The Worst Woman in Paris? (1933)

75 or 78 mins | Drama | 20 October 1933

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HISTORY

Var reported that producer Jesse L. Lasky first attempted to borrow Jean Harlow from M-G-M for the lead, and then Claudette Colbert from Paramount when M-G-M turned down his request. According to HR and FD news items, Myrna Loy was signed to play "Peggy Vane," and when she was forced to relinquish the role due to poor health, she was to be replaced by Carole Lombard. MPD reported that Lasky then tested Tallulah Bankhead, Ina Claire, Zita Johann and Sally Eilers before selecting Benita Hume. HR news items also stated that John Boles was scheduled to replace Harvey Stephens, and that Torben Meyer, John Trent and Theresa Harris were to be included in the cast. A FD news item noted that Edgar Norton was signed to play the valet; however, he does not appear in the film. The Twentieth Century-Fox Records of the Legal Department at the UCLA Theater Arts Library give the following information about the production: Fox had to obtain permission to use the title from Universal, to whom it was registered; Samuel N. Behrman prepared a continuity that was not used; and Ernest Palmer's credit as co-photographer was eliminated from the film's credits. The reason why Palmer's credit was removed has not been determined. Letters in the MPAA/PCA Collection at the AMPAS Library indicate that the Hays Office strongly objected to the implication that the character of "Peggy Vane" had "an affair with him [John Strong] in the school chapel." This "one bad sex situation" had to be toned down before the Hays Office would approve the film's ... More Less

Var reported that producer Jesse L. Lasky first attempted to borrow Jean Harlow from M-G-M for the lead, and then Claudette Colbert from Paramount when M-G-M turned down his request. According to HR and FD news items, Myrna Loy was signed to play "Peggy Vane," and when she was forced to relinquish the role due to poor health, she was to be replaced by Carole Lombard. MPD reported that Lasky then tested Tallulah Bankhead, Ina Claire, Zita Johann and Sally Eilers before selecting Benita Hume. HR news items also stated that John Boles was scheduled to replace Harvey Stephens, and that Torben Meyer, John Trent and Theresa Harris were to be included in the cast. A FD news item noted that Edgar Norton was signed to play the valet; however, he does not appear in the film. The Twentieth Century-Fox Records of the Legal Department at the UCLA Theater Arts Library give the following information about the production: Fox had to obtain permission to use the title from Universal, to whom it was registered; Samuel N. Behrman prepared a continuity that was not used; and Ernest Palmer's credit as co-photographer was eliminated from the film's credits. The reason why Palmer's credit was removed has not been determined. Letters in the MPAA/PCA Collection at the AMPAS Library indicate that the Hays Office strongly objected to the implication that the character of "Peggy Vane" had "an affair with him [John Strong] in the school chapel." This "one bad sex situation" had to be toned down before the Hays Office would approve the film's script. The Worst Woman in Paris? was banned by the Legion of Decency in 1934. More Less

BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
4 Oct 33
p. 3.
Film Daily
20 Jun 33
p. 6.
Film Daily
6 Jul 33
p. 10.
Film Daily
10 Jul 33
p. 2.
Film Daily
13 Jul 33
p. 24.
Film Daily
25 Jul 33
p. 8.
Film Daily
25 Nov 33
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
27 May 33
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
19 Jun 33
p. 1.
Hollywood Reporter
1 Jul 33
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
6 Jul 33
p. 1.
International Photographer
1 Aug 33
p. 34.
Motion Picture Daily
11 Jul 33
p. 39.
Motion Picture Herald
22 Jul 33
p. 20, 25
Motion Picture Herald
14 Oct 33
p. 34.
New York Times
25 Nov 33
p. 10.
Variety
28 Mar 33
p. 28.
Variety
28 Nov 33
p. 20.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
WRITERS
Adpt
Adpt
PHOTOGRAPHY
Photog
Cam op
Asst cam
Asst cam
ART DIRECTOR
Settings
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
COSTUMES
Gowns
MUSIC
PRODUCTION MISC
Still photog
SOURCES
SONGS
"Love Passes Me By," music by Arthur Lange, lyrics Robert Burkhardt.
DETAILS
Release Date:
20 October 1933
Copyright Claimant:
Fox Film Corp.
Copyright Date:
20 October 1933
Copyright Number:
LP4204
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Noiseless Recording
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
75 or 78
Length(in feet):
6,840
Length(in reels):
8
Country:
United States
SYNOPSIS

Beautiful Englishwoman Peggy Vane tires of being gossiped about in Paris, where scandalmongers have labeled her "the worst woman in Paris" because of her numerous suitors. Her constant companion is the wealthy and jaded Adolphe Ballou, who is known as "the best-dressed man in Paris." The two sophisticates grow weary of their daily routine and assume that they are bored with each other. They agree to part company, and after Adolphe promises her that he will always stand by her if she needs him, Peggy goes to America with her maid Jeanine. In Bridgetown, Kansas, the train Peggy and Jeanine are on is involved in a wreck, and inspired by the courage of John Strong as he rescues trapped passengers, Peggy saves a baby and is injured in the process. While Bridgetown citizens are acclaiming her heroism, Peggy convalesces in the home of John and his mother, who are the kind of simple people Peggy once admired but now regards as amusing. As the days pass, Peggy loses her veneer of over-sophistication and grows to respect Mrs. Strong and John, who is the headmaster of a boys school. Although John is blind to it, Peggy notices that his loyal secretary, Mary Dunbar, is in love with him. John is awestruck by Peggy's glamor, however, and his sweet attentions begin to wear down her resistance. She encourages him to accept the job of president of the state university, which he had intended to turn down despite Mary's insistence that he could handle the job. Believing that moving to a bigger city will entice Peggy to stay with him, he accepts ... +


Beautiful Englishwoman Peggy Vane tires of being gossiped about in Paris, where scandalmongers have labeled her "the worst woman in Paris" because of her numerous suitors. Her constant companion is the wealthy and jaded Adolphe Ballou, who is known as "the best-dressed man in Paris." The two sophisticates grow weary of their daily routine and assume that they are bored with each other. They agree to part company, and after Adolphe promises her that he will always stand by her if she needs him, Peggy goes to America with her maid Jeanine. In Bridgetown, Kansas, the train Peggy and Jeanine are on is involved in a wreck, and inspired by the courage of John Strong as he rescues trapped passengers, Peggy saves a baby and is injured in the process. While Bridgetown citizens are acclaiming her heroism, Peggy convalesces in the home of John and his mother, who are the kind of simple people Peggy once admired but now regards as amusing. As the days pass, Peggy loses her veneer of over-sophistication and grows to respect Mrs. Strong and John, who is the headmaster of a boys school. Although John is blind to it, Peggy notices that his loyal secretary, Mary Dunbar, is in love with him. John is awestruck by Peggy's glamor, however, and his sweet attentions begin to wear down her resistance. She encourages him to accept the job of president of the state university, which he had intended to turn down despite Mary's insistence that he could handle the job. Believing that moving to a bigger city will entice Peggy to stay with him, he accepts the position and dreams of marrying her. Peggy has similar dreams but soon realizes that her reputation will ruin John's career. The night after Peggy makes up her mind to leave, Jeanine shows her a Paris newspaper article about Adolphe, who has lost his fortune and is now a clerk in the company he once owned. When John asks her to marry him, Peggy tells him that she cannot because she must return to the man who gave her everything. John is crushed by Peggy's pretense of coldness and goes to the school, where he tells Mary that he will not be taking the university job. Caring only for John's welfare, Mary begs Peggy to help him, and Peggy, impressed by the depth of Mary's love, goes to see John. She confesses that she loves him and asks him to make their goodbye something wonderful. The next morning, Mrs. Strong tells Mary that she is worried about John, for he did not come home the night before, and about Peggy, who did not return until very late. The mayor arrives to thank Peggy for rescuing the child, after which Peggy bids a bittersweet farewell to Mrs. Strong and Mary and returns to Paris. There she finds Adolphe and gives him her jewels to pay off his debts. Realizing that they belong together, the couple are married and learn to ignore the gossips who insist that Peggy only returned to Adolphe to help him spend his regained fortune. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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