The Last Man on Earth (1924)

70 mins | Fantasy, Comedy | 2 November 1924

Director:

John Blystone

Writer:

Donald W. Lee

Cinematographer:

Allen M. Davey

Production Company:

Fox Film Corp.
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HISTORY

In 1932 and 1933, Fox remade this film in Spanish and English-lanuage versions: El último varón sobre la Tierra and It's Great to Be Alive.
       According to the Library of Congress American Silent Feature Film Survival Database, this film is extant. A film print from the Museum of Modern Art was screened at the Kansas Silent Film Festival on 24 February 2018. ...

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In 1932 and 1933, Fox remade this film in Spanish and English-lanuage versions: El último varón sobre la Tierra and It's Great to Be Alive.
       According to the Library of Congress American Silent Feature Film Survival Database, this film is extant. A film print from the Museum of Modern Art was screened at the Kansas Silent Film Festival on 24 February 2018.

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SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Exhibitors Trade Review
17 Jan 1925
p. 47
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTOR
J. G. Blystone
Dir
PRODUCER
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Allan Davey
Dir of photog
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the novelette The Last Man on Earth by John D. Swain in Munsey's Magazine (Nov 1923).
LITERARY SOURCE AUTHOR
DETAILS
Release Date:
2 November 1924
Production Date:

Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Fox Film Corp.
27 October 1924
LP20789
Physical Properties:
Silent
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
70
Length(in feet):
6,637
Length(in reels):
7
Country:
United States
Language:
English
SYNOPSIS

When Elmer Smith's proposal of marriage is refused by Hattie, his childhood sweetheart, he seeks seclusion in the forest as a hermit. Sometime later (1954), an epidemic of "masculitis" kills all the males in the world over the age of 14 with the single exception of Elmer. When he is discovered by Gertie, a woman gangster on the run, he is taken to Washington and sold to the Government for $10 million. Two senators--the ladies from Virginia and California--then fight it out with boxing gloves in the U. S. Senate chamber to decide who will get Elmer as a husband. Hattie attends the fight, and Elmer--seeing her--rushes to her, claims her for his own, and marries her. A year later, twins are born to them, ensuring the continuation of the human ...

More Less

When Elmer Smith's proposal of marriage is refused by Hattie, his childhood sweetheart, he seeks seclusion in the forest as a hermit. Sometime later (1954), an epidemic of "masculitis" kills all the males in the world over the age of 14 with the single exception of Elmer. When he is discovered by Gertie, a woman gangster on the run, he is taken to Washington and sold to the Government for $10 million. Two senators--the ladies from Virginia and California--then fight it out with boxing gloves in the U. S. Senate chamber to decide who will get Elmer as a husband. Hattie attends the fight, and Elmer--seeing her--rushes to her, claims her for his own, and marries her. A year later, twins are born to them, ensuring the continuation of the human race.

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Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.