Exposed (1938)

60 or 63 mins | Drama | 4 November 1938

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HISTORY

George R. Bilson's unpublished story was entitled "Candid Camera Girl." Set decorator's R. A. Gausman's last name is mistakenly spelled "Grauman" in the film's onscreen ... More Less

George R. Bilson's unpublished story was entitled "Candid Camera Girl." Set decorator's R. A. Gausman's last name is mistakenly spelled "Grauman" in the film's onscreen credits. More Less

BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
20 Nov 38
p. 3.
Film Daily
28 Nov 38
p. 4.
Hollywood Reporter
3 Sep 38
p. 9.
Hollywood Reporter
21 Nov 38
p. 3.
Motion Picture Daily
29 Nov 38
p. 2.
Motion Picture Herald
15 Oct 38
p. 30.
Motion Picture Herald
26 Nov 38
p. 24.
New York Times
21 Nov 38
p. 14.
Variety
23 Nov 38
p. 14.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
Asst dir
PRODUCER
WRITERS
Orig scr, Orig scr
Orig scr, Orig scr
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Asst cam
Asst cam
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
Art dir assoc
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATOR
COSTUMES
Gowns
Ward
MUSIC
Mus dir
SOUND
Sd tech
MAKEUP
Makeup
PRODUCTION MISC
Scr clerk
Props
Best boy
Still photog
STAND INS
Stand in
Stand in
Stand in
Stand in
DETAILS
Release Date:
4 November 1938
Production Date:
9 September--21 September 1938
Copyright Claimant:
Universal Pictures Co., Inc.
Copyright Date:
4 November 1938
Copyright Number:
LP8390
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Mirrophonic Sound System
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
60 or 63
Length(in reels):
6
Country:
United States
PCA No:
4769
SYNOPSIS

Claire "Click" Stewart is a photographer for Flash Magazine, which has a reputation for scooping everyone. After Steve Conway, her editor, orders her to find a story that no one else has, she discovers William Reardon, a lawyer who disappeared several years before, living as a tramp. When her photos are published, Reardon sues the magazine. Click meets with Reardon to try to talk him into dismissing his suit. He tells her that he quit his law practice after convicting an innocent man. Click offers to find the man's daughter so Reardon can make restitution, providing he will then drop his suit, and he agrees. She learns, however, that the daughter, Margaret Spencer, died in an automobile accident. Desperate, she proposes that her roommate, Betty Clarke, an aspiring actress, pretend to be Margaret. Reardon is satisfied and the story makes the newspapers. Mike Romero, knowing that Margaret is dead, tries to blackmail Betty. Click discovers that he works for racketeer Tony Mitchell. Planning to expose his protection racket in retaliation for Romero's actions, Click follows him one night, accompanied by Reardon. Reardon is working as a lawyer again and, recognizing Romero, decides to gather enough evidence to arrest him. Meanwhile, Reardon and Click are falling in love. When Steve publishes Click's pictures of Mitchell's men in action, he places her life in jeopardy. Having learned that Margaret is dead, Reardon tracks down Click, who is meeting with Mitchell, and recognizes Mitchell as the man who framed Spencer. After Reardon successfully prosecutes the gang, he apologizes to Click and they ... +


Claire "Click" Stewart is a photographer for Flash Magazine, which has a reputation for scooping everyone. After Steve Conway, her editor, orders her to find a story that no one else has, she discovers William Reardon, a lawyer who disappeared several years before, living as a tramp. When her photos are published, Reardon sues the magazine. Click meets with Reardon to try to talk him into dismissing his suit. He tells her that he quit his law practice after convicting an innocent man. Click offers to find the man's daughter so Reardon can make restitution, providing he will then drop his suit, and he agrees. She learns, however, that the daughter, Margaret Spencer, died in an automobile accident. Desperate, she proposes that her roommate, Betty Clarke, an aspiring actress, pretend to be Margaret. Reardon is satisfied and the story makes the newspapers. Mike Romero, knowing that Margaret is dead, tries to blackmail Betty. Click discovers that he works for racketeer Tony Mitchell. Planning to expose his protection racket in retaliation for Romero's actions, Click follows him one night, accompanied by Reardon. Reardon is working as a lawyer again and, recognizing Romero, decides to gather enough evidence to arrest him. Meanwhile, Reardon and Click are falling in love. When Steve publishes Click's pictures of Mitchell's men in action, he places her life in jeopardy. Having learned that Margaret is dead, Reardon tracks down Click, who is meeting with Mitchell, and recognizes Mitchell as the man who framed Spencer. After Reardon successfully prosecutes the gang, he apologizes to Click and they kiss. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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