A Lost Lady (1924)

Drama | 18 December 1924

Director:

Harry Beaumont

Writer:

Dorothy Farnum

Cinematographer:

David Abel

Production Company:

Warner Brothers Pictures
Full page view
HISTORY

A news item in the 22 March 1924 Exhibitors Herald announced that Warner Brothers Pictures had purchased screen rights to Willa Cather’s 1923 novel, A Lost Lady, which had recently gone into its seventh edition. The book was described by the New York Tribune as “one of the six best sellers of the season,” according to a 5 April 1924 Motion Picture News brief. Bell Syndicate was said to be issuing a serialized version to newspapers, which were scheduled to run installments of the novel from late March 1924 through the end of the year.
       On 27 September 1924, Exhibitors Trade Review reported that filming was underway at Warner Brothers’ studio, located at 5842 Sunset Boulevard in Hollywood, CA. Principal photography was completed by early November 1924, as noted in the 9 November 1924 Film Daily. A few days later, the 12 November 1924 Variety mentioned that lead actress Irene Rich had come down with a severe cold after “shooting an all-night rain scene” for the film.
       A release date of 24 November 1924 was cited in the 8 November 1924 Exhibitors Trade Review; however the release was delayed until 18 December 1924. According to the 21 December 1924 [Zanesville, OH] Times Signal, a preview screening occurred in mid-December 1924 at the Roosevelt Theatre in Los Angeles, CA. In New York City, the picture was scheduled to open at the Piccadilly Theatre on 17 January 1925, according to an advertisement in the 16 January 1925 New York Daily News.
       The National Film Preservation Board (NFPB) included this ...

More Less

A news item in the 22 March 1924 Exhibitors Herald announced that Warner Brothers Pictures had purchased screen rights to Willa Cather’s 1923 novel, A Lost Lady, which had recently gone into its seventh edition. The book was described by the New York Tribune as “one of the six best sellers of the season,” according to a 5 April 1924 Motion Picture News brief. Bell Syndicate was said to be issuing a serialized version to newspapers, which were scheduled to run installments of the novel from late March 1924 through the end of the year.
       On 27 September 1924, Exhibitors Trade Review reported that filming was underway at Warner Brothers’ studio, located at 5842 Sunset Boulevard in Hollywood, CA. Principal photography was completed by early November 1924, as noted in the 9 November 1924 Film Daily. A few days later, the 12 November 1924 Variety mentioned that lead actress Irene Rich had come down with a severe cold after “shooting an all-night rain scene” for the film.
       A release date of 24 November 1924 was cited in the 8 November 1924 Exhibitors Trade Review; however the release was delayed until 18 December 1924. According to the 21 December 1924 [Zanesville, OH] Times Signal, a preview screening occurred in mid-December 1924 at the Roosevelt Theatre in Los Angeles, CA. In New York City, the picture was scheduled to open at the Piccadilly Theatre on 17 January 1925, according to an advertisement in the 16 January 1925 New York Daily News.
       The National Film Preservation Board (NFPB) included this picture on its list of Lost U.S. Silent Feature Films as of February 2021.

Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Exhibitors Herald
22 Mar 1924
p. 60
Exhibitors Trade Review
27 Sep 1924
p 27
Exhibitors Trade Review
8 Nov 1924
p. 43
Exhibitors Trade Review
21 Jan 1925
p. 51
Film Daily
9 Nov 1924
---
Motion Picture News
5 Apr 1924
p. 1528
New York Daily News
16 Jan 1925
p. 65
Photoplay
Nov 1924
p. 104
Times Signal [Zanesville, OH]
21 Dec 1924
p. 5
Variety
12 Nov 1924
p. 9
Variety
21 Jan 1925
p. 34
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTOR
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the novel A Lost Lady by Willa Cather (New York, 1923).
LITERARY SOURCE AUTHOR
DETAILS
Release Date:
18 December 1924
Premiere Information:
New York opening: 17 Jan 1925
Production Date:
ca. Sep--Oct 1924
Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Warner Brothers Pictures
17 December 1924
LP20921
Physical Properties:
Silent
Black and White
Length(in feet):
7,111
Length(in reels):
7
Country:
United States
Language:
English
SYNOPSIS

Married to Captain Forrester, a wealthy railroad tycoon considerably older than herself, beautiful and frustrated Marian Forrester runs off with Frank Ellinger, who promises to marry her after she obtains a divorce. Marian then discovers that the captain has bankrupted himself trying to save a workingman's bank, and she returns to him out of loyalty; but when she later hears that Ellinger, who she thought would wait for her, is about to be married to someone else, she attempts to go to him. Delayed by a storm, she misses her train and goes instead to the home of Neil Herbert, an old friend and admirer. She calls Ellinger from there and is bluntly rejected. Sometime later, when the captain succumbs to old age and sorrow, Neil takes her in permanently. Marian begins to drink too much and becomes slovenly, but Neil continues to help her until, finding her affectionate with a low country fellow, he disgustedly leaves her. Years later, Neil discovers that she has moved from the American West to South America, apparently happy and still beautiful, the wife of an aged Latin millionaire. ...

More Less

Married to Captain Forrester, a wealthy railroad tycoon considerably older than herself, beautiful and frustrated Marian Forrester runs off with Frank Ellinger, who promises to marry her after she obtains a divorce. Marian then discovers that the captain has bankrupted himself trying to save a workingman's bank, and she returns to him out of loyalty; but when she later hears that Ellinger, who she thought would wait for her, is about to be married to someone else, she attempts to go to him. Delayed by a storm, she misses her train and goes instead to the home of Neil Herbert, an old friend and admirer. She calls Ellinger from there and is bluntly rejected. Sometime later, when the captain succumbs to old age and sorrow, Neil takes her in permanently. Marian begins to drink too much and becomes slovenly, but Neil continues to help her until, finding her affectionate with a low country fellow, he disgustedly leaves her. Years later, Neil discovers that she has moved from the American West to South America, apparently happy and still beautiful, the wife of an aged Latin millionaire.

Less

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

TOP SEARCHES

The Symbol of the Unconquered

This Black independent film was shot in Fort Lee, NJ, under the working title The Wilderness Trail. A 6 Nov 1920 Moving Picture World item noted that editing was ... >>

The Great Dictator

The working title of this picture was The Dictator . In the cast credits at the end of the film, Charles Chaplin is listed in both the "People ... >>

Psycho

Actor Vaughn Taylor's surname is misspelled "Tayler" in the onscreen credits. Several Jun and Jul 1959 HR news items erroneously refer to the film as Psyche. ... >>

Duel in the Sun

Niven Busch's novel was purchased by RKO in 1944. According to a 16 Nov 1944 HR news item, the studio intended to star John Wayne and ... >>

Mystery in Mexico

HR news items add the following information about the production: In Jan 1947, RKO announced that the film was to be a "bi-lingual" release, produced by J. ... >>

The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.