The Night of June 13 (1932)

72 or 76 mins | Drama | 23 September 1932

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HISTORY

The working title for the film was Suburb , the title of Vera Caspary's story. This was the first film in which Charlie Ruggles and Mary Boland appeared as husband and wife. They became known for their portrayal of a hen-pecked husband and his socially ambitious wife, repeated in films throughout the ... More Less

The working title for the film was Suburb , the title of Vera Caspary's story. This was the first film in which Charlie Ruggles and Mary Boland appeared as husband and wife. They became known for their portrayal of a hen-pecked husband and his socially ambitious wife, repeated in films throughout the 1930s. More Less

BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Film Daily
17 Sep 32
p. 22.
Hollywood Reporter
14 Jun 32
p. 1.
Hollywood Reporter
3 Sep 32
p. 2.
Motion Picture Herald
17 Sep 32
p. 38
New York Times
17 Sep 32
p. 18.
Variety
20 Sep 32
p. 15.
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
Suburb
Release Date:
23 September 1932
Copyright Claimant:
Paramount- Publix Corp.
Copyright Date:
19 September 1932
Copyright Number:
LP3265
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Noiseless Recording
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
72 or 76
Length(in reels):
8
Country:
United States
SYNOPSIS

At 1130 Laurel Avenue, in the small American suburb of Glenwood Park, Elna Curry develops an unfounded jealousy of her neighbor, Trudie Morrow, who has been driving her husband John to the commuter depot. Elna was a concert pianist until she and John had an automobile accident, and since then, she has suffered from neurasthenia. When she sees Trudie with a compact that is the same as the one John gave her, Elna's jealousy turns into vengeance, and she vows to make Trudie pay for breaking up her home. When John explains the delicate situation to Trudie, she good-naturedly packs her bags. On the night of June thirteenth, Trudie offers John a ride home so she can explain her impending departure to him. When John fails to return on his usual train, Elna plays her piano maniacally, imagining John running off with Trudie. She writes a suicide note to John, accusing him of leaving her for Trudy, then shoots herself. When John arrives home and finds Elna dead, he burns her suicide note to protect Trudie, and calls the police, who accuse him of murder. At the trial, John claims to have taken a later train to shield Trudie, who is unaware that he is on trial, and the prosecution accuses him of perjury. Because of their own secrets, John's neighbors submit false testimony, which damages John's case. One of them, young Herbert Morrow, claims he saw John get off his regular commuter train to hide the fact that he and his girl friend, Ginger Blake, were eloping at the time. Finally, Ginger tells her mother the truth, and the two women ... +


At 1130 Laurel Avenue, in the small American suburb of Glenwood Park, Elna Curry develops an unfounded jealousy of her neighbor, Trudie Morrow, who has been driving her husband John to the commuter depot. Elna was a concert pianist until she and John had an automobile accident, and since then, she has suffered from neurasthenia. When she sees Trudie with a compact that is the same as the one John gave her, Elna's jealousy turns into vengeance, and she vows to make Trudie pay for breaking up her home. When John explains the delicate situation to Trudie, she good-naturedly packs her bags. On the night of June thirteenth, Trudie offers John a ride home so she can explain her impending departure to him. When John fails to return on his usual train, Elna plays her piano maniacally, imagining John running off with Trudie. She writes a suicide note to John, accusing him of leaving her for Trudy, then shoots herself. When John arrives home and finds Elna dead, he burns her suicide note to protect Trudie, and calls the police, who accuse him of murder. At the trial, John claims to have taken a later train to shield Trudie, who is unaware that he is on trial, and the prosecution accuses him of perjury. Because of their own secrets, John's neighbors submit false testimony, which damages John's case. One of them, young Herbert Morrow, claims he saw John get off his regular commuter train to hide the fact that he and his girl friend, Ginger Blake, were eloping at the time. Finally, Ginger tells her mother the truth, and the two women retrieve Trudie in time to provide John with a real alibi. John's neighbor, "Grandpop" Strawn, who hid the fact that he received bootleg liquor at the time of the murder in order to spare himself his daughter-in-law Maizie's haranguing, finally steps forward with his friend Otto, who was mistaken for John when he dropped off the liquor. Together, they lie, swearing they saw John get off the later train, and he is acquitted. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.