Good News (1930)

78 mins | Musical comedy | 23 August 1930

Writer:

Frances Marion

Cinematographer:

Percy Hilburn

Production Designer:

Cedric Gibbons

Production Company:

Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Corp.
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HISTORY

Mary Lawlor’s casting as “Connie” was announced in the 4 December 1929 Variety, which noted that Lawlor had played the same role in the Broadway debut of the 1927 musical, Good News, on which this film was based. Gus Shy also reprised the role of “Bobby.”
       The 1 January 1930 Variety stated that Notre Dame football coach and former All-American football player Knute Rockne was hired to serve as technical director of football sequences. Later that month, the 25 January 1930 Inside Facts of Stage and Screen listed Billy Reynolds, Irene Snow, Eva Hoffman, and Patsy Lee as cast members and stated that Edgar J. MacGregor and Albert Kelly were set to direct. However, the 28 January 1930 Film Daily identified Nick Grinde as MacGregor’s co-director.
       Principal photography began in early February 1930 at Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Corp.’s (M-G-M) studio in Culver City, CA, according to the 8 February 1930 Hollywood Filmograph. Days later, the 12 February 1930 Exhibitors Daily Review and Motion Pictures Today noted that May Moylan (likely Catherine [May] Moylan, former Ziegfeld Follies dancer) had joined the cast. Filming was finished by early April 1930, according to the 9 April 1930 Film Daily.
       Theatrical release took place on 23 August 1930. Modern sources, including a 30 May 2016 AV Club article, note that the film’s ending contained a Technicolor dance sequence, but that reel was lost. Extant footage is in black-and-white.
       M-G-M produced another adaptation of the musical in 1947. Also entitled Good News, that film was directed by Charles Walters and starred June ...

More Less

Mary Lawlor’s casting as “Connie” was announced in the 4 December 1929 Variety, which noted that Lawlor had played the same role in the Broadway debut of the 1927 musical, Good News, on which this film was based. Gus Shy also reprised the role of “Bobby.”
       The 1 January 1930 Variety stated that Notre Dame football coach and former All-American football player Knute Rockne was hired to serve as technical director of football sequences. Later that month, the 25 January 1930 Inside Facts of Stage and Screen listed Billy Reynolds, Irene Snow, Eva Hoffman, and Patsy Lee as cast members and stated that Edgar J. MacGregor and Albert Kelly were set to direct. However, the 28 January 1930 Film Daily identified Nick Grinde as MacGregor’s co-director.
       Principal photography began in early February 1930 at Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Corp.’s (M-G-M) studio in Culver City, CA, according to the 8 February 1930 Hollywood Filmograph. Days later, the 12 February 1930 Exhibitors Daily Review and Motion Pictures Today noted that May Moylan (likely Catherine [May] Moylan, former Ziegfeld Follies dancer) had joined the cast. Filming was finished by early April 1930, according to the 9 April 1930 Film Daily.
       Theatrical release took place on 23 August 1930. Modern sources, including a 30 May 2016 AV Club article, note that the film’s ending contained a Technicolor dance sequence, but that reel was lost. Extant footage is in black-and-white.
       M-G-M produced another adaptation of the musical in 1947. Also entitled Good News, that film was directed by Charles Walters and starred June Allyson and Peter Lawford (see entry).

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GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
AV Club
30 May 2016
---
Exhibitors Daily Review and Motion Pictures Today
12 Feb 1930
p. 4
Film Daily
28 Jan 1930
p. 7
Film Daily
9 Apr 1930
p. 5
Film Daily
22 May 1930
p. 11
Film Daily
9 Sep 1930
---
Hollywood Filmograph
8 Feb 1930
p. 13
Hollywood Filmograph
1 Mar 1930
p. 2
Inside Facts of Stage and Screen
25 Jan 1930
p. 11, 13
New York Times
6 Sep 1930
p. 9
Variety
4 Dec 1929
p. 51
Variety
1 Jan 1930
p. 6, 48
Variety
10 Sep 1930
p. 17
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
WRITERS
Joe Farnham
Dial
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
COSTUMES
Ward
MUSIC
Interpolations
Interpolations
Interpolations
Interpolations
SOUND
Rec eng
Rec eng
DANCE
Dance dir
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the musical Good News by Lawrence Schwab, Lew Brown, Frank Mandel, B. G. DeSylva and Ray Henderson (New York, 6 Sep 1927).
LITERARY SOURCE AUTHORS
+
SONGS
"He's a Ladies Man," "The Best Things in Life Are Free," "The Varsity Drag," "Good News," "Tait Song" and "Students Are We," words and music by Buddy DeSylva, Lew Brown and Ray Henderson; "If You're Not Kissing Me" and "Football," words by Arthur Freed, music by Nacio Herb Brown; "I Feel Pessimistic," words by George Waggner, music by J. Russel Robinson; "Gee, But I'd Like To Make You Happy," words and music by Larry Shay, George Ward and Reggie Montgomery.
SONGWRITERS/COMPOSERS
+
DETAILS
Release Date:
23 August 1930
Premiere Information:
New York opening: week of 5 Sep 1930
Production Date:
early Feb--early Apr 1930
Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Distributing Corp.
25 August 1930
LP1506
Physical Properties:
Sound
Movietone
Black & white with color sequences
Duration(in mins):
78
Length(in feet):
8,100
Length(in reels):
11
Country:
United States
Language:
English
SYNOPSIS

Among the students at Tait College are football star Tom Marlowe, whose neglect of studies threatens the chances of the school team; Bobby, a wise-cracking freshman, who makes a play for the school vamp, Babe, and wins her; and Connie, who falls for Tom. Although they all prefer the Varsity Drag to studying, Tom is finally reinstated with the help of Professor Kenyon. He wins the climactic game as well as the love of ...

More Less

Among the students at Tait College are football star Tom Marlowe, whose neglect of studies threatens the chances of the school team; Bobby, a wise-cracking freshman, who makes a play for the school vamp, Babe, and wins her; and Connie, who falls for Tom. Although they all prefer the Varsity Drag to studying, Tom is finally reinstated with the help of Professor Kenyon. He wins the climactic game as well as the love of Connie.

Less

GENRE


Subject

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.