Last of the Duanes (1930)

62 mins | Western | 31 August 1930

Director:

Alfred Werker

Writer:

Ernest Pascal

Cinematographer:

Daniel B. Clark

Editor:

Ralph Dietrich

Production Designer:

William Darling

Production Company:

Fox Film Corp.
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HISTORY

A Spanish-language version of Last of the Duanes, El último de los Vargas, also was produced by Fox in 1930. That version was directed by David Howard and starred Jorge Lewis and Luana Alcañiz. The Zane Grey story was first filmed by Fox in 1919 as The Last of the Duanes, directed by J. Gordon Edwards and starring William Farnum. A 1924 film with the same title was directed by Lynn Reynolds and starred Tom Mix and Marian Nixon. Twentieth Century-Fox remade the story again in 1941 as Last of the Duanes. That version was directed by James Tinling and starred George Montgomery and Lynne Roberts (see entries above and below). ...

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A Spanish-language version of Last of the Duanes, El último de los Vargas, also was produced by Fox in 1930. That version was directed by David Howard and starred Jorge Lewis and Luana Alcañiz. The Zane Grey story was first filmed by Fox in 1919 as The Last of the Duanes, directed by J. Gordon Edwards and starring William Farnum. A 1924 film with the same title was directed by Lynn Reynolds and starred Tom Mix and Marian Nixon. Twentieth Century-Fox remade the story again in 1941 as Last of the Duanes. That version was directed by James Tinling and starred George Montgomery and Lynne Roberts (see entries above and below).

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SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Film Daily
14 Sep 1930
---
New York Times
13 Sep 1930
p. 9
Variety
17 Sep 1930
p. 30
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Alfred L. Werker
Dir
PRODUCERS
Assoc prod
Assoc prod
WRITERS
PHOTOGRAPHY
Daniel Clark
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
COSTUMES
SOUND
Rec eng, spanish-language version
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the short story "The Last of the Duanes" by Zane Grey in Argosy (Sep 1914).
LITERARY SOURCE AUTHOR
SONGS
"Cowboy Dan" and "The Outlaw Song," words and music by Cliff Friend.
SONGWRITER/COMPOSER
DETAILS
Release Date:
31 August 1930
Production Date:

Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Fox Film Corp.
3 August 1930
LP1484
Physical Properties:
Sound
Movietone
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
62
Length(in feet):
5,500
Length(in reels):
6
Country:
United States
Language:
English
SYNOPSIS

When Buck Duane returns home to his family’s ranch, he learns that his father has been shot in the back and killed. Worried that she might also lose her son, Buck’s mother makes him promise not to avenge his father’s death. Sometime later, Morgan, the henchman who killed Buck’s father, insults the man's memory, after which Buck returns home, takes his pistol out and goes after Morgan. Buck allows Morgan the chance to arm himself, but Buck is the faster shooter and kills Morgan. Buck must then escape a posse headed by the local sheriff. After eluding the posse, Buck meets Luke Stevens, a man wanted for stealing horses. Later, Stevens is badly wounded by one of the sheriff’s men. Before he dies, Stevens tells Buck that an unscrupulous rancher named Bland has kidnapped Ruth Garrett, a young woman Buck admires, after killing her father. Stevens also reveals the name of a friend, Euchre, who works for Bland but will help rescue Ruth. After arriving at Bland’s ranch, Buck finds Euchre, and together they are able to free Ruth. Finally, Buck redeems himself in the sheriff’s eyes after capturing Bland and bringing him to ...

More Less

When Buck Duane returns home to his family’s ranch, he learns that his father has been shot in the back and killed. Worried that she might also lose her son, Buck’s mother makes him promise not to avenge his father’s death. Sometime later, Morgan, the henchman who killed Buck’s father, insults the man's memory, after which Buck returns home, takes his pistol out and goes after Morgan. Buck allows Morgan the chance to arm himself, but Buck is the faster shooter and kills Morgan. Buck must then escape a posse headed by the local sheriff. After eluding the posse, Buck meets Luke Stevens, a man wanted for stealing horses. Later, Stevens is badly wounded by one of the sheriff’s men. Before he dies, Stevens tells Buck that an unscrupulous rancher named Bland has kidnapped Ruth Garrett, a young woman Buck admires, after killing her father. Stevens also reveals the name of a friend, Euchre, who works for Bland but will help rescue Ruth. After arriving at Bland’s ranch, Buck finds Euchre, and together they are able to free Ruth. Finally, Buck redeems himself in the sheriff’s eyes after capturing Bland and bringing him to justice.

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GENRE
Genre:
Sub-genre:
with songs


Subject
Subject (Major):

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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