The Lure of Youth (1921)

Romance | 10 January 1921

Director:

Phil Rosen

Writer:

Luther Reed

Producer:

Bayard Veiller

Cinematographer:

Robert Kurrle

Production Company:

Metro Pictures Corp.
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HISTORY

White Ashes, the original story by Luther Reed, was intended for production by Famous Players-Lasky Corp., according to the 19 December 1919 Variety. Nearly nine months later, the 4 August 1920 Wid’s Daily reported that principal photography was underway at the studios of Metro Pictures Corp. in Hollywood, CA.
       An article in the 21 August 1920 Moving Picture World noted that the production utilized Metro’s state-of-the-art lighting system, developed by W. F. Grams, who headed the studio’s “electrical and mechanical department.” The 4 September 1920 Motion Picture News credited D. Anthony Tauszky with creating “art titles” for the feature, which were enhanced with color backgrounds. The completion of filming was reported in the 1 October 1920 Wid’s Daily.
       Three months later, the 4 December 1920 Motion Picture News announced the official title as The Lure of Youth. The film was said to be unusual as it lacked the “ever-present ‘villain’” that characterized most love triangle stories. It also featured several unspecified “scenic effects.” Alta Allen was listed as an additional cast member. A general release took place on 10 January 1921.
       The National Film Preservation Board (NFPB) included this film on its list of Lost U.S. Silent Feature Films as of February 2021.
...

More Less

White Ashes, the original story by Luther Reed, was intended for production by Famous Players-Lasky Corp., according to the 19 December 1919 Variety. Nearly nine months later, the 4 August 1920 Wid’s Daily reported that principal photography was underway at the studios of Metro Pictures Corp. in Hollywood, CA.
       An article in the 21 August 1920 Moving Picture World noted that the production utilized Metro’s state-of-the-art lighting system, developed by W. F. Grams, who headed the studio’s “electrical and mechanical department.” The 4 September 1920 Motion Picture News credited D. Anthony Tauszky with creating “art titles” for the feature, which were enhanced with color backgrounds. The completion of filming was reported in the 1 October 1920 Wid’s Daily.
       Three months later, the 4 December 1920 Motion Picture News announced the official title as The Lure of Youth. The film was said to be unusual as it lacked the “ever-present ‘villain’” that characterized most love triangle stories. It also featured several unspecified “scenic effects.” Alta Allen was listed as an additional cast member. A general release took place on 10 January 1921.
       The National Film Preservation Board (NFPB) included this film on its list of Lost U.S. Silent Feature Films as of February 2021.

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GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Exhibitors Herald
22 Jan 1921
p. 76
Motion Picture News
4 Sep 1920
p. 1915
Motion Picture News
4 Dec 1920
p. 4268
Motion Picture News
22 Jan 1921
p. 917
Motion Picture News
7 May 1921
p. 2976
Moving Picture World
21 Aug 1920
p. 1005
Variety
19 Dec 1919
p. 44
Wid's Daily
4 Aug 1920
p. 4
Wid's Daily
1 Oct 1920
p. 4
Wid's Daily
16 Jan 1921
p. 9
Wid's Daily
27 Feb 1921
---
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTOR
Philip E. Rosen
Dir
PRODUCER
WRITERS
Story
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTOR
Art int
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
White Ashes
Release Date:
10 January 1921
Production Date:
began late July/early August 1920
Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Metro Pictures
15 January 1921
LP16203
Physical Properties:
Silent
Black and White
Length(in reels):
6
Country:
United States
Language:
English
SYNOPSIS

While vacationing in a small New York town, famous actress Florentine Fair falls in love with Roger Dent, an unsophisticated youth with a passion for writing plays. Florentine takes Roger to New York City as her protégé, with the hope that he will find success. Her lover, Morton Mortimer, becomes jealous and convinces the boy that Florentine is an unsavory character. Roger returns to his hometown, and the unhappy experience inspires him to write a masterpiece, which Morton agrees to finance. After Florentine advises Roger to focus on his career, she marries ...

More Less

While vacationing in a small New York town, famous actress Florentine Fair falls in love with Roger Dent, an unsophisticated youth with a passion for writing plays. Florentine takes Roger to New York City as her protégé, with the hope that he will find success. Her lover, Morton Mortimer, becomes jealous and convinces the boy that Florentine is an unsavory character. Roger returns to his hometown, and the unhappy experience inspires him to write a masterpiece, which Morton agrees to finance. After Florentine advises Roger to focus on his career, she marries Morton.

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Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.