Garden of the Moon (1938)

90 or 94 mins | Musical | 1 October 1938

Director:

Busby Berkeley

Producer:

Louis F. Edelman

Cinematographer:

Tony Gaudio

Editor:

George Amy

Production Designer:

Robert Haas

Production Company:

Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
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HISTORY

According to Var , many syndicated columnists, in addition to Jimmie Fidler, appeared in the film. HR notes that Dick Powell accepted a layoff rather than work in the film. Modern sources note that Powell was to play John Payne's role and that Bette Davis was originally offered the lead. Although Rudy Vallee is referred to in the film, he does not actually ... More Less

According to Var , many syndicated columnists, in addition to Jimmie Fidler, appeared in the film. HR notes that Dick Powell accepted a layoff rather than work in the film. Modern sources note that Powell was to play John Payne's role and that Bette Davis was originally offered the lead. Although Rudy Vallee is referred to in the film, he does not actually appear. More Less

BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
21 Jul 38
p. 3.
Film Daily
16 Sep 38
p. 7.
Hollywood Reporter
29 Apr 38
p. 1.
Hollywood Reporter
23 May 38
pp. 10-11.
Hollywood Reporter
21 Jul 38
p. 3.
Motion Picture Daily
29 Jul 38
p. 13.
Motion Picture Herald
30 Jul 38
p. 64.
New York Times
24 Sep 38
p. 13.
Variety
17 Aug 38
p. 12.
Variety
21-Sep-38
---
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
A First National Picture
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Dial dir
Dial dir
Asst dir
PRODUCERS
Exec prod
Exec prod
WRITERS
PHOTOGRAPHY
Photog
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
COSTUMES
Gowns
MUSIC
Orch arr
Orch arr
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the short story "Garden of the Moon" by H. Bedford-Jones and John Barton Browne in The Saturday Evening Post (28 Aug--2 Oct 1937).
SONGS
"Garden of the Moon," "The Girl Friend of the Whirling Dervish," "Love Is Where You Find It," "The Lady on the Two Cent Stamp" and "Confidentially," music and lyrics by Harry Warren, Al Dubin and Johnny Mercer.
DETAILS
Release Date:
1 October 1938
Production Date:
early April--late May 1938
Copyright Claimant:
Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
Copyright Date:
22 July 1938
Copyright Number:
LP8259
Physical Properties:
Sound
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
90 or 94
Length(in reels):
10
Country:
United States
PCA No:
4237
SYNOPSIS

When Rudy Vallee has an accident and cannot meet his engagement at the Garden of the Moon nightclub, Toni Blake, the club's press agent, convinces owner John Quinn to hire young bandleader Don Vincente. Don and his band fly out to California from New York for the engagement, but Don almost quits when he learns he is supposed to perform with a woman singer because, in the past, women singers have caused rifts among the musicians. Don's defiance enrages Quinn, who announces that he will end the engagement as soon as Vallee recovers from his accident. The band, which plays swing music, is very popular with the public. Nonetheless, Quinn forces Don to use the woman singer. Don surrounds her with horns so that she cannot be heard, and Quinn retaliates by turning off Don's microphone. Nonplussed, Don sings without it. Hoping to find him a sponsor, so his trip to California will not be a total waste, Toni convinces a chewing gum manufacturer to listen to Don's broadcast. When Quinn hears about her plans, he determines to destroy the broadcast and the next day fires Don. Knowing that Quinn is fascinated by royalty, Toni plants a story about Don's friendship with the Maharajah of Sund. Soon Don is back at work, where Quinn throws a big party for the Maharajah. Toni's plans have succeeded, but Maurice, the maitre-d', almost ruins them when he recognizes the Maharajah as a bad waiter who once worked for him. Despite Don and Toni's efforts, Quinn learns the truth, but Toni convinces him that he will look like a fool if ... +


When Rudy Vallee has an accident and cannot meet his engagement at the Garden of the Moon nightclub, Toni Blake, the club's press agent, convinces owner John Quinn to hire young bandleader Don Vincente. Don and his band fly out to California from New York for the engagement, but Don almost quits when he learns he is supposed to perform with a woman singer because, in the past, women singers have caused rifts among the musicians. Don's defiance enrages Quinn, who announces that he will end the engagement as soon as Vallee recovers from his accident. The band, which plays swing music, is very popular with the public. Nonetheless, Quinn forces Don to use the woman singer. Don surrounds her with horns so that she cannot be heard, and Quinn retaliates by turning off Don's microphone. Nonplussed, Don sings without it. Hoping to find him a sponsor, so his trip to California will not be a total waste, Toni convinces a chewing gum manufacturer to listen to Don's broadcast. When Quinn hears about her plans, he determines to destroy the broadcast and the next day fires Don. Knowing that Quinn is fascinated by royalty, Toni plants a story about Don's friendship with the Maharajah of Sund. Soon Don is back at work, where Quinn throws a big party for the Maharajah. Toni's plans have succeeded, but Maurice, the maitre-d', almost ruins them when he recognizes the Maharajah as a bad waiter who once worked for him. Despite Don and Toni's efforts, Quinn learns the truth, but Toni convinces him that he will look like a fool if he takes revenge on Don. Don has been so successful that the owners of the hotel where the Garden is located want to sign him for twenty-six weeks. Don refuses to sign the contract, however, because the gum manufacturer has offered him a radio program. Quinn begs Toni to help him meet his obligations to the owners, and she convinces Don to do the radio broadcast from Hollywood. Mistakenly, he later decides that Toni is in league with Quinn and quits. Desperately, Quinn enlists the help of gossip columnist Jimmie Fidler, who warns Quinn over the radio that gangsters are out to kill him. Quinn fakes a shooting, and on his supposed death bed, he begs Don to stay. His ruse works and soon Quinn is back to work, as ornery as ever, with Don as his bandleader. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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