Just Tony (1922)

Western | 20 August 1922

Director:

Lynn F. Reynolds

Cinematographer:

Dan Clark

Production Company:

Fox Film Corp.
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HISTORY

Tom Mix was a real cowboy with a background of ranching, rodeo riding, and stunt work. In 1914, his wife, Olive, saw a colt being pulled behind a wagon on what is now Glendale Boulevard in Los Angeles, CA, and telephoned horse trainer-actor Pat Chrisman, according to Robert S. Birchard in his book King Cowboy: Tom Mix and the Movies (1993). Chrisman, a regular in Tom Mix movies, paid $14 for the colt. Three years later, Chrisman sold the trained horse, named Tony, to Tom Mix for $600. By 1922, “Tony, the Wonder Horse” was almost as popular as Mix himself.
       According to the 7 Oct 1922 Exhibitors Herald, Just Tony went into general release 9 Sep 1922, but it had opened a month earlier at the Strand Theatre on Broadway in New York City, the 7 Aug 1922 FD noted. Reviews were good, and the 20 Aug 1922 FD heaped praise on the nominal star: “Tony has long been a familiar and important figure in the Tom Mix features, but this time he goes it alone, acquitting himself capable at all times.” The Oct 1922 issue of Photodramatist referred to Tony as “a noble animal, with more essential drama in his flanks than Betty Blythe [a current screen siren] ever possessed.” And the 11 Aug 1922 Var raved, “How they ever kept a camera near the rough and tumble is hard to figure out.”
       The 14 Oct 1922 Exhibitors Herald announced that Tony, who “performed with almost human intelligence” in the Fox production, Just Tony, has been insured for ...

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Tom Mix was a real cowboy with a background of ranching, rodeo riding, and stunt work. In 1914, his wife, Olive, saw a colt being pulled behind a wagon on what is now Glendale Boulevard in Los Angeles, CA, and telephoned horse trainer-actor Pat Chrisman, according to Robert S. Birchard in his book King Cowboy: Tom Mix and the Movies (1993). Chrisman, a regular in Tom Mix movies, paid $14 for the colt. Three years later, Chrisman sold the trained horse, named Tony, to Tom Mix for $600. By 1922, “Tony, the Wonder Horse” was almost as popular as Mix himself.
       According to the 7 Oct 1922 Exhibitors Herald, Just Tony went into general release 9 Sep 1922, but it had opened a month earlier at the Strand Theatre on Broadway in New York City, the 7 Aug 1922 FD noted. Reviews were good, and the 20 Aug 1922 FD heaped praise on the nominal star: “Tony has long been a familiar and important figure in the Tom Mix features, but this time he goes it alone, acquitting himself capable at all times.” The Oct 1922 issue of Photodramatist referred to Tony as “a noble animal, with more essential drama in his flanks than Betty Blythe [a current screen siren] ever possessed.” And the 11 Aug 1922 Var raved, “How they ever kept a camera near the rough and tumble is hard to figure out.”
       The 14 Oct 1922 Exhibitors Herald announced that Tony, who “performed with almost human intelligence” in the Fox production, Just Tony, has been insured for $500,000. However, a full-page profile on Tony in the Mar 1923 Motion Picture Magazine put the number much lower, at $20,000. The article stated that Tony had already received hundreds of letters from fans, along with blankets and boxes of sugar cubes. He also had his own transportation, a specially made Packard truck.

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SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Exhibitors Herald
7 Oct 1922
p. 59
Exhibitors Herald
14 Oct 1922
p. 62
Film Daily
7 Aug 1922
p. 4
Film Daily
20 Aug 1922
---
Motion Picture Magazine
Mar 1923
p. 28
New York Times
7 Aug 1922
p. 14
Photodramatist
Oct 1922
p. 13, 14
Variety
11 Aug 1922
p. 32
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTOR
PRODUCER
WRITER
Scenario
PHOTOGRAPHY
Photog
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the novel Alcatraz by Max Brand (New York, 1923).
LITERARY SOURCE AUTHOR
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
Alcatraz
Release Date:
20 August 1922
Premiere Information:
New York opening: early Aug 1922; General release: 9 Sep 1922
Production Date:

Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Fox Film Corp.
20 August 1922
LP19089
Physical Properties:
Silent
Black and White
Length(in feet):
5,233
Length(in reels):
5
Country:
United States
Language:
English
SYNOPSIS

Marianne Jordan hires cowboy Jim "Red" Ferris to capture a wild mustang that has been luring her father's horses from the ranch into his herd. The mustang has already killed the man who whipped it, and now seeks revenge against those who mistreated it, including Lew Hervey, foreman of the Jordan Ranch, who has secretly been rustling the horses. After Ferris saves the horse from being badly beaten, it shows its appreciation by rescuing Red and Marianne Jordan when Hervey and another rustler try to kill ...

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Marianne Jordan hires cowboy Jim "Red" Ferris to capture a wild mustang that has been luring her father's horses from the ranch into his herd. The mustang has already killed the man who whipped it, and now seeks revenge against those who mistreated it, including Lew Hervey, foreman of the Jordan Ranch, who has secretly been rustling the horses. After Ferris saves the horse from being badly beaten, it shows its appreciation by rescuing Red and Marianne Jordan when Hervey and another rustler try to kill them.

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Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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