Ladies of Leisure (1930)

102 mins | Melodrama | 5 April 1930

Director:

Frank Capra

Producer:

Harry Cohn

Cinematographer:

Joe Walker

Editor:

Maurice Wright

Production Designer:

Harrison Wiley

Production Company:

Columbia Pictures Corp.
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HISTORY

According to contemporary sources, the working title was Ladies of the Evening. Modern sources indicate that Edward Bernds was the sound mixing engineer, and note that the film was shot at the Columbia studios and on location at Malibu Lake, CA, from Dec 1929 to Jan 1930. A silent version was reportedly released for theaters not yet equipped with sound. Columbia remade the film in 1937 as Women of Glamour, directed by Gordon Wiles and starring Virginia Bruce. A 1926 Columbia film also titled Ladies of Leisure was unrelated to the 1930 ... More Less

According to contemporary sources, the working title was Ladies of the Evening. Modern sources indicate that Edward Bernds was the sound mixing engineer, and note that the film was shot at the Columbia studios and on location at Malibu Lake, CA, from Dec 1929 to Jan 1930. A silent version was reportedly released for theaters not yet equipped with sound. Columbia remade the film in 1937 as Women of Glamour, directed by Gordon Wiles and starring Virginia Bruce. A 1926 Columbia film also titled Ladies of Leisure was unrelated to the 1930 film. More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Chicago Tribune
13 Apr 1930
p. F5.
Exhibitors Herald World
28 May 1930
p. 35.
Film Daily
13 Apr 1930
p. 10.
Los Angeles Times
4 Apr 1930
p. A9.
New York Times
24 May 1930
p. 21.
New Yorker
31 May 1930
p. 61.
Variety
28 May 1930
p. 35.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
A Frank Capra Production
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCER
Prod
WRITERS
Dial and adpt
Titles
PHOTOGRAPHY
Photog
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SOUND
Sd mixing eng
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the play Ladies of the Evening by Milton Herbert Gropper (New York, 23 Dec 1924).
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
Ladies of the Evening
Release Date:
5 April 1930
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles opening: 3 April 1930
Copyright Claimant:
Columbia Pictures Corp.
Copyright Date:
1 May 1930
Copyright Number:
LP1295
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric System
Black and White
Sound, also silent
Also si.
Duration(in mins):
102
Length(in feet):
9,118
Length(in reels):
10
Country:
United States
Language:
English
SYNOPSIS

Jerry Strong, the artistic son of a railroad magnate, walks out of his own party when he begins to feel alienated from the revelers. While driving along the waterfront, Jerry sees the bedraggled figure of a woman rowing a boat and stops to offer her a ride back to town. The woman, Kay Arnold, a call girl, tells Jerry that she has also escaped from a party and promptly falls asleep on his shoulder. As she sleeps, Jerry envisions her as the embodiment of his painting "Hope," and offers her a job as his model. The next day at his studio, Jerry begins to argue with Kay about her artificial and hardened appearance when his fiancée, Claire Collins, and his friend, Bill Standish, arrive. Bill finds Kay attractive just the way she is, and invites her to accompany him to Havana, but Kay has fallen in love with Jerry and begins to mold herself to please him. Soon frustrated by Jerry's constant criticisms, she lashes out at him, but later that evening she finally strikes the pose that he wants, and he paints into the night. When Kay collapses from exhaustion, Jerry insists that she sleep on his sofa, but the two spend a wakeful night of longing for each other. The next morning, Kay and Jerry are on the verge of declaring their love for each other when Mr. Strong appears and orders his son to stop seeing Kay. When Jerry refuses to follow his father's orders, Mr. Strong threatens to disown him. Disregarding his father's threat, Jerry decides to marry Kay and move to Arizona, but before ... +


Jerry Strong, the artistic son of a railroad magnate, walks out of his own party when he begins to feel alienated from the revelers. While driving along the waterfront, Jerry sees the bedraggled figure of a woman rowing a boat and stops to offer her a ride back to town. The woman, Kay Arnold, a call girl, tells Jerry that she has also escaped from a party and promptly falls asleep on his shoulder. As she sleeps, Jerry envisions her as the embodiment of his painting "Hope," and offers her a job as his model. The next day at his studio, Jerry begins to argue with Kay about her artificial and hardened appearance when his fiancée, Claire Collins, and his friend, Bill Standish, arrive. Bill finds Kay attractive just the way she is, and invites her to accompany him to Havana, but Kay has fallen in love with Jerry and begins to mold herself to please him. Soon frustrated by Jerry's constant criticisms, she lashes out at him, but later that evening she finally strikes the pose that he wants, and he paints into the night. When Kay collapses from exhaustion, Jerry insists that she sleep on his sofa, but the two spend a wakeful night of longing for each other. The next morning, Kay and Jerry are on the verge of declaring their love for each other when Mr. Strong appears and orders his son to stop seeing Kay. When Jerry refuses to follow his father's orders, Mr. Strong threatens to disown him. Disregarding his father's threat, Jerry decides to marry Kay and move to Arizona, but before they can leave, Mrs. Strong visits Kay and begs her to give Jerry up. Mrs. Strong's emotional plea touches Kay, and she agrees to forsake Jerry, then makes plans to go to Havana with Bill. As Kay leaves with Bill, her roommate, Dot Lamar, runs to tell Jerry that his mother has driven Kay away. Because the elevator man will not let her go up to Jerry's apartment unannounced, and cannot announce her because Jerry is on the phone, Dot must run up the twenty flights of stairs to his penthouse. By the time the overweight Dot arrives at Jerry's penthouse, Kay's ship has sailed, and Kay has decided to end her life by plunging into the icy water. After she jumps, however, she is rescued by a tugboat and awakens to find Jerry at her bedside. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.