Ladies in Love (1936)

97 mins | Comedy-drama | 9 October 1936

Director:

Edward H. Griffith

Writer:

Melville Baker

Cinematographer:

Hal Mohr

Editor:

Ralph Dietrich

Production Designer:

William Darling

Production Company:

Twentieth Century--Fox Film Corp.
Full page view
HISTORY

The working title of this film was Three Girls . The character played by actor Frank Dawson is listed as "Johann" in the end credits, but he is called "Josef" within the film. While the screen credits state that the film was "based on the play by Ladislaus Bus-Fekete" and HR production charts state that the film was based on Bus-Fekete's play Three Girls , a Dec 1935 HR news item states that the studio just purchased Ladies in Love , "a novel by Stanislaus [sic] Bus Fekete that is going to be published in England next year." The novel was published in New York in 1937 in a translation from the Hungarian by Victor Katona and Guy Bolton. According to a HR news item, writer Melville Baker received a three-year contract from the studio as the result of his work on this film. Brian Donlevy is listed as a cast member in early HR production charts. Most likely, he was cast in the role of "Sándor," as midway through the production, Alan Mowbray's listing replaced Donlevy's. This was Constance Bennett's first American film since After Office Hours (see above) which was released early in 1935. Earlier in 1936, she appeared in the British film Everything Is Thunder . Some contemporary sources commented on the rivalry that existed between the leading actresses on the set of this film. A NYT news item stated, "Fox is having its share of woe with Ladies in Love , in which Constance Bennett, Loretta Young, Janet Gaynor and ... More Less

The working title of this film was Three Girls . The character played by actor Frank Dawson is listed as "Johann" in the end credits, but he is called "Josef" within the film. While the screen credits state that the film was "based on the play by Ladislaus Bus-Fekete" and HR production charts state that the film was based on Bus-Fekete's play Three Girls , a Dec 1935 HR news item states that the studio just purchased Ladies in Love , "a novel by Stanislaus [sic] Bus Fekete that is going to be published in England next year." The novel was published in New York in 1937 in a translation from the Hungarian by Victor Katona and Guy Bolton. According to a HR news item, writer Melville Baker received a three-year contract from the studio as the result of his work on this film. Brian Donlevy is listed as a cast member in early HR production charts. Most likely, he was cast in the role of "Sándor," as midway through the production, Alan Mowbray's listing replaced Donlevy's. This was Constance Bennett's first American film since After Office Hours (see above) which was released early in 1935. Earlier in 1936, she appeared in the British film Everything Is Thunder . Some contemporary sources commented on the rivalry that existed between the leading actresses on the set of this film. A NYT news item stated, "Fox is having its share of woe with Ladies in Love , in which Constance Bennett, Loretta Young, Janet Gaynor and Simone Simon are appearing. Each of the young ladies is known for being temperamental and diplomacy has been called into use more than once." Var commented, "the story will appeal almost exclusively to the women." Modern sources list the following additional cast credits: Lynn Bari ( Clerk ), Paul Weigel ( Waiter ), Tony Merlo ( Assistant stage manager ), Paul McVey ( Actor ), Maxine Elliott Hicks ( Girl in audience ), Edward Peil, Jr. ( Boy in audience ), Hector Sarno ( Turkish waiter ), Helen Dickson and Monty Woolley ( Man in box seat ), in what may have been his first screen role. More Less

BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
17 Oct 36.
---
Daily Variety
13 Jul 36
p. 3.
Daily Variety
3 Oct 36
p. 3.
Film Daily
29 Oct 36
p. 11.
Hollywood Reporter
17 Dec 35.
---
Hollywood Reporter
13 Jul 36
p. 9.
Hollywood Reporter
25 Jul 36
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
8 Sep 36
p. 7.
Hollywood Reporter
3 Oct 36
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
17 Oct 36
sect. II, p. 69.
Motion Picture Herald
15 Aug 36
p. 37.
Motion Picture Herald
10 Oct 36
p. 53.
New York Times
6 Sep 36.
---
New York Times
29 Oct 36
p. 31.
Variety
4 Nov 36
p. 18.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
Darryl F. Zanuck in charge of production
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCER
Assoc prod
WRITERS
Contr to scr const
PHOTOGRAPHY
Photog
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
Art dir assoc
FILM EDITORS
Film ed
Ed asst
Ed asst
SET DECORATOR
Set dec
COSTUMES
MUSIC
Mus dir
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the play Three Girls by Ladislaus Bus-Fekete (production undetermined).
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
Three Girls
Release Date:
9 October 1936
Production Date:
13 July--early September 1936
Copyright Claimant:
Twentieth Century--Fox Film Corp.
Copyright Date:
9 October 1936
Copyright Number:
LP6698
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Noiseless Recording
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
97
Length(in feet):
8,695
Length(in reels):
10
Country:
United States
PCA No:
2563
SYNOPSIS

Susie Schmidt, a naïve chorus girl, and her friend, Martha Karenye, who survives by doing odd jobs, rent a large apartment in a fashionable neighborhood in Budapest with Yoli Haydn, a sophisticated model. As they move in, Martha suggests that, according to a gypsy custom, they each count the corners of their room and make a wish. Susie wishes to own a hat shop and be independent of men, while Yoli wishes for a rich husband, and Martha, for a good home, someone to love and children. When Martha tells Dr. Rudi Imri, a poor novice doctor for whom she works, that she has moved across the river, Rudi, upset that she will not be able to come there as often as before, but unable to express his affection for her, fires her. Meanwhile, Yoli's lover, John Barta, visits the apartment with Count Karl Lanyi, who, after meeting Susie, invites her to join them at a party given by playboy Ben Hovath. Susie, infatuated with Karl, is very pleased. At the party, John finds Yoli alone with Horvath and starts to leave. Yoli, who has resolved to remain unaffected regarding John's plans to return to South America on business, leaves with him. Before her performance, Susie confides to Martha that she told Karl she loved him, but then ran away from him. After Susie's chorus number, Martha is called up on stage by Paul Sándor, an egotistical magician. Because she is fascinated by him and also needs a job, she convinces Sándor to hire her as a dresser, cook and all-around servant. Karl is waiting for Susie after the show, and ... +


Susie Schmidt, a naïve chorus girl, and her friend, Martha Karenye, who survives by doing odd jobs, rent a large apartment in a fashionable neighborhood in Budapest with Yoli Haydn, a sophisticated model. As they move in, Martha suggests that, according to a gypsy custom, they each count the corners of their room and make a wish. Susie wishes to own a hat shop and be independent of men, while Yoli wishes for a rich husband, and Martha, for a good home, someone to love and children. When Martha tells Dr. Rudi Imri, a poor novice doctor for whom she works, that she has moved across the river, Rudi, upset that she will not be able to come there as often as before, but unable to express his affection for her, fires her. Meanwhile, Yoli's lover, John Barta, visits the apartment with Count Karl Lanyi, who, after meeting Susie, invites her to join them at a party given by playboy Ben Hovath. Susie, infatuated with Karl, is very pleased. At the party, John finds Yoli alone with Horvath and starts to leave. Yoli, who has resolved to remain unaffected regarding John's plans to return to South America on business, leaves with him. Before her performance, Susie confides to Martha that she told Karl she loved him, but then ran away from him. After Susie's chorus number, Martha is called up on stage by Paul Sándor, an egotistical magician. Because she is fascinated by him and also needs a job, she convinces Sándor to hire her as a dresser, cook and all-around servant. Karl is waiting for Susie after the show, and he drives her home. Meanwhile, John and Yoli agree never to talk of love, but to be satisfied at being happy. In the midst of their discussion, they find Marie Armand, John's seventeen-year-old cousin by marriage, waiting in his apartment. She has run away after breaking off an engagement and seems infatuated with John. In the next few weeks, Martha tries to put some order in Sándor's life and berates him for drinking. To arouse her sympathy, Sándor complains of an affliction he calls "polydigitalitis," which he says affects his nerves and may lead to his inability to perform with his hands. When Martha visits Rudi, he is delighted, but when she tells him of her new job, he accuses her of being in love with Sándor. Meanwhile, Susie, arriving early at Karl's apartment, finds a letter from his fiancée, a countess in Paris whose mother has finally agreed to their marriage. At a club, Susie sees Karl enter with his fiancée, and after Susie effects a graceful exit, Karl calls her a sensible girl and expresses the wish to say goodbye pleasantly. When John reveals to Yoli that he plans to leave the next day on the six o'clock train, he confesses that he earlier returned to Budapest to find a wife who would live with him in the mining camps in the Andes. Yoli is about to open her heart to him, when again they find Marie in his apartment. Yoli leaves upset, and when Marie says that she wants to go with him to South America, they plan to get married and leave together the next day. When Sándor tries to get Martha to tell him she loves him, she admits that she felt happy watching over him when he was sick. He then kisses her passionately, but when he egotistically remarks that he worried, because of her earlier hesitancy, that he might have been losing his grip, she runs away. After Susie sees Karl and his fiancée enter the church to get married, she returns to the apartment where she gets drunk on champagne. Upset at Susie's depiction of her as not having a heart, Yoli leaves, saying that she may go to South America. Susie then puts poison into her own champagne glass, but Martha drinks it by mistake and passes out. At the train station, Yoli confesses to John that she loves him with all her heart, but that she would not say so before because of her pride. However, she sees Marie in the window of the train, and John reveals their marriage plans. Yoli says she is still glad she told him how she felt, then walks away with Horvath. Rudi saves Martha's life and reveals that he has been appointed to the staff of the institute. With Martha's encouragement, he proposes. Later, as Yoli, who has accepted Horvath's proposal, packs, the three ladies review their earlier wishes: Susie now has her hat shop, thanks to Yoli, who now has a rich husband, and Martha has a good home and someone to look after. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

TOP SEARCHES

CASABLANCA

During World War II, Casablanca, Morocco is a waiting point for throngs of desperate refugees fleeing Nazi-occupied Europe. Exit visas, which are necessary to leave the country, are at ... >>

CITIZEN KANE

Seventy-year-old newspaper tycoon Charles Foster Kane dies in his palatial Florida home, Xanadu, after uttering the single word “Rosebud.” While watching a newsreel summarizing the years during which Kane ... >>

REAR WINDOW

Laid up with a broken leg during the height of summer, renowned New York magazine photographer L. B. “Jeff” Jeffries enters his last week of home confinement, bored and ... >>

RAGING BULL

In 1941, at a boxing match in Cleveland, Ohio, pandemonium breaks out when Jake La Motta, an up-and-coming young boxer, loses a decision to Jimmy Reeves, suffering his first ... >>

CITY LIGHTS

At an outdoor dedication ceremony, a tramp is discovered sleeping in the arms of a statue as it is being unveiled before a crowd. He is chased into ... >>

The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.