It's a Small World (1935)

71-72 mins | Screwball comedy | 12 April 1935

Director:

Irving Cummings

Producer:

Edward Butcher

Cinematographer:

Arthur Miller

Production Designer:

William Darling

Production Company:

Fox Film Corp.
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HISTORY

The plot summary was based on a screen continuity in the Twentieth Century-Fox Produced Scripts Collection, and the onscreen credits were taken from a screen credit sheet in the Twentieth Century-Fox Records of the Legal Department, both of which are at the UCLA Theater Arts Library. This was English actress Wendy Barrie's first American film. According to information in the legal records, Vivian Tobin was originally cast as "Nancy Naylor" and Robert Burns as "Buck Bogardus." According to a DV news item, Spencer Tracy was hit above the right eye with a plate durig a dish-tossing scene between him and Wendy Barrie, and production was stopped for a few days because the wound prevented Tracy from wearing heavy makeup. A FD news item noted that a transplanted barn on director Irving Cummings' estate in the San Fernando Valley, which formed a background for the first production he ever acted in, At the Window , in Mount Vernon, NY, would be used as a background in this ... More Less

The plot summary was based on a screen continuity in the Twentieth Century-Fox Produced Scripts Collection, and the onscreen credits were taken from a screen credit sheet in the Twentieth Century-Fox Records of the Legal Department, both of which are at the UCLA Theater Arts Library. This was English actress Wendy Barrie's first American film. According to information in the legal records, Vivian Tobin was originally cast as "Nancy Naylor" and Robert Burns as "Buck Bogardus." According to a DV news item, Spencer Tracy was hit above the right eye with a plate durig a dish-tossing scene between him and Wendy Barrie, and production was stopped for a few days because the wound prevented Tracy from wearing heavy makeup. A FD news item noted that a transplanted barn on director Irving Cummings' estate in the San Fernando Valley, which formed a background for the first production he ever acted in, At the Window , in Mount Vernon, NY, would be used as a background in this film. More Less

BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
29-Jun-35
---
Daily Variety
15 Feb 35
p. 3.
Daily Variety
2 Mar 35
p. 2.
Daily Variety
25 Mar 35
p. 3.
Film Daily
12 Feb 35
p. 6.
Film Daily
21 Mar 35
p. 8.
HF
2 Feb 35
p. 8.
Hollywood Reporter
31 Jan 35
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
4 Feb 35
p. 8.
Hollywood Reporter
7 Mar 35
p. 14.
Hollywood Reporter
25 Mar 35
p. 3.
Motion Picture Daily
27 Mar 35
p. 6.
Motion Picture Herald
16 Mar 35
p. 35.
Motion Picture Herald
6 Apr 35
p. 48, 50
Variety
26 Jun 35
p. 26.
DETAILS
Release Date:
12 April 1935
Production Date:
2 February--2 March 1935
Copyright Claimant:
Fox Film Corp.
Copyright Date:
12 April 1935
Copyright Number:
LP5512
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Noiseless Recording
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
71-72
Length(in feet):
6,445
Length(in reels):
7
Country:
United States
PCA No:
709
SYNOPSIS

Jane Dale, a St. Louis society girl vacationing with her mother in New Orleans, takes her cousin Nancy Naylor's car to return to St. Louis, as she's tired of reading tabloid accounts of Nancy's third divorce. Jane, a reckless driver, crashes into lawyer Bill Shevlin's car on a country road in Louisiana, when Bill moves into the oncoming lane to let a herd of cattle pass. A calf is killed in the accident, and Bill scoffs when Jane threatens to sue him. The two bicker and banter the whole night until the judge of a nearby town comes by the next morning and tows their cars. The judge tries Bill and Jane in his court for neglectful recklessness. Bill is found guilty and must pay a fine, but Jane flirts with the townies, who then act as witnesses and unanimously state her innocence. Jane has Bill's car stripped of its parts in order to repair her own battered vehicle, and when she can't pay him the money for the parts, the judge evokes the Napoleonic code, which gives Bill the right to "seize the body" of the debtor. Jane says that she'd rather go to jail than be under Bill's authority, but when the ingenious lawyer brings a group of town drunks to the jail cell, she loses her courage. The couple flirt while washing dishes at the hotel that night, and later they discuss marriage, with Bill admitting his hatred of divorce as he sees scores of women every day who come into his office for their fourth and fifth divorce. Later Cal, the car mechanic, informs Bill that Jane's car is ... +


Jane Dale, a St. Louis society girl vacationing with her mother in New Orleans, takes her cousin Nancy Naylor's car to return to St. Louis, as she's tired of reading tabloid accounts of Nancy's third divorce. Jane, a reckless driver, crashes into lawyer Bill Shevlin's car on a country road in Louisiana, when Bill moves into the oncoming lane to let a herd of cattle pass. A calf is killed in the accident, and Bill scoffs when Jane threatens to sue him. The two bicker and banter the whole night until the judge of a nearby town comes by the next morning and tows their cars. The judge tries Bill and Jane in his court for neglectful recklessness. Bill is found guilty and must pay a fine, but Jane flirts with the townies, who then act as witnesses and unanimously state her innocence. Jane has Bill's car stripped of its parts in order to repair her own battered vehicle, and when she can't pay him the money for the parts, the judge evokes the Napoleonic code, which gives Bill the right to "seize the body" of the debtor. Jane says that she'd rather go to jail than be under Bill's authority, but when the ingenious lawyer brings a group of town drunks to the jail cell, she loses her courage. The couple flirt while washing dishes at the hotel that night, and later they discuss marriage, with Bill admitting his hatred of divorce as he sees scores of women every day who come into his office for their fourth and fifth divorce. Later Cal, the car mechanic, informs Bill that Jane's car is registered under the name Nancy Naylor and that he discovered a court summons for a divorce hearing in her glove compartment. Bill recognizes Nancy's name and believes that he has been made the fool by this thrice-divorced society girl. He confronts Jane, who cries and flees. The judge discovers that Jane has stolen the car that she is driving, and Bill realizes his mistake. He finds Jane, reaffirms his vow of love, and they leave as Jane's mother, Nancy and Jane's former fiancé, Freddie Thompson, arrive. The couple happily drive past the group in the car built with their united parts. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.