Inspiration (1931)

73-74 or 76 mins | Drama | 31 January 1931

Director:

Clarence Brown

Producer:

Clarence Brown

Cinematographer:

William Daniels

Production Designer:

Cedric Gibbons

Production Company:

Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Corp.
Full page view
HISTORY

Onscreen credits did not mention that this film was based on Alphonse Daudet's novel. Among the many films based on Daudet's novel are: a 1913 Majestic film entitled Sapho, which starred Florence Roberts; a 1917 Paramount film, also entitled Sapho, directed by Hugh Ford and starring Pauline Frederick and Frank Losee (see entry); and the 1934 French film Sapho, directed by Léonce Perret and starring Mary Marquet and Jean Max. A biography of Greta Garbo noted that the actress had difficulties with director Clarence Brown, whom she called "old-fashioned." Although Garbo reportedly threatened to walk off the picture, return to Sweden and never work for Brown again, she completed the film and later went on to do two more films with the ... More Less

Onscreen credits did not mention that this film was based on Alphonse Daudet's novel. Among the many films based on Daudet's novel are: a 1913 Majestic film entitled Sapho, which starred Florence Roberts; a 1917 Paramount film, also entitled Sapho, directed by Hugh Ford and starring Pauline Frederick and Frank Losee (see entry); and the 1934 French film Sapho, directed by Léonce Perret and starring Mary Marquet and Jean Max. A biography of Greta Garbo noted that the actress had difficulties with director Clarence Brown, whom she called "old-fashioned." Although Garbo reportedly threatened to walk off the picture, return to Sweden and never work for Brown again, she completed the film and later went on to do two more films with the director. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
EHW
27 Dec 30
pp. 31-32.
Film Daily
8 Feb 31
p. 10.
HF
11 Oct 30
p. 22.
HF
29 Nov 30
p. 32.
New York Times
9 Feb 31
p. 25.
Variety
11 Feb 31
p. 14.
DETAILS
Release Date:
31 January 1931
Production Date:
early October--late November 1930
Copyright Claimant:
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Distributing Corp.
Copyright Date:
9 February 1931
Copyright Number:
LP1960
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Sound System
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
73-74 or 76
Length(in reels):
10
Country:
United States
Language:
English
Passed by NBR:
Yes
SYNOPSIS

In Paris, artist's model Yvonne has been immortalized by the painter Jouvet, the sculptor Henry Coutant and Galand, the author of a book of love. Said to be "as well-known as the Eiffel Tower," the popular and free-spirited Yvonne has served as the inspiration to some of the greatest artists and writers in Europe. At a party attended by bohemians and artists, Yvonne becomes bored by the pretentious guests, including Coutant, who tries to rekindle his romance with the model to no avail. Yvonne sulks in a corner until she meets the handsome André Montell, who, to her astonishment, is not an artist, but a student studying at the Consular Service. Immediately taken by André, Yvonne suggests that they leave the party. Yvonne neglects to tell her husband Vignaud, whom she does not love, that she is leaving with another man. She also neglects to tell André that she is married. A romance between André and the model soon flourishes, and Yvonne shows her willingness to give up the security and comfort of her marriage for André. Meanwhile, André is visited by his uncle Julian and Madeleine, a childhood playmate of his. Yvonne instantly becomes jealous of André's attentions to Madeleine. Later, after Yvonne tells her husband that she does not plan to return to him, she tries to throw him out of his own house. André, overhearing the fracas, realizes that Yvonne is married and after apologizing to Vignaud for the affair, leaves. Later, while modelling for Coutant, Yvonne tells André that she loves only him, but she is immediately attacked by Odette, a jealous model who insinuates that Yvonne ... +


In Paris, artist's model Yvonne has been immortalized by the painter Jouvet, the sculptor Henry Coutant and Galand, the author of a book of love. Said to be "as well-known as the Eiffel Tower," the popular and free-spirited Yvonne has served as the inspiration to some of the greatest artists and writers in Europe. At a party attended by bohemians and artists, Yvonne becomes bored by the pretentious guests, including Coutant, who tries to rekindle his romance with the model to no avail. Yvonne sulks in a corner until she meets the handsome André Montell, who, to her astonishment, is not an artist, but a student studying at the Consular Service. Immediately taken by André, Yvonne suggests that they leave the party. Yvonne neglects to tell her husband Vignaud, whom she does not love, that she is leaving with another man. She also neglects to tell André that she is married. A romance between André and the model soon flourishes, and Yvonne shows her willingness to give up the security and comfort of her marriage for André. Meanwhile, André is visited by his uncle Julian and Madeleine, a childhood playmate of his. Yvonne instantly becomes jealous of André's attentions to Madeleine. Later, after Yvonne tells her husband that she does not plan to return to him, she tries to throw him out of his own house. André, overhearing the fracas, realizes that Yvonne is married and after apologizing to Vignaud for the affair, leaves. Later, while modelling for Coutant, Yvonne tells André that she loves only him, but she is immediately attacked by Odette, a jealous model who insinuates that Yvonne is a wanton woman with a sordid past. Although Yvonne tries to convince André that the allegations are not true, he does not believe her and tells her that he wants to forget that he ever knew her. On her way out, Yvonne slaps Odette for driving André away. Time passes, and Yvonne, destitute, walks by André on the street near his school, but he ignores her. When Yvonne is unable to pay a small bill at a nearby cafe, André sees her distress and pays it for her. He then takes her to dinner and realizes that she has been living like a pauper. Before André leaves for Algiers, Yvonne discovers that he is going to marry another woman and calls him a coward and a liar for not telling her earlier. Tragedy strikes when Yvonne's friend Liane Latour commits suicide after being spurned by playboy Delval. Shocked by the news, André fears the same fate may befall Yvonne and decides to return to her. However, since André last saw Yvonne, she has been seeing Mr. Normand, an ex-lover who was imprisoned for writing bad checks. Intent on preventing her suicide, André pleads with Yvonne to marry him, and she accepts. Later, though, Yvonne realizes that he came back to her out of sympathy. After writing André a farewell letter, in which she tells him to forget her and marry the right woman, Yvonne leaves him. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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