Spring Parade (1940)

89 mins | Drama | 27 September 1940

Director:

Henry Koster

Producer:

Joe Pasternak

Cinematographer:

Joseph Valentine

Production Designer:

Jack Otterson

Production Company:

Universal Pictures Co.
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HISTORY

According to an item in NYT, the Los Angeles River doubled for the Danube River in this film. This picture was nominated for the following Academy Awards: Best Song, "Waltzing in the Clouds,"; Best Score (Charles Previn); Best Cinematography (Joseph Valetine); and Best Sound Recording (Bernard B. Brown). In 1934, Joe Pasternak produced a version of this film in Budapest. ...

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According to an item in NYT, the Los Angeles River doubled for the Danube River in this film. This picture was nominated for the following Academy Awards: Best Song, "Waltzing in the Clouds,"; Best Score (Charles Previn); Best Cinematography (Joseph Valetine); and Best Sound Recording (Bernard B. Brown). In 1934, Joe Pasternak produced a version of this film in Budapest.

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GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
PERSONAL & COMPANY INDEX CREDITS
CREDIT
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
25 Sep 1940
p. 3
Film Daily
26 Sep 1940
p. 7
Hollywood Reporter
20 May 1940
p. 11
Hollywood Reporter
20 Sep 1940
p. 5
Hollywood Reporter
25 Sep 1940
p. 3
Motion Picture Daily
26 Sep 1940
p. 3
Motion Picture Herald
28 Sep 1940
p. 80
New York Times
28-Jul-40
---
New York Times
4 Oct 1940
p. 29
Variety
2 Oct 1940
p. 12
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
A Henry Koster Production
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCER
WRITERS
Orig story
PHOTOGRAPHY
Joe Valentine
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
Art dir assoc
FILM EDITOR
SET DECORATOR
R. A. Gausman
Set dec
COSTUMES
Gowns
MUSIC
Mus dir
Vocal coach
SOUND
[Sd] tech
DANCE
Dances by
PRODUCTION MISC
Tech adv
SOURCES
SONGS
"It's Foolish But It's Fun," "Waltzing in the Clouds" and "When April Sings," music by Robert Stolz, lyrics by Gus Kahn; "Blue Danube Dream," by Hans Salter and Gus Kahn.
SONGWRITER/COMPOSER
DETAILS
Release Date:
27 September 1940
Production Date:
began late May 1940
Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Universal Pictures Co.
30 September 1940
LP9943
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Mirrophonic Recording
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
89
Length(in reels):
10
Country:
United States
PCA No:
6603
SYNOPSIS

In a mountain village close to Vienna, Ilonka Tolnay buys a fortune card at a carnival and receives the following fortune: "Your future is in Vienna/Your husband will be an artist/Your friend in need will be a great and powerful man/But be careful, true love will hit you with a stick." An eminently practical young country woman, Ilonka scoffs at the idea of ever going to Vienna but, after a dizzying folk dance, falls asleep in a hay wagon headed for Vienna. When she awakens, she decides to continue on her pre-destined path, and the kindly driver, baker Ladislaus Tescheck, offers to let her stay with him at his bakery. Ilonka shares a bedroom with Jenny, who works in the bakery and flirts with the soldiers passing on parade in the street below. Drummer Harry Marten looks up and sees Jenny smile and, thinking this an invitation, brings her flowers at the bakery. Jenny is flattered by the attention, but when her boyfriend, Count Zorndorf, comes in to see her, she pretends that Harry is there to see Ilonka. Harry later sends a message to Jenny to meet him at the wine garden that night, but the baker's mischievous nephews give the note to Ilonka. She sheds her dirndl for one of Jenny's more sophisticated dresses and awaits Harry, who is disappointed when he realizes that Ilonka is his date for the evening. Ilonka's country ways embarrass Harry, but when he is inspired to compose music, Ilonka enthusiastically quiets the restaurant, and then gets the orchestra to play his piece. Ilonka, a beautiful singer herself, considers musicians to be artists, and ...

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In a mountain village close to Vienna, Ilonka Tolnay buys a fortune card at a carnival and receives the following fortune: "Your future is in Vienna/Your husband will be an artist/Your friend in need will be a great and powerful man/But be careful, true love will hit you with a stick." An eminently practical young country woman, Ilonka scoffs at the idea of ever going to Vienna but, after a dizzying folk dance, falls asleep in a hay wagon headed for Vienna. When she awakens, she decides to continue on her pre-destined path, and the kindly driver, baker Ladislaus Tescheck, offers to let her stay with him at his bakery. Ilonka shares a bedroom with Jenny, who works in the bakery and flirts with the soldiers passing on parade in the street below. Drummer Harry Marten looks up and sees Jenny smile and, thinking this an invitation, brings her flowers at the bakery. Jenny is flattered by the attention, but when her boyfriend, Count Zorndorf, comes in to see her, she pretends that Harry is there to see Ilonka. Harry later sends a message to Jenny to meet him at the wine garden that night, but the baker's mischievous nephews give the note to Ilonka. She sheds her dirndl for one of Jenny's more sophisticated dresses and awaits Harry, who is disappointed when he realizes that Ilonka is his date for the evening. Ilonka's country ways embarrass Harry, but when he is inspired to compose music, Ilonka enthusiastically quiets the restaurant, and then gets the orchestra to play his piece. Ilonka, a beautiful singer herself, considers musicians to be artists, and has fulfilled the second decree of her fortune by falling in love with Harry, whose true love is music, not the military. That night, Ilonka receives permission from Tescheck to stay longer at the bakery and unknown to him, slips a note and Harry's composition into Tescheck's special salt rolls which are intended for the Emperor. The note informs the Emperor that a certain musician is being persecuted by the army because he is not allowed to compose music while he is a soldier. The Emperor's officials arrest Tescheck for attempting to poison the Emperor. Ilonka confesses her misdeed to Jenny, who, through the count, arranges for Ilonka to meet the Emperor and explain the situation. While Ilonka is at dinner learning the proper etiquette with which to approach royalty, Tescheck's nephews tell Harry that Ilonka is really from Vienna and is dating another man. Furious, Harry shows up at the restaurant and pokes fun at Ilonka and her companions and makes love to another woman. Ilonka rebuffs him with a slap and, during her interview with the Emperor, who is charmed by her sweet country ways, tells him she was wrong about the composer. The Emperor releases Tescheck and gives him the title of Court Baker, and later invites Ilonka to a court ball. At first Ilonka refuses to go, intending to return home, but seeing Tescheck's disappointment at missing the opportunity of being her escort to the palace, attends the royal ball. Once there, the Emperor asks her to sing for him, and when Ilonka stands by the orchestra, she discovers that Harry is the conductor and that the Emperor has set her up, knowing that she is in love. While Ilonka sings Harry's composition, Harry accidentally hits her head with his baton. Realizing she has found her true love, Ilonka forgives him, and they dance the waltz together.

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Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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