Thank You, Mr. Moto (1937)

67-68 mins | Drama | 24 December 1937

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HISTORY

The novel originally appeared as a serial in The Saturday Evening Post (8 Feb--14 Mar 1936). This was the second film in the "Mr. Moto" series. For information about the series, please see the entry below for Think Fast, Mr. Moto and consult the Series Index. ...

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The novel originally appeared as a serial in The Saturday Evening Post (8 Feb--14 Mar 1936). This was the second film in the "Mr. Moto" series. For information about the series, please see the entry below for Think Fast, Mr. Moto and consult the Series Index.

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SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
18 Dec 1937
---
Daily Variety
22 Nov 1937
p. 3
Film Daily
26 Nov 1937
p. 7
Hollywood Reporter
25 Oct 1937
p. 7
Hollywood Reporter
8 Nov 1937
p. 9
Hollywood Reporter
22 Nov 1937
p. 3
Motion Picture Daily
24 Nov 1937
p. 5
Motion Picture Herald
20 Nov 1937
p. 54
New York Times
3 Jan 1938
p. 16
Variety
12 Jan 1938
p. 15
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
2d asst dir
PRODUCER
Exec prod
WRITERS
Contr wrt
PHOTOGRAPHY
Virgil Miller
Photog
2d cam
Asst cam
W. E. Meinardus
Asst cam
Gaffer
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
FILM EDITORS
Film ed
Film ed
Asst cutter
COSTUMES
Cost
Ward man
Ward woman
MUSIC
Mus dir
SOUND
Joseph E. Aiken
Sd
J. Sigler
Asst sd
Boom man
E. J. La Valla
Cable man
MAKEUP
Hair
Makeup
PRODUCTION MISC
Prod mgr
Unit mgr
Scr clerk
Asst grip
Asst prop
Asst prop
Best boy
Still photog
STAND INS
Stunts
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the novel Thank you, Mr. Moto by John P. Marquand (Boston, 1936).
LITERARY SOURCE AUTHOR
DETAILS
Series:
Release Date:
24 December 1937
Production Date:
late Oct--mid Nov 1937
Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corp.
24 December 1937
LP7960
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Mirrophonic Recording
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
67-68
Length(in feet):
6,100
Length(in reels):
7
Country:
United States
PCA No:
3828
SYNOPSIS

In the Great Gobi Desert, a Mongolian named Ning attempts to murder a man in his sleep who recently joined his camel caravan, but the man instead kills Ning. At Peiping, when an ancient scroll is found by police hidden in the man's staff, he escapes to the Grand Hotel where he changes clothes and reveals himself to be Mr. Moto, known as a mysterious adventurer, explorer and soldier of fortune. Moto attends a party given by Colonel Tchernov in honor of Eleanor Joyce, the daughter of a famous importer. After Prince Chung refuses to sell Colonel Tchernov a set of scroll paintings from the Yu'an Dynasty, Tchernov pulls a gun on him. Eleanor sees the prince angrily leave with his mother, Madame Chung, and then finds Tchernov dead. When Moto arranges the death to look like a suicide, Eleanor objects but he warns her that the incident could provoke an international incident. At Chung's home, the prince thanks Moto for saving his life, as Tchernov was about to shoot the prince, when Moto entered and then killed Tchernov with a knife. In gratitude, the prince shows Moto the scrolls, which one of his ancestors painted. If placed in the proper order, the seven original scrolls, five of which the prince has, reveal a map to a great treasure in the hidden tomb of Ghengis Khan. The prince says that a sixth scroll is hidden in the Gobi desert, while the last has recently disappeared from a museum where the Chungs lent it for exhibition. After Moto reveals that he was sent to recover the treasure, Madame Chung rebukes her son for ...

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In the Great Gobi Desert, a Mongolian named Ning attempts to murder a man in his sleep who recently joined his camel caravan, but the man instead kills Ning. At Peiping, when an ancient scroll is found by police hidden in the man's staff, he escapes to the Grand Hotel where he changes clothes and reveals himself to be Mr. Moto, known as a mysterious adventurer, explorer and soldier of fortune. Moto attends a party given by Colonel Tchernov in honor of Eleanor Joyce, the daughter of a famous importer. After Prince Chung refuses to sell Colonel Tchernov a set of scroll paintings from the Yu'an Dynasty, Tchernov pulls a gun on him. Eleanor sees the prince angrily leave with his mother, Madame Chung, and then finds Tchernov dead. When Moto arranges the death to look like a suicide, Eleanor objects but he warns her that the incident could provoke an international incident. At Chung's home, the prince thanks Moto for saving his life, as Tchernov was about to shoot the prince, when Moto entered and then killed Tchernov with a knife. In gratitude, the prince shows Moto the scrolls, which one of his ancestors painted. If placed in the proper order, the seven original scrolls, five of which the prince has, reveal a map to a great treasure in the hidden tomb of Ghengis Khan. The prince says that a sixth scroll is hidden in the Gobi desert, while the last has recently disappeared from a museum where the Chungs lent it for exhibition. After Moto reveals that he was sent to recover the treasure, Madame Chung rebukes her son for showing the scrolls and explains that it is their duty to see that the tomb is not despoiled. When Moto accuses an antique dealer, Pieriera, of stealing the scroll from the museum, Pieriera is about to name the man who paid him when he is shot from a passing car. In Moto's hotel room, he finds his belongings rifled, and when he perceives that the would-be thief is hiding, he places a gun loaded with blanks on a counter for the thief to find. He then takes out his scroll, which the thief, Schneider, steals after shooting Moto with the gun. Moto pretends to die, but then follows Schneider to the Tchernov home, where Eleanor, who is suspicious of Moto, is staying. Eleanor observes Madame Tchernov remove a scroll from her safe and leave with Schneider after speaking on the telephone with someone she calls "darling." Moto then reveals to Eleanor that he is really a detective for an importers' association. He traces the call to the Chung house and prepares to go there, but he is knocked out by the Tchernov butler Ivan. Schneider and his cohort, Eric Koerger, try to torture the prince, who refuses to reveal the hiding place of the scrolls. However, when they strike Madame Chung, the prince succumbs and the scrolls are found. Ashamed of her son, Madame Chung tries to attack the thieves with a dagger, but Koerger shoots and kills her. The thieves, having now obtained all seven scrolls, leave and take Eleanor hostage before Moto arrives with Tom Nelson, a member of the American Legation who has been courting Eleanor. After the prince, believing that he has shamed his ancestors, commits hara-kiri, Moto pledges that no one shall desecrate the tomb. He and Tom follow the thieves to a river where aboard a junk, Moto reveals that the scroll stolen from his room is an imitation. With Eleanor's help, he convinces Madame Tchernov that Koerger planned to get rid of her in favor of Eleanor. A fight breaks out during which Schneider and Koerger are killed. Moto then burns the scrolls thus keeping his promise to Prince Chung, whom, he says, can now face his ancestors without shame.

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Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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