The Girl from Missouri (1934)

69-70 or 74-75 mins | Romance | 3 August 1934

Director:

Jack Conway

Producer:

Bernard H. Hyman

Cinematographer:

Ray June

Editor:

Tom Held

Production Designer:

Cedric Gibbons

Production Company:

Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Corp.
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HISTORY

The working titles of this film were 100% Pure, Eadie Was a Lady and Born to Be Kissed. HR, MPD and DV reviewed the picture as Born to Be Kissed. "Eadie Was a Lady" was a popular 1932 ballad composed by B. G. DeSylva, Richard Whiting and Nacio Herb Brown. Although the ballad's story and the film's story bear some resemblance to each other, the film is not actually based on the song. According to a Jul 1934 NYT article, the picture, which was described as "one of the most torrid efforts to emanate from any studio in some time," was "unofficially rejected" by the Hays Office. M-G-M contract director Sam Wood was the original director on the production. According to a HR news item, Wood "asked to be relieved" from the film in late Apr 1934, "because he did not agree with changes in the story as ordered by the Hays Office." Although the same news item stated that M-G-M was shelving the project indefinitely, production charts indicate that director Jack Conway was working on the film by 30 Apr 1934. It is not known how much of Wood's footage remains in the final film. In mid-Mar 1934, Robert Montgomery was announced as the film's lead. Hal Rosson is listed in early HR production charts as the film's photographer. By mid-May 1934, however, Ray June's name appears in the production charts. It is most likely that June replaced Rosson after Wood left the production. Some exteriors for the ...

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The working titles of this film were 100% Pure, Eadie Was a Lady and Born to Be Kissed. HR, MPD and DV reviewed the picture as Born to Be Kissed. "Eadie Was a Lady" was a popular 1932 ballad composed by B. G. DeSylva, Richard Whiting and Nacio Herb Brown. Although the ballad's story and the film's story bear some resemblance to each other, the film is not actually based on the song. According to a Jul 1934 NYT article, the picture, which was described as "one of the most torrid efforts to emanate from any studio in some time," was "unofficially rejected" by the Hays Office. M-G-M contract director Sam Wood was the original director on the production. According to a HR news item, Wood "asked to be relieved" from the film in late Apr 1934, "because he did not agree with changes in the story as ordered by the Hays Office." Although the same news item stated that M-G-M was shelving the project indefinitely, production charts indicate that director Jack Conway was working on the film by 30 Apr 1934. It is not known how much of Wood's footage remains in the final film. In mid-Mar 1934, Robert Montgomery was announced as the film's lead. Hal Rosson is listed in early HR production charts as the film's photographer. By mid-May 1934, however, Ray June's name appears in the production charts. It is most likely that June replaced Rosson after Wood left the production. Some exteriors for the picture were shot in Miami, FL, according to a HR news item. HR production charts also add Shirley Ross, John David Horsley and Russell Hopton to the cast list, but these actors are not included in Call Bureau Cast Service records. Hopton was not seen in the viewed print. Ross's and Horsley's participation in the final film has not been confirmed.

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GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
PERSONAL & COMPANY INDEX CREDITS
CREDIT
HISTORY CREDITS
CREDIT TYPE
CREDIT
Personal note credit:
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
9 Jul 1934
p. 3
Film Daily
4 Aug 1934
p. 3
HF
9 Jun 1934
p. 8
Hollywood Reporter
7 Mar 1934
p. 2
Hollywood Reporter
13 Mar 1934
p. 3
Hollywood Reporter
2 Apr 1934
p. 3, 6
Hollywood Reporter
25 Apr 1934
p. 1
Hollywood Reporter
14 May 1934
p. 10
Hollywood Reporter
8 Jun 1934
p. 3
Hollywood Reporter
9 Jul 1934
p. 3
Motion Picture Daily
10 Jul 1934
p. 7
Motion Picture Herald
21 Jul 1934
p. 46
New York Times
15-Jul-34
---
New York Times
4 Aug 1934
p. 14
Variety
7 Aug 1934
p. 12
CAST
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
Charles C. Wilson
Deacon McDaniel
Montague Shaw
+
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
A Jack Conway Production
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Dir
Asst dir
PRODUCER
WRITERS
Orig scr, Orig scr
Orig scr, Orig scr
Contr to dial
PHOTOGRAPHY
Photog
Hal Rosson
Photog
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
Arnold Gillespie
Art dir assoc
Art dir assoc
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
COSTUMES
Gowns
MUSIC
Mus score
SOUND
Rec dir
DETAILS
Alternate Titles:
100% Pure
Born to Be Kissed
Eadie Was a Lady
Release Date:
3 August 1934
Production Date:
late Mar--6 Jun 1934
Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Metro Goldwyn Mayer Corp.
31 July 1934
LP4872
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Sound System
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
69-70 or 74-75
Length(in reels):
8
Country:
United States
PCA No:
91
Passed by NBR:
Yes
SYNOPSIS

Determined to marry a millionaire and lead a decent life, Eadie Chapman leaves her mother's Missouri beer hall and travels with best friend Kitty Lennihan to New York City. There, she and Kitty find work as chorus girls and eventually are asked to entertain at the home of millionaire Frank Cousins. During his lavish party, Cousins begs T. R. Paige, a self-made millionaire and aspiring diplomat, for financial aid, but Paige, remembering the time when Cousins had refused him a loan, declines to help. After Paige leaves Cousins in his study, Eadie slips in and immediately begins to flirt with him. To Eadie's surprise, Cousins proposes to her and gives her a pair of jeweled cufflinks as an engagement present. As soon as Eadie leaves, however, Cousins kills himself, and Eadie is suspected of stealing the cufflinks. Because Paige helps her to hide the cufflinks from the police, Eadie makes him her new marital target. Although the knowing Paige rebuffs Eadie's flirtations, she pursues him to Palm Beach with Kitty in tow. At Paige's Palm Beach office, Eadie meets his admiring son, Tom Paige, Jr., but refuses to believe that he is related to the millionaire. Tom, however, trails Eadie and Kitty and, after overhearing her gold-digging plans, arranges for her to board the family yacht. To Eadie's humiliation, Tom then proves his identity when he introduces her to his father. The embarrassed Eadie jumps overboard and is followed by Tom, who begins a frustrating two-week courtship of her. In spite of her feelings for Tom, Eadie refuses to give in to his sexual demands, insisting that he marry her or lose her. ...

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Determined to marry a millionaire and lead a decent life, Eadie Chapman leaves her mother's Missouri beer hall and travels with best friend Kitty Lennihan to New York City. There, she and Kitty find work as chorus girls and eventually are asked to entertain at the home of millionaire Frank Cousins. During his lavish party, Cousins begs T. R. Paige, a self-made millionaire and aspiring diplomat, for financial aid, but Paige, remembering the time when Cousins had refused him a loan, declines to help. After Paige leaves Cousins in his study, Eadie slips in and immediately begins to flirt with him. To Eadie's surprise, Cousins proposes to her and gives her a pair of jeweled cufflinks as an engagement present. As soon as Eadie leaves, however, Cousins kills himself, and Eadie is suspected of stealing the cufflinks. Because Paige helps her to hide the cufflinks from the police, Eadie makes him her new marital target. Although the knowing Paige rebuffs Eadie's flirtations, she pursues him to Palm Beach with Kitty in tow. At Paige's Palm Beach office, Eadie meets his admiring son, Tom Paige, Jr., but refuses to believe that he is related to the millionaire. Tom, however, trails Eadie and Kitty and, after overhearing her gold-digging plans, arranges for her to board the family yacht. To Eadie's humiliation, Tom then proves his identity when he introduces her to his father. The embarrassed Eadie jumps overboard and is followed by Tom, who begins a frustrating two-week courtship of her. In spite of her feelings for Tom, Eadie refuses to give in to his sexual demands, insisting that he marry her or lose her. When she then turns down a diamond bracelet in favor of a proposal, career bachelor Tom confides in his father that he is genuinely confused about the gold digger. Paige tells his son to invite Eadie to their mansion, confident that she will reveal her "true colors" in that setting. After Paige leaves the mansion to attend a banquet, Tom tries to seduce Eadie and is startled when she tearfully begs for mercy. Moved by her conviction, Tom allows Eadie to leave, then tells his father that he wants to marry the gold digger. After Tom refuses to heed his advice to drop Eadie, Paige asks the district attorney to assist him in a frame-up. In her apartment, the unsuspecting Eadie is photographed in a compromising situation with a strange man and is arrested on suspicion of stealing Cousins' cufflinks. Eadie then is rejected by a doubting Tom, who is to accompany his father on a European diplomatic mission, but is bailed out of jail by Charlie Turner, a married admirer. Embittered and angry, a drunken Eadie plants herself in Paige's ocean liner stateroom and shows up in her underwear just as the reporters' cameras start to pop. Just before Eadie gives herself to Charlie, however, a repentant Tom rushes in and tries to convince her of his love. At the same time, Paige shows Eadie a newspaper report in which he claimed that her frame-up was a plot by his detractors and that she and Tom already were married when her picture was snapped on the boat. To keep his reputation intact, Paige insists that Eadie and Tom be married immediately by a judge, and Eadie finally is made a lady.

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Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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