Glorifying the American Girl (1929)

96 mins | Musical | 7 December 1929

Full page view
HISTORY

The 13 May 1926 Motion Picture News reported that Edward Sutherland was ready to begin Glorifying the American Girl on 17 May 1926, starring Louise Brooks. Joseph Urban was assigned the job of art direction, and Florenz Ziegfeld would supervise. However, the project was not begun at that time.
       The 2 Jan 1927 FD announced that Argentinian H. D'Abbadie D'Arrast was set to start directing Glorifying the American Girl for Famous Lasky Corp. on 1 Feb 1927. Fay Wray was already cast to star. However, neither D'Arrast nor Wray was involved in the final production.
       A silent version of the film was also released, at a length of 6,786 ft. ...

More Less

The 13 May 1926 Motion Picture News reported that Edward Sutherland was ready to begin Glorifying the American Girl on 17 May 1926, starring Louise Brooks. Joseph Urban was assigned the job of art direction, and Florenz Ziegfeld would supervise. However, the project was not begun at that time.
       The 2 Jan 1927 FD announced that Argentinian H. D'Abbadie D'Arrast was set to start directing Glorifying the American Girl for Famous Lasky Corp. on 1 Feb 1927. Fay Wray was already cast to star. However, neither D'Arrast nor Wray was involved in the final production.
       A silent version of the film was also released, at a length of 6,786 ft.

Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Film Daily
2 Jan 1927
p. 6
Motion Picture News
13 May 1926
p. 2348
New York Times
11 Jan 1930
p. 21
Variety
15 Jan 1930
p. 22
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Revue dir
PRODUCER
WRITERS
Joseph Patrick McEvoy
Story
Story
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
MUSIC
Mus dir
DANCE
Ballet ensembles
SOURCES
SONGS
"Blue Skies," words and music by Irving Berlin; "I'm Just a Vagabond Lover," words and music by Rudy Vallee and Leon Zimmerman; "What Wouldn't I Do for That Man," words by E. Y. Harburg, music by Jay Gorney. "At Sundown" and "Beautiful Changes," words and music by Walter Donaldson. Walter Donaldson.
SONGWRITERS/COMPOSERS
+
DETAILS
Release Date:
7 December 1929
Production Date:

Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Paramount Famous Lasky Corp.
7 December 1929
LP905
Physical Properties:
Black & white with color sequences
Technicolor
Sound, also silent
Movietone
Duration(in mins):
96
Length(in feet):
8,071
Length(in reels):
9-10
Country:
United States
Language:
English
SYNOPSIS

As a child, Gloria Hughes cherishes the ambition of becoming a Ziegfeld revue girl, and at 17 she sings in the music department of a store where Buddy, who loves her, accompanies her on the piano. At the annual company picnic, Buddy takes her canoeing and proposes, but she rejects him, saying the stage is her greatest love. When the Miller-Mooney dancing act falls apart as the result of a quarrel, Miller takes on Gloria as his partner. In New York he makes objectionable advances, but she does obtain a Ziegfeld contract. Barbara, who loves Buddy, comes with him to see Gloria, and when Barbara is injured in a street accident, Buddy realizes that he loves her. At Gloria's debut, many celebrities are introduced. The show opens with Rudy Vallee and his orchestra, followed by a blues song from Helen Morgan, and Eddie Cantor does his "Cheap Charlie" skit; then Gloria appears as the premiere danseuse and is a sensation. Her triumph is lessened by news of Buddy and Barbara's marriage, but she finds contentment in the ...

More Less

As a child, Gloria Hughes cherishes the ambition of becoming a Ziegfeld revue girl, and at 17 she sings in the music department of a store where Buddy, who loves her, accompanies her on the piano. At the annual company picnic, Buddy takes her canoeing and proposes, but she rejects him, saying the stage is her greatest love. When the Miller-Mooney dancing act falls apart as the result of a quarrel, Miller takes on Gloria as his partner. In New York he makes objectionable advances, but she does obtain a Ziegfeld contract. Barbara, who loves Buddy, comes with him to see Gloria, and when Barbara is injured in a street accident, Buddy realizes that he loves her. At Gloria's debut, many celebrities are introduced. The show opens with Rudy Vallee and his orchestra, followed by a blues song from Helen Morgan, and Eddie Cantor does his "Cheap Charlie" skit; then Gloria appears as the premiere danseuse and is a sensation. Her triumph is lessened by news of Buddy and Barbara's marriage, but she finds contentment in the applause.

Less

GENRE
Genre:
Sub-genre:
Show business


Subject

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

TOP SEARCHES

Human Desire

The working title of this film was The Human Beast . A Sep 1950 HR news item reveals that producers Jerry Wald and Norman Krasna originally ... >>

Westward the Women

The film's pre-release title was Pioneer Women . The opening credits list Robert Taylor and Denise Darcel first, with several other cast members listed after them. ... >>

Top Hat

Because the film script used very little from the Aladar Laszlo-Alexander Faragó play, RKO chose not to give screen credit to the playwrights. However, in reviews and other ... >>

Watermelon Man

The film was originally titled The Night the Sun Came Out on Happy Hollow Lane, which was later shortened to The Night the Sun Came Out. ... >>

The Covered Wagon

Two title cards introduce the story: “The blood of America is the blood of pioneers—the blood of lion-hearted men and women who carved a splendid civilization out of an ... >>

The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.