Our Relations (1936)

72 or 74 mins | Comedy | 30 October 1936

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HISTORY

The working title of this film was The Money Box. Although HR production charts include Wade Boteler, Jerry Mandy and Harry Bowen in the cast, their participation in the completed film has not been confirmed. According to HR news items, the picture was shown to King Edward VII of Great Britain at a special command performance, and to President Franklin D. Roosevelt while he was sailing to South America on a goodwill tour. According to modern sources, Harrington Reynolds, Clarence Hennecke and Mauri Grashin, as well as Stan Laurel, worked on the screenplay. Modern sources include the following actors in the cast: James Kilgannon (Other drunk); Charlie Hall (Pawnshop extra); Art Rowlands and Harry Wilson (Seamen); Nick Copeland (Bartender); Alex Pollard (Waiter); Billy Engle (Wharf tough); and Bob Finlayson, Alex Finlayson, Foxy Hall, Jay Eaton, Jack Hill, Rita Dunn, Alice Cooke, Jack Egan, Bunny Bronson, Marvel Andre, Dick Gilbert, Jack Cooper, Jerry Breslin, Bill Madsen, Ernie Alexander, Tony Campenero, Polly Chase, Jay Belasco, Gertrude Astor, Buddy Messinger, Gertrude Messinger, David Sharpe, Rose Langdon, Johnny Arthur, Kay McCoy, Mrs. Jack W. Burns, Rheba Campbell, Margo Sage , Ed Parker, Leo Sulky, Marvin Hatley, Sam Lufkin, Barney O'Toole, Ray Cooke, Art Miles, Crete Sipple, Dick French and Rosemary Theby (Extras in Denker's Beer Garden and Pirate Nightclub). According to modern sources, the role of Judge Polk was originally slated for Richard Carle, and the role of the bailiff was played by Fred Holmes instead of Harry Bernard, who is listed by the Call Bureau Cast Service as playing the part. ...

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The working title of this film was The Money Box. Although HR production charts include Wade Boteler, Jerry Mandy and Harry Bowen in the cast, their participation in the completed film has not been confirmed. According to HR news items, the picture was shown to King Edward VII of Great Britain at a special command performance, and to President Franklin D. Roosevelt while he was sailing to South America on a goodwill tour. According to modern sources, Harrington Reynolds, Clarence Hennecke and Mauri Grashin, as well as Stan Laurel, worked on the screenplay. Modern sources include the following actors in the cast: James Kilgannon (Other drunk); Charlie Hall (Pawnshop extra); Art Rowlands and Harry Wilson (Seamen); Nick Copeland (Bartender); Alex Pollard (Waiter); Billy Engle (Wharf tough); and Bob Finlayson, Alex Finlayson, Foxy Hall, Jay Eaton, Jack Hill, Rita Dunn, Alice Cooke, Jack Egan, Bunny Bronson, Marvel Andre, Dick Gilbert, Jack Cooper, Jerry Breslin, Bill Madsen, Ernie Alexander, Tony Campenero, Polly Chase, Jay Belasco, Gertrude Astor, Buddy Messinger, Gertrude Messinger, David Sharpe, Rose Langdon, Johnny Arthur, Kay McCoy, Mrs. Jack W. Burns, Rheba Campbell, Margo Sage , Ed Parker, Leo Sulky, Marvin Hatley, Sam Lufkin, Barney O'Toole, Ray Cooke, Art Miles, Crete Sipple, Dick French and Rosemary Theby (Extras in Denker's Beer Garden and Pirate Nightclub). According to modern sources, the role of Judge Polk was originally slated for Richard Carle, and the role of the bailiff was played by Fred Holmes instead of Harry Bernard, who is listed by the Call Bureau Cast Service as playing the part. For additional information about Laurel and Hardy's career together, please See Entry for Pardon Us.

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PERSONAL & COMPANY INDEX CREDITS
CREDIT
HISTORY CREDITS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
18-Jul-36
---
Daily Variety
10 Jul 1936
p. 3
Film Daily
14 Jul 1936
p. 11
Hollywood Reporter
16 Mar 1936
p. 10
Hollywood Reporter
4 May 1936
p. 24
Hollywood Reporter
10 Jul 1936
p. 3
Hollywood Reporter
8 Oct 1936
p. 19
Hollywood Reporter
17 Nov 1936
p. 2
Motion Picture Daily
11 Jul 1936
p. 2
Motion Picture Herald
21 Nov 1936
pp. 54-55
New York Times
11 Nov 1936
p. 55
Variety
18 Nov 1936
p. 13
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
A Stan Laurel Production
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTOR
PRODUCER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Photog
ART DIRECTORS
Settings
W. L. Stevens
Settings
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
MUSIC
Mus score and dir
SOUND
VISUAL EFFECTS
Photog eff
STAND INS
Doubles
Doubles
Doubles
Doubles
SOURCES
LITERARY
Suggested by the short story "The Money Box" by William Wymark Jacobs in Snug Harbor (New York, 1931).
LITERARY SOURCE AUTHOR
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
The Money Box
Release Date:
30 October 1936
Production Date:
16 Mar--early May 1936
Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Corp.
29 September 1936
LP6695
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Sound System
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
72 or 74
Length(in feet):
6,620
Length(in reels):
8
Country:
United States
PCA No:
2128
Passed by NBR:
Yes
SYNOPSIS

Oliver Hardy receives a letter from his mother that contains a photo of himself and his twin brother Bert, his friend, Stan Laurel, and Stan's twin brother Alf. The boys have not seen their twins in years, and Ollie's mother states that they went to sea and were hanged for mutiny. Ashamed to be related to such scoundrels, Stan and Ollie burn the photo and vow never to tell their wives, Daphne and Betty, about their brothers. That afternoon, however, the S.S. Periwinkle docks, and Alf and Bert prepare for shore leave. The ship's chief engineer, Finn, tricks them out of their money, and they are then summoned by the ship's captain, who tells them to get a package he is expecting and bring it to Denker's Beer Garden. The boys get the package and go to Denker's, where they meet two gold diggers, Lily and Alice, who set their sights on the pearl ring the boys are holding for the captain. The girls order expensive dinners for which Alf and Bert cannot pay. As security, Alf and Bert leave the captain's ring with the waiter, Joe Groagan, and rush to the boardinghouse where Finn is staying to retrieve their money. Finn refuses to give the money back and eventually tricks them again, leaving them trapped in the boardinghouse without any clothes. Meanwhile, Stan and Ollie go with their wives to Denker's to eat. Lily, Alice and Groagan, unaware that Stan and Ollie are not the men they met earlier, create all kinds of havoc for them. Finally, after paying Alf and Bert's bill, receiving the pearl ...

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Oliver Hardy receives a letter from his mother that contains a photo of himself and his twin brother Bert, his friend, Stan Laurel, and Stan's twin brother Alf. The boys have not seen their twins in years, and Ollie's mother states that they went to sea and were hanged for mutiny. Ashamed to be related to such scoundrels, Stan and Ollie burn the photo and vow never to tell their wives, Daphne and Betty, about their brothers. That afternoon, however, the S.S. Periwinkle docks, and Alf and Bert prepare for shore leave. The ship's chief engineer, Finn, tricks them out of their money, and they are then summoned by the ship's captain, who tells them to get a package he is expecting and bring it to Denker's Beer Garden. The boys get the package and go to Denker's, where they meet two gold diggers, Lily and Alice, who set their sights on the pearl ring the boys are holding for the captain. The girls order expensive dinners for which Alf and Bert cannot pay. As security, Alf and Bert leave the captain's ring with the waiter, Joe Groagan, and rush to the boardinghouse where Finn is staying to retrieve their money. Finn refuses to give the money back and eventually tricks them again, leaving them trapped in the boardinghouse without any clothes. Meanwhile, Stan and Ollie go with their wives to Denker's to eat. Lily, Alice and Groagan, unaware that Stan and Ollie are not the men they met earlier, create all kinds of havoc for them. Finally, after paying Alf and Bert's bill, receiving the pearl ring in exchange for their cash and trying to placate their jealous wives, Stan and Ollie are done in by Finn, who mistakes them for Alf and Bert and their wives for Lily and Alice. After their wives storm out, Stan and Ollie join a congenial drunk and drown their sorrows. Back at the boardinghouse, Alf and Bert decide to find the captain and so, wrapped in quilts, they return to Denker's. Groagan and the bartender fight with them when they ask for the ring, and when the police take them away, they are mistaken for Stan and Ollie by Mrs. Addlequist, a friend of Daphne and Betty's. At the courtroom, other prisoners tell Alf and Bert that Daphne and Betty are social workers, while the wives plead with Judge Polk to release the boys. Alf and Bert are then united with "their" wives and they all go to a nightclub. Stan and Ollie are already there, and the chaos begins when Alice and Lily show up as well. The captain finds Stan and Ollie at the bar and asks them for his ring. Two gangsters overhear their conversation and see Ollie accidentally put the ring in Alf's pocket. The captain takes off in pursuit of Alf, and when Stan returns to Ollie, he and Ollie are kidnapped by the gangsters. Finn and some toughs join in the chase of Alf and Bert, and after demolishing the nightclub, they all go to the waterfront, where the gangsters have put Stan and Ollie's feet in cement. After accidentally knocking the gangsters into the water, the boys fall in themselves. Alf and Bert appear and, after returning the captain's ring, rescue their long-lost brothers. They realize that the day's mishaps are the result of mistaken identities, and all ends well until Bert and Ollie, complaining to one another about "those dumb Laurels," do not watch where they are going and fall off the pier.

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Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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