Three Hearts for Julia (1943)

89 mins | Romantic comedy | 1943

Director:

Richard Thorpe

Writer:

Lionel Houser

Cinematographer:

George Folsey

Production Designer:

Cedric Gibbons

Production Company:

Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Corp.
Full page view
HISTORY

According to news items in HR , the film was originally scheduled to be directed by Edward Buzzell, who became ill and was replaced by Richard Thorpe. A 22 Sep 1942 news item includes Dink Trout in the cast, but his appearance in the released film has not been confirmed. Another HR news item noted that Electra Simonini was to "strum the harp" as a member of the all-female orchestra, but it is unclear whether she was to be in the cast or provide harp music for the off-screen orchestra. No other contemporary sources include her in the film's credits. Three Hearts for Julia was one of several M-G-M films that were backlogged in late 1942 and may not have been shown throughout the country until early ... More Less

According to news items in HR , the film was originally scheduled to be directed by Edward Buzzell, who became ill and was replaced by Richard Thorpe. A 22 Sep 1942 news item includes Dink Trout in the cast, but his appearance in the released film has not been confirmed. Another HR news item noted that Electra Simonini was to "strum the harp" as a member of the all-female orchestra, but it is unclear whether she was to be in the cast or provide harp music for the off-screen orchestra. No other contemporary sources include her in the film's credits. Three Hearts for Julia was one of several M-G-M films that were backlogged in late 1942 and may not have been shown throughout the country until early 1943. More Less

BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
2 Jan 1943.
---
Daily Variety
6 Jan 43
p. 3.
Film Daily
6 Jan 43
p. 5.
Hollywood Reporter
13 Aug 42
p. 1.
Hollywood Reporter
4 Sep 42
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
22 Sep 42
p. 7.
Hollywood Reporter
8 Oct 42
p. 4.
Hollywood Reporter
13 Oct 42
p. 7.
Hollywood Reporter
20 Oct 42
p. 4.
Hollywood Reporter
25 Nov 42
p. 4.
Hollywood Reporter
6 Jan 43
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
16 Dec 43
p. 3.
Motion Picture Herald
9 Jan 1943.
---
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
14 Nov 43
p. 1009.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
9 Jan 43
p. 1101.
New York Times
21 May 43
p. 22.
Variety
6 Jan 43
p. 50.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCER
WRITER
Story and scr
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Assoc
COSTUMES
Cost supv
MUSIC
Mus score
SOUND
Rec dir
DETAILS
Release Date:
1943
Premiere Information:
New York opening: week of 21 May 1943
Production Date:
4 September--17 October 1942
Copyright Claimant:
Loew's Inc.
Copyright Date:
5 January 1943
Copyright Number:
LP11801
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Sound System
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
89
Length(in feet):
8,086
Length(in reels):
9
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
8967
SYNOPSIS

In the summer of 1941, Lisbon-based foreign correspondent Jeff Seabrook, who has been away from home for two years, turns down a job to head the Berlin bureau of his newspaper, in the hope that he and his wife Julia can spend more time together. In New York, Julia, who is a concert violinist in an all-female orchestra, has a hard time concentrating on her work because she has filed for divorce and is nervous about letting Jeff know. When Jeff learns about the impending divorce, he goes to their home to effect a reconciliation, but finds that several of Julia's fellow musicians are houseguests and hence they have no time to be alone. Soon Jeff learns that Julia, who is fed up with his long absences and broken promises, is being pursued by two men, the orchestra's manager, David Torrance, and music critic Philip Barrows. Jeff's boss, Johnny Girard, convinces him that the best way to win Julia back is to pretend to go along with the divorce, and to prove his acceptance, Jeff tells her that he will help her select his successor. Despite his pretense, Jeff finds every opportunity to pit David and Philip against each other so that he can win Julia back. Meanwhile, the orchestra works hard with its new conductor, refugee Anton Ottoway, who is chagrined to find that he is reduced to dealing with an all-female orchestra. One afternoon, Jeff picks Julia up at the concert hall, ostensibly to drive her to their lawyer's office, but instead "kidnaps" her and takes her to a country retreat where she can think things over. The next morning, Jeff ... +


In the summer of 1941, Lisbon-based foreign correspondent Jeff Seabrook, who has been away from home for two years, turns down a job to head the Berlin bureau of his newspaper, in the hope that he and his wife Julia can spend more time together. In New York, Julia, who is a concert violinist in an all-female orchestra, has a hard time concentrating on her work because she has filed for divorce and is nervous about letting Jeff know. When Jeff learns about the impending divorce, he goes to their home to effect a reconciliation, but finds that several of Julia's fellow musicians are houseguests and hence they have no time to be alone. Soon Jeff learns that Julia, who is fed up with his long absences and broken promises, is being pursued by two men, the orchestra's manager, David Torrance, and music critic Philip Barrows. Jeff's boss, Johnny Girard, convinces him that the best way to win Julia back is to pretend to go along with the divorce, and to prove his acceptance, Jeff tells her that he will help her select his successor. Despite his pretense, Jeff finds every opportunity to pit David and Philip against each other so that he can win Julia back. Meanwhile, the orchestra works hard with its new conductor, refugee Anton Ottoway, who is chagrined to find that he is reduced to dealing with an all-female orchestra. One afternoon, Jeff picks Julia up at the concert hall, ostensibly to drive her to their lawyer's office, but instead "kidnaps" her and takes her to a country retreat where she can think things over. The next morning, Jeff gets word that he is being called up for active duty in the Army, but does not tell Julia. While Jeff is outside, Julia finds the cabin's hidden telephone and calls Philip to come and get her. When Philip arrives, he sees Julia's slippers in Jeff's room and assumes the worst, not knowing that she had actually thrown them at Jeff the night before. Now even more angry at Jeff, Julia goes through with the divorce and stops seeing Philip. On the day that they are to sign the final divorce papers, Jeff goes to see Julia at the concert hall, and they argue, then passionately kiss. Julia still will not take him back, and he leaves without telling her that he is going into the Army the next day. After the concert, Ottoway goes to a local bar to unload his troubles with the female musicians and meets Jeff, whom he immediately likes. After they play a duet on a saw, Ottoway takes an intoxicated Jeff to his place to spend the night. The next morning, as Jeff leaves for active duty, he tells Ottoway that he will be staying with "his uncle" at Fort McHenry. When Ottoway later learns what Jeff meant, he determines to help reunite him with Julia. After hearing that the USO is seeking musicians, Ottoway insists on taking the orchestra on tour and arranges for them to stop at Fort McHenry when he learns that David and Julia plan to marry at the end of the tour. Just before the performance at Fort McHenry, Julia confides in Ottoway, and he tells her that she is still in love with Jeff. She takes his advice to see Jeff, but learns from his commanding officer that it is impossible because Jeff is leaving the next day for overseas. As the concert is about to begin, Julia argues with David over playing what he considers "low-brow" music and breaks off her engagement. During the concert, Julia spontaneously bursts into a solo of "I've Been Working on the Railroad" as Jeff, who is in the wings, happily blows kisses to her. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

TOP SEARCHES

CASABLANCA

During World War II, Casablanca, Morocco is a waiting point for throngs of desperate refugees fleeing Nazi-occupied Europe. Exit visas, which are necessary to leave the country, are at ... >>

CITIZEN KANE

Seventy-year-old newspaper tycoon Charles Foster Kane dies in his palatial Florida home, Xanadu, after uttering the single word “Rosebud.” While watching a newsreel summarizing the years during which Kane ... >>

REAR WINDOW

Laid up with a broken leg during the height of summer, renowned New York magazine photographer L. B. “Jeff” Jeffries enters his last week of home confinement, bored and ... >>

RAGING BULL

In 1941, at a boxing match in Cleveland, Ohio, pandemonium breaks out when Jake La Motta, an up-and-coming young boxer, loses a decision to Jimmy Reeves, suffering his first ... >>

CITY LIGHTS

At an outdoor dedication ceremony, a tramp is discovered sleeping in the arms of a statue as it is being unveiled before a crowd. He is chased into ... >>

The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.