Day of Reckoning (1933)

65, 67 or 70 mins | Drama | 27 October 1933

Director:

Charles Brabin

Cinematographer:

Ted Tetzlaff

Editor:

Adrienne Fazan

Production Designer:

Eddie Imazu

Production Company:

Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Corp.
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HISTORY

The working titles of this film were Forever Faithful and Hall of Justice . HR reviewed the picture as Forever Faithful . According to HR news items, Richard Boleslavsky was first hired to direct the production, then was replaced by Russell Mack so that Boleslavsky could direct M-G-M's Hollywood Party . Charles Brabin took over direction after Mack was reassigned to another picture. HR news items announced that M-G-M wanted Richard Barthelmess for the film's lead but felt his salary demands were too high. Although a HR news item announced Genevieve Tobin as a featured player, that actress probably did not appear in the picture. Modern sources note that the film was shot in two weeks, an unusually brief time for an M-G-M production. Day of Reckoning was the only film that Richard Dix made at the ... More Less

The working titles of this film were Forever Faithful and Hall of Justice . HR reviewed the picture as Forever Faithful . According to HR news items, Richard Boleslavsky was first hired to direct the production, then was replaced by Russell Mack so that Boleslavsky could direct M-G-M's Hollywood Party . Charles Brabin took over direction after Mack was reassigned to another picture. HR news items announced that M-G-M wanted Richard Barthelmess for the film's lead but felt his salary demands were too high. Although a HR news item announced Genevieve Tobin as a featured player, that actress probably did not appear in the picture. Modern sources note that the film was shot in two weeks, an unusually brief time for an M-G-M production. Day of Reckoning was the only film that Richard Dix made at the studio. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
3 Oct 33
p. 3.
Film Daily
8 Sep 33
p. 6.
Film Daily
4 Nov 33
p. 4.
Hollywood Reporter
3 Aug 33
p. 1.
Hollywood Reporter
15 Aug 33
p. 7.
Hollywood Reporter
21 Aug 33
p. 1.
Hollywood Reporter
28 Aug 33
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
10 Oct 33
p. 3.
Motion Picture Daily
4 Nov 33
p. 2.
Motion Picture Herald
11 Nov 33
pp. 30-31.
New York Times
4 Nov 33
p. 18.
Variety
7 Nov 33
p. 16.
DETAILS
Alternate Titles:
Forever Faithful
Hall of Justice
Release Date:
27 October 1933
Copyright Claimant:
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Corp.
Copyright Date:
23 October 1933
Copyright Number:
LP4207
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Sound System
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
65, 67 or 70
Length(in reels):
7
Country:
United States
Passed by NBR:
Yes
SYNOPSIS

Because he is unable to say no to his loving but extravagant wife Dorothy, John Day, an employee of a building and loan company, has fallen into deep debt. Consequently, while celebrating his birthday with friends, John is arrested for embezzlement and is taken to the county jail. After her request for a bail loan is turned down by a number of her friends, Dorothy seeks help from George Hollins, a prosperous businessman. Hollins, who has long lusted after Dorothy, agrees to help John by paying for his legal services, but quietly orders the lawyer to try the case in a manner that will assure John a jail sentence. After John is sentenced to a two-year jail term, Dorothy vows to visit him every day and is, at first, faithful to her pledge. Eventually, however, Dorothy's financial situation becomes desperate, and she returns to Hollins for help in finding a job. Although Dorothy has no clerical skills, Hollins insists that she take a job in his office, an offer that evokes the jealousy of his former lover, Kate Lovett, the head of his secretarial pool. As Dorothy increasingly is distracted by the amorous attentions of Hollins, her visits to John decrease. Only Mamie, the Days's devoted maid, maintains her loyalty to John and tries in vain to keep Dorothy "honest." While Dorothy dates Hollins, Mamie arranges for John to view his two young children from his jail cell window. Thrilled by the sight of his children, John makes excuses for Dorothy's absence and maintains to Hart, his fellow convict, his wife's unflagging fidelity. Kate, however, is less sure of Dorothy and finally accuses ... +


Because he is unable to say no to his loving but extravagant wife Dorothy, John Day, an employee of a building and loan company, has fallen into deep debt. Consequently, while celebrating his birthday with friends, John is arrested for embezzlement and is taken to the county jail. After her request for a bail loan is turned down by a number of her friends, Dorothy seeks help from George Hollins, a prosperous businessman. Hollins, who has long lusted after Dorothy, agrees to help John by paying for his legal services, but quietly orders the lawyer to try the case in a manner that will assure John a jail sentence. After John is sentenced to a two-year jail term, Dorothy vows to visit him every day and is, at first, faithful to her pledge. Eventually, however, Dorothy's financial situation becomes desperate, and she returns to Hollins for help in finding a job. Although Dorothy has no clerical skills, Hollins insists that she take a job in his office, an offer that evokes the jealousy of his former lover, Kate Lovett, the head of his secretarial pool. As Dorothy increasingly is distracted by the amorous attentions of Hollins, her visits to John decrease. Only Mamie, the Days's devoted maid, maintains her loyalty to John and tries in vain to keep Dorothy "honest." While Dorothy dates Hollins, Mamie arranges for John to view his two young children from his jail cell window. Thrilled by the sight of his children, John makes excuses for Dorothy's absence and maintains to Hart, his fellow convict, his wife's unflagging fidelity. Kate, however, is less sure of Dorothy and finally accuses Hollins of shameless adultery. After Hollins angrily fires her, Kate swears revenge and storms from the office in a fury. That night, Kate sneaks into Hollins' apartment and overhears Dorothy and he pledging their mutual love. Incensed with jealousy, Kate confronts the couple at gunpoint and coldly shoots and kills her rival. Hollins assumes the blame for the killing and ends up in the same jail as John. When John's convict friend Harry, who, like John, has read about Dorothy's murder in the newspapers, realizes that Hollins has been assigned to his cell, he beats him unconscious. To be near Hollins, who has been transferred to the jail hospital and has been warned by Hart not to squeal on Harry, John feigns illness. On the hospital's rooftop, John sneaks up to an unsuspecting Hollins and begins to fight him. During the melee, Hart comes on the rooftop and, seeing John in mortal danger, pushes Hollins over the edge. Hart assumes responsibility for Hollins' death, and John eventually is released. After John is happily reunited with his children and Mamie in the country, Mamie accepts the proposal of Jerry, a milkman who has longed loved her. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.