Fascinating Youth (1926)

Drama | 23 August 1926

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HISTORY

The film’s cast featured the 1926 graduating class of the first Paramount School for Stars, known as the Junior Stars of 1926. Principal photography began on 9 November 1926 at Famous Players-Lasky Corp.’s studio in the Astoria neighborhood of Queens in New York City. Exteriors were shot at Lake Placid, NY, according to the 23 January 1926 Exhibitors Herald.
       The film was initially untitled; an item in the 21 November 1925 Motion Picture News announced a contest for title ideas, with a prize of $25 to be awarded to the winning entry. Shortly after, the 5 December 1925 Motion Picture News referred to the picture by its new, tentative title, Glorious Youth, and noted that the sixteen Junior Stars were poised to receive five-year contracts worth $76,050 if their work on this film was deemed satisfactory. Prior to the pictures’s general release on 23 August 1926, a review in the 14 March 1926 Film Daily identified Charles “Buddy” Rogers and Ivy Harris as the standouts of the young cast.
       According to the 26 December 1925 Motion Picture News, actress Julia Hurley appeared in the film. The 77-year-old Hurley was said to be “the oldest living actress.”
       The National Film Preservation Board (NFPB) included this picture on its list of Lost U.S. Silent Feature Films as of February 2021. ...

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The film’s cast featured the 1926 graduating class of the first Paramount School for Stars, known as the Junior Stars of 1926. Principal photography began on 9 November 1926 at Famous Players-Lasky Corp.’s studio in the Astoria neighborhood of Queens in New York City. Exteriors were shot at Lake Placid, NY, according to the 23 January 1926 Exhibitors Herald.
       The film was initially untitled; an item in the 21 November 1925 Motion Picture News announced a contest for title ideas, with a prize of $25 to be awarded to the winning entry. Shortly after, the 5 December 1925 Motion Picture News referred to the picture by its new, tentative title, Glorious Youth, and noted that the sixteen Junior Stars were poised to receive five-year contracts worth $76,050 if their work on this film was deemed satisfactory. Prior to the pictures’s general release on 23 August 1926, a review in the 14 March 1926 Film Daily identified Charles “Buddy” Rogers and Ivy Harris as the standouts of the young cast.
       According to the 26 December 1925 Motion Picture News, actress Julia Hurley appeared in the film. The 77-year-old Hurley was said to be “the oldest living actress.”
       The National Film Preservation Board (NFPB) included this picture on its list of Lost U.S. Silent Feature Films as of February 2021.

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GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Exhibitors Herald
23 Jan 1926
p. 53
Film Daily
7 Mar 1926
---
Film Daily
14 Mar 1926
p. 6
Motion Picture
Jun 1926
p. 66, 115
Motion Picture News
7 Nov 1925
p. 2151
Motion Picture News
21 Nov 1925
p. 2446
Motion Picture News
5 Dec 1925
p. 2641
Motion Picture News
26 Dec 1925
p. 3158
New York Times
3 Mar 1926
p. 26
New York Times
9 May 1926
---
New York Times
10 May 1926
p. 19
Variety
17 Mar 1926
p. 39
DETAILS
Release Date:
23 August 1926
Premiere Information:
New York special showing: 2 Mar 1926; New York opening: week of 9 May 1926
Production Date:
9 Nov 1925--Jan or Feb 1926
Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Famous Players-Lasky Corp.
23 August 1926
LP23043
Physical Properties:
Silent
Black and White
Length(in feet):
6,882
Length(in reels):
7
Country:
United States
Language:
English
SYNOPSIS

Teddy Ward, son of a wealthy hotel owner, falls in love with Jeanne King, a Greenwich Village sketch artist, though his father favors a match with Loris Lane, a society girl. On the condition that he is successful in reviving business at his father's mountain resort, he may, however, marry the girl of his choice. With the aid of his friends, Teddy launches an advertising stunt involving an iceboat contest, but the plan is opposed by his father; then, in desperation, he invites a group of movie stars to the hotel. When the stars plead previous engagements, his friends try to help by disguising themselves as stars, but Jeanne, who has been sketching at a studio, arrives with half a dozen famous actors. Although Teddy's father has refused to pay the prize money, the iceboat race takes place; and Teddy is forced to race against Slade, a champion, and win his own race to save face. Mr. Ward forgives him and announces his approval of ...

More Less

Teddy Ward, son of a wealthy hotel owner, falls in love with Jeanne King, a Greenwich Village sketch artist, though his father favors a match with Loris Lane, a society girl. On the condition that he is successful in reviving business at his father's mountain resort, he may, however, marry the girl of his choice. With the aid of his friends, Teddy launches an advertising stunt involving an iceboat contest, but the plan is opposed by his father; then, in desperation, he invites a group of movie stars to the hotel. When the stars plead previous engagements, his friends try to help by disguising themselves as stars, but Jeanne, who has been sketching at a studio, arrives with half a dozen famous actors. Although Teddy's father has refused to pay the prize money, the iceboat race takes place; and Teddy is forced to race against Slade, a champion, and win his own race to save face. Mr. Ward forgives him and announces his approval of Jeanne.

Less

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.