault,” music and lyrics by Stephen Sondheim, performed by Daniel Huttlestone, James Corden, Lilla Crawford, Meryl Streep, Anna Kendrick
“Last Midnight,” music and lyrics by Stephen Sondheim, performed by Meryl Streep
“No More (Instrumental)," music by Stephen Sondheim
“No One Is Alone,” music and lyrics by Stephen Sondheim, performed by Anna Kendrick, James Corden, Lilla Crawford, Daniel Huttlestone
“Finale/Children Will Listen,” music and lyrics by Stephen Sondheim, performed by James Corden, Emily Blunt, Meryl Streep and Company
“Into The Woods (Reprise)," music and lyrics by Stephen Sondheim, performed by Company
“Stay With Me (Instrumental),” music by Stephen Sondheim
“Last Midnight (Instrumental),” music by Stephen Sondheim.
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COMPOSER
DETAILS
Release Date:
25 December 2014
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles and New York openings: 25 December 2014
Production Date:
September--December 2013
Physical Properties:
Sound
Dolby® Digital in selected theatres
Color
Prints
Prints by Fotokem
Duration(in mins):
124
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
49342
SYNOPSIS

In an ancient village near a forest, townspeople wish for better lives. Among them are orphaned Cinderella, who is exploited by her vulgar stepmother; a baker and his wife who long for a child; young Jack and his mother, whose only cow, “Milky-White,” is barren of milk; and a girl named “Little Red Riding Hood.” While cleaning her stepmother’s kitchen, Cinderella learns of a three-day royal festival and dreams of meeting the bachelor prince, but her hopes are crushed by Cinderella’s stepmother and her two wicked daughters. Meanwhile, Jack’s mother sends the boy into the woods to sell “Milky-White,” but he protests the cow is his best friend. At the town bake shop, Little Red Riding Hood convinces the baker and his wife to donate food for her sickly grandmother, but eats it herself. As she skips into the woods, the baker and his wife receive an unexpected visit from a witch. The old lady claims she can help the couple conceive if they comply with her demands. In three days, a “blue moon” lunar eclipse can remove the curse she once cast on their home: When the baker’s mother was pregnant with her second child, she craved green vegetables and forced her husband to steal from the witch’s garden. At that time, the witch was a beautiful young woman and agreed to share her food in return for the forthcoming baby, a promise the couple did not intend to keep. When the baker’s father foraged the witch’s magic beans, however, she lost her youth and beauty. Furious, the witch took the baby girl and cast a spell over ... +


In an ancient village near a forest, townspeople wish for better lives. Among them are orphaned Cinderella, who is exploited by her vulgar stepmother; a baker and his wife who long for a child; young Jack and his mother, whose only cow, “Milky-White,” is barren of milk; and a girl named “Little Red Riding Hood.” While cleaning her stepmother’s kitchen, Cinderella learns of a three-day royal festival and dreams of meeting the bachelor prince, but her hopes are crushed by Cinderella’s stepmother and her two wicked daughters. Meanwhile, Jack’s mother sends the boy into the woods to sell “Milky-White,” but he protests the cow is his best friend. At the town bake shop, Little Red Riding Hood convinces the baker and his wife to donate food for her sickly grandmother, but eats it herself. As she skips into the woods, the baker and his wife receive an unexpected visit from a witch. The old lady claims she can help the couple conceive if they comply with her demands. In three days, a “blue moon” lunar eclipse can remove the curse she once cast on their home: When the baker’s mother was pregnant with her second child, she craved green vegetables and forced her husband to steal from the witch’s garden. At that time, the witch was a beautiful young woman and agreed to share her food in return for the forthcoming baby, a promise the couple did not intend to keep. When the baker’s father foraged the witch’s magic beans, however, she lost her youth and beauty. Furious, the witch took the baby girl and cast a spell over the home, condemning its future inhabitants to remain childless. She reminds the baker that his mother died of a broken heart and his father left him an orphan. With the blue moon rising, the witch agrees to lift the spell if the baker goes into the woods and procures “a cow as white as milk, a cape as red as blood, hair as yellow as corn, and a slipper as pure as gold”: the ingredients for a rejuvenating elixir. The witch disappears and the baker’s wife finds an old jacket that belonged to the baker’s father. Six magic beans drop from the pocket to the floor. Although she wants to join her husband in his quest, the baker orders his wife to stay behind. She gives her husband a scarf for warmth. Unaware of each other, Jack and “Milky-White,” Little Red Riding Hood, the baker, and Cinderella all head into the woods. Cinderella sees an apparition at her mother’s gravesite and is magically adorned in a golden gown for the ball. Little Red Riding Hood is followed by a hungry wolf, intent on consuming her. The baker snatches Red Riding Hood’s cape, but he returns the garment when she screams. As the baker loses faith, he is cheered by the unexpected arrival of his wife. The couple sees Jack and convinces him to sell the cow for five “magic” beans, keeping one bean for themselves. They deceitfully promise to sell the cow back if the boy earns five gold coins, and the baker sends his wife home with the animal. Meanwhile, a beautiful voice resounds through the forest and a prince notices a girl singing in a door-less tower. Rapunzel, the baker’s kidnapped sibling, lowers her long, braided corn-colored hair from the tower’s single window and the witch uses it as a rope to climb up. Once inside, the witch lovingly refers to Rapunzel as her daughter. Elsewhere, Little Red Riding Hood approaches her grandmother’s oak-tree home and is devoured by the wolf. However, the baker cuts the wolf and the girl and her grandmother magically reappear. In return for the favor, Little Red Riding Hood gives the baker her cloak. That night, Cinderella dances with the prince and captivates his heart, but remains disillusioned by his vanity and runs back into the woods. Cinderella comes upon the baker’s wife and begs her to mislead the pursuing prince. As Cinderella dashes away, the baker’s wife notices her golden shoes and lets go of “Milky-White.” Back in the village, Jack’s mother disapprovingly tosses away the magic beans but awakens the next morning to find an enormous beanstalk. The previous evening, Jack climbed the plant, found a wealthy giant, and stole five gold coins to buy back his beloved cow. Returning to the woods, Jack learns that the baker will not sell “Milky-White” and returns up the beanstalk for more gold. On the second night of their quest, the baker’s wife searches for the lost cow and overhears Rapunzel’s prince tell his fellow nobleman about Rapunzel’s golden locks. After finding the tower, the baker’s wife pretends to be the prince, and convinces the girl to let down her hair. She severs a section of the braid, then unsuccessfully chases Cinderella for her gold shoe. Reuniting, the baker and his wife realize they have three out of the four ingredients for the witch's potion and celebrate. Jack arrives with a golden egg to pay for “Milky-White,” but the cow dies. On the last day before the blue moon, the witch sees Rapunzel’s prince leaving the tower and magically produces a thorny briar patch that leaves him blind. She climbs into Rapunzel’s tower and tells her “daughter” she is protecting her from the dangerous world outside. To ensure the girl will never leave, the witch cuts short Rapunzel’s remaining hair. Meanwhile, young Jack meets Little Red Riding Hood and shows her the pilfered golden egg. When he describes the giant’s harp, the girl dares him to retrieve it. As Jack runs back up the beanstalk and gets the harp, the giant gives chase and falls to his death, bringing the stalk down with him. On the final night of the prince’s festival, Cinderella runs away from the castle and into a trap, leaving her shoes stuck in tar on the palace stairs. She leaves one shoe behind so the prince might find her. Returning to the woods, Cinderella runs into the baker’s wife once again. In order to move faster, she agrees to trade her golden slipper for the wife’s pair of sturdy shoes. In their meeting, the last magic bean falls to the ground and a stalk takes root. Sometime later, the prince discovers Cinderella and carries her off to his castle while the witch banishes Rapunzel to a dark swamp. Rapunzel’s blind prince follows her voice through the woods and, as they reunite, her tears help him regain sight. Elsewhere in the woods, the blue moon begins to eclipse as the baker and his wife convene with the witch. However, she realizes the cow they are offering is not “Milky-White,” and demands to know the dead cow’s whereabouts, so she can revive her. Upon finding Jack at “Milky-White’s” grave, the witch brings the animal back to life and orders the couple to feed the golden shoe, the corn-colored hair, and the red cape to the cow as Jack milks her. When the cow remains dry, the witch announces the ingredients must consist of things she has never touched, and Rapunzel’s hair is therefore useless. Jack suggests they feed “Milky-White” hair from a cornhusk, and the cow suddenly provides the milk needed to complete the witch’s tonic. The witch drinks the milk and regains her beauty while the baker’s wife is suddenly pregnant. Sometime later, Cinderella marries the prince before a crowd, including the now-wealthy Jack and his mother, as well as the baker and his wife with their new baby boy. The festivities are suddenly interrupted by shaking ground and the kingdom is inexorably changed, with many townspeople homeless and dead, including Jack’s mother. People soon realize the temblors are the footsteps of the giant’s angry wife, who climbed down the second beanstalk. The witch declares Jack must be sacrificed to the giant’s wife for the good of the kingdom and sets out to find him. On her journey, she visits Rapunzel, but the girl rejects her and the prince whisks her away. Meanwhile, the baker and his wife leave their infant with Little Red Riding Hood to search for Jack. The baker’s wife, now wearing the scarf she gave her husband, crosses paths with Cinderella’s prince, who kisses her. Confused and disoriented, the baker’s wife fails to run away from the female giant and falls over a cliff. Unaware of his wife’s passing, the baker walks in the opposite direction, finds Cinderella, and escorts her back to the group’s meeting place. Sometime later, the witch brings Jack to the gathering. Seeing his wife’s scarf around Jack’s neck, the baker learns of her death and laments taking on the journey to fulfill their dream of parenthood. As they blame each other for the kingdom’s crisis, the witch offers to accept the burden in return for the baker’s baby boy. Her fervor provokes a storm and she disappears into the swampy earth. The grieving baker leaves his baby with the group but sees an apparition of his father, who apologizes for creating the tragedy, having stolen the witch’s beans. He warns the baker not to follow in his footsteps. Returning to the group, the baker plans to defeat the giant’s wife. As she goes after Jack, her feet become stuck in the swamp and Jack throws a rock at her forehead, killing her. The friends are reunited and decide to live together at the bakery. As the baker wonders aloud how to care for his infant, he is visited by the ghost of his wife. She advises him to tell the boy the story of their journey, as well as the tales of Cinderella, Jack and the beanstalk, and Little Red Riding Hood. She warns that children listen closely, and such stories cast spells that make youths wish for extraordinary things, even if it is not in their best interest for dreams to come true. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award
The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.