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HISTORY

Martin Brown's play was also the basis of the 1933 M-G-M production The Secret of Madame Blanche, directed by Charles Brabin and starring Irene Dunne and Lionel Atwill (see entry). ...

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Martin Brown's play was also the basis of the 1933 M-G-M production The Secret of Madame Blanche, directed by Charles Brabin and starring Irene Dunne and Lionel Atwill (see entry).

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PERSONAL & COMPANY INDEX CREDITS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Film Daily
1 Feb 1925
---
New York Times
27 Jun 1925
p. 11
Variety
28 Jan 1925
p. 32
DETAILS
Release Date:
8 February 1925
Premiere Information:
New York opening: 25 Jan 1925
Production Date:

Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Joseph M. Schenck
19 January 1925
LP21038
Physical Properties:
Silent
Black and White
Length(in feet):
7,357
Length(in reels):
8
Country:
United States
Language:
English
SYNOPSIS

Polly Pearl, a singer in a second-rate English music hall, marries Leonard St. Aubyns, a feckless scion of nobility. Leonard's father immediately disinherits him, and Leonard soon squanders his small stake at Monte Carlo. Leonard later dies, and Polly is reduced to singing in a waterfront cafe in Marseilles in order to support herself and her young son. The elder St. Aubyns attempts to gain possession of the child, claiming that Polly is an unfit mother. Polly entrusts the boy to an English acquaintance, who returns with him to England. Soon after, Polly goes to London, but, after searching the streets for weeks, she can find no trace of her son. Years later, having become the owner of a cafe in Le Havre, Polly witnesses a young English soldier accidentally kill a drunken comrade in a fight. Polly discovers that the soldier is her son and attempts to assume the blame for the shooting, but her son, with the instincts of a gentleman, does not allow a woman to sacrifice herself for him. The boy escapes the authorities and embarks for America and a new life, leaving behind him a mother contented in the merits of her ...

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Polly Pearl, a singer in a second-rate English music hall, marries Leonard St. Aubyns, a feckless scion of nobility. Leonard's father immediately disinherits him, and Leonard soon squanders his small stake at Monte Carlo. Leonard later dies, and Polly is reduced to singing in a waterfront cafe in Marseilles in order to support herself and her young son. The elder St. Aubyns attempts to gain possession of the child, claiming that Polly is an unfit mother. Polly entrusts the boy to an English acquaintance, who returns with him to England. Soon after, Polly goes to London, but, after searching the streets for weeks, she can find no trace of her son. Years later, having become the owner of a cafe in Le Havre, Polly witnesses a young English soldier accidentally kill a drunken comrade in a fight. Polly discovers that the soldier is her son and attempts to assume the blame for the shooting, but her son, with the instincts of a gentleman, does not allow a woman to sacrifice herself for him. The boy escapes the authorities and embarks for America and a new life, leaving behind him a mother contented in the merits of her son.

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Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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