Age of Indiscretion (1935)

77 or 80 mins | Drama | 10 May 1935

Director:

Edward Ludwig

Producer:

Phil Goldstone

Cinematographers:

Ernest Haller, George Folsey

Editor:

Hugh Wynn

Production Designer:

Cedric Gibbons

Production Company:

Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, Corp.
Full page view
HISTORY

A HR pre-production news item noted that Mickey Rooney was considered for a part in this picture. A DV pre-production news item stated that the snow scenes would be shot at Lake Tahoe, California. This film marked actress Helen Vinson's first film for M-G-M. It was also producer Philip Goldstone's and director Edward Ludwig's first picture for the studio. Although HR production charts listed actors Samuel Hinds, Mary Jo Matthews and Flush in the cast, their participation in the final film has not been confirmed. An unidentified source in the AMPAS production file credits Howard Bristol with the set decoration along with Edwin B. Willis. According to information in the MPAA/PCA Collection at the AMPAS Library, Age of Indiscretion was rejected by the censor board in Quebec because of the divorce court scenes and ... More Less

A HR pre-production news item noted that Mickey Rooney was considered for a part in this picture. A DV pre-production news item stated that the snow scenes would be shot at Lake Tahoe, California. This film marked actress Helen Vinson's first film for M-G-M. It was also producer Philip Goldstone's and director Edward Ludwig's first picture for the studio. Although HR production charts listed actors Samuel Hinds, Mary Jo Matthews and Flush in the cast, their participation in the final film has not been confirmed. An unidentified source in the AMPAS production file credits Howard Bristol with the set decoration along with Edwin B. Willis. According to information in the MPAA/PCA Collection at the AMPAS Library, Age of Indiscretion was rejected by the censor board in Quebec because of the divorce court scenes and others. More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
26 Feb 35
p. 15.
Daily Variety
6 Mar 35
p. 2.
Daily Variety
2 May 35
p. 3.
Film Daily
18 May 35
p. 4.
Hollywood Reporter
13 Feb 35
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
6 Mar 35
p. 10.
Hollywood Reporter
7 Mar 35
p. 4.
Hollywood Reporter
11 Mar 35
p. 14.
Hollywood Reporter
30 Mar 35
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
2 May 35
p. 3.
Motion Picture Daily
3 May 35
p. 14.
Motion Picture Herald
30 Mar 35
p. 51.
Motion Picture Herald
11 May 35
p. 51.
New York Times
18 May 35
p. 21.
Variety
22 May 35
p. 16.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
WRITERS
Orig story
PHOTOGRAPHY
Photog
Photog
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
Art dir assoc
Art dir assoc
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
COSTUMES
Ward
SOUND
Rec dir
SOURCES
SONGS
"Silent Night, Holy Night," music by Franz Gruber, lyrics by Joseph Mohr, English lyrics, anonymous.
DETAILS
Release Date:
10 May 1935
Production Date:
6 March--late March 1935
Copyright Claimant:
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, Corp.
Copyright Date:
7 May 1935
Copyright Number:
LP5531
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Sound System
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
77 or 80
Length(in reels):
8
Country:
United States
PCA No:
838
SYNOPSIS

When book publisher Robert Lenhart is forced to pay $23,000 in overdue debts to his creditors, he begins to economize both at the office and at home. Bob loves his extravagent wife Eve and is unhappy that he must ask her to cut down on her lavish purchases. Before breaking the news to his wife, the good-natured Bob consults with his secretary, Maxine Bennett, who confirms his fears that Eve may not accept his demands gladly. Maxine's predictions prove true when Eve explodes at her husband, accusing him of not doing what is necessary to maintain high profits at the publishing house. Eve knows that Bob is proud of the company he spent ten years to build and that he refuses to publish novels of lesser quality and higher popularity, such as those written by the ever-popular Jean Oliver. The hard-nosed Eve, having lost her patience with her husband's romantic literary notions, leaves Bob and their son Bill for the wealthy Felix Shaw, with whom she has been having an affair. Spurred on by his wife's departure, Bob decides to consider publishing the novels of Jean Oliver, and arranges a meeting with her. It is the brash and pretentious Oliver who, after flitting around the publisher's office, informs him that the day's papers are carrying the story of Eve's Reno divorce and her marriage to Shaw. Depressed and broken-hearted, Bob then is forced to explain the meaning of divorce to his son, young Bill. When Maxine, a kind woman who secretly loves her boss, takes Bill for an ice skating outing, Bob decides to join them, and the three share ... +


When book publisher Robert Lenhart is forced to pay $23,000 in overdue debts to his creditors, he begins to economize both at the office and at home. Bob loves his extravagent wife Eve and is unhappy that he must ask her to cut down on her lavish purchases. Before breaking the news to his wife, the good-natured Bob consults with his secretary, Maxine Bennett, who confirms his fears that Eve may not accept his demands gladly. Maxine's predictions prove true when Eve explodes at her husband, accusing him of not doing what is necessary to maintain high profits at the publishing house. Eve knows that Bob is proud of the company he spent ten years to build and that he refuses to publish novels of lesser quality and higher popularity, such as those written by the ever-popular Jean Oliver. The hard-nosed Eve, having lost her patience with her husband's romantic literary notions, leaves Bob and their son Bill for the wealthy Felix Shaw, with whom she has been having an affair. Spurred on by his wife's departure, Bob decides to consider publishing the novels of Jean Oliver, and arranges a meeting with her. It is the brash and pretentious Oliver who, after flitting around the publisher's office, informs him that the day's papers are carrying the story of Eve's Reno divorce and her marriage to Shaw. Depressed and broken-hearted, Bob then is forced to explain the meaning of divorce to his son, young Bill. When Maxine, a kind woman who secretly loves her boss, takes Bill for an ice skating outing, Bob decides to join them, and the three share a lovely evening together. Meanwhile, Felix's matronly mother Emma, who longs for a grandson, orders her son to convince his new wife that Bill's proper place is with his mother. After a lengthy quarrel with Felix, Eve grudgingly agrees to fetch her son. However, when she asks Bob for custody of Bill, she is met with resistance, and both agree to let Bill decide. The boy chooses to spend time with his mother as soon as he returns with his father from their planned Christmas vacation in the Adirondack mountains. While vacationing, Bill's sled accidentally runs into Emma, who admonishes the boy for coming onto her property. The next morning, Emma brings Bill a gift and discovers Maxine, who has come to the cabin to bring business-related news, involved in a bedroom pillow fight with Bob and his son. Emma immediately instructs her attorney to bring a suit against Bob based on the scene she had witnessed, and a bitter trial ensues. Bob, genuinely afraid of losing his son, explodes with anger at the insinuations that he and Maxine were indiscreet in front of the boy, and is held in contempt of court. Just as the judge is about to rule in favor of custody for Eve, little Bill, unable to stand any more of the angry proceedings, tells Emma that he despises her, thus prompting her to confess her selfish desire to possess a grandchild at any cost. After Emma admits that she lied and deceived people in order to get Bill, the judge awards Bob custody of his son. Bill, in an act of good will, forgives Emma and invites her to lunch with his father and Maxine. All ends happily as Bob and Maxine face the future together with Bill. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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