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HISTORY

RKO borrowed Romo Vincent from Paramount for this production, which was the first that Jesse Lasky made for the studio. According to HR production charts, Frank M. Thomas and Fred Santley were cast members. HR news items state that Timothy Ward, an "oldtime monologist," and Lionel Pape were also cast. The participation of these actors in the final film has not been confirmed. Several reviewers made note of Alan Mowbray's obvious caricature of well-known orchestra conductor Leopold Stokowski in the picture. According to a HR news item, newsreel company March of Time selected this film as "most representative of the current pictures in production for use in a sequence titled 'Hollywood Influences the World.'" Modern sources state that the film lost $375,000 at the box office. According to modern sources, the cast included the following additional actors: Ben Hall ( Bus passenger ), Larry Steers, Harold Miller and Ralph Brooks ( Guests ), George Meeker ( Orchestra leader ), Stanley Blystone and Pat O'Malley ( Policemen ), Robert Homans ( Desk sergeant ), Harry Tenbrook ( Electrician ), James Donlan ( Suspect with cold ), Russ Powell ( "Asleep in the Deep" singer ), Sam Hayes ( KAFF announcer ), Jac George ( Violinist ), and Ralph Lewis, Mary Carr, Ben Hendricks and William Corson. In addition, modern sources complete the onscreen character list: Grant Mitchell ( District Attorney Ernest Robinson ), Lee Patrick ( Nora Burns ) and Alan Bruce ( The groom [The director] ... More Less

RKO borrowed Romo Vincent from Paramount for this production, which was the first that Jesse Lasky made for the studio. According to HR production charts, Frank M. Thomas and Fred Santley were cast members. HR news items state that Timothy Ward, an "oldtime monologist," and Lionel Pape were also cast. The participation of these actors in the final film has not been confirmed. Several reviewers made note of Alan Mowbray's obvious caricature of well-known orchestra conductor Leopold Stokowski in the picture. According to a HR news item, newsreel company March of Time selected this film as "most representative of the current pictures in production for use in a sequence titled 'Hollywood Influences the World.'" Modern sources state that the film lost $375,000 at the box office. According to modern sources, the cast included the following additional actors: Ben Hall ( Bus passenger ), Larry Steers, Harold Miller and Ralph Brooks ( Guests ), George Meeker ( Orchestra leader ), Stanley Blystone and Pat O'Malley ( Policemen ), Robert Homans ( Desk sergeant ), Harry Tenbrook ( Electrician ), James Donlan ( Suspect with cold ), Russ Powell ( "Asleep in the Deep" singer ), Sam Hayes ( KAFF announcer ), Jac George ( Violinist ), and Ralph Lewis, Mary Carr, Ben Hendricks and William Corson. In addition, modern sources complete the onscreen character list: Grant Mitchell ( District Attorney Ernest Robinson ), Lee Patrick ( Nora Burns ) and Alan Bruce ( The groom [The director] ). More Less

BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
9 Sep 37
p. 3.
Film Daily
15 Sep 37
p. 8.
Hollywood Reporter
11 Jun 37
p. 4.
Hollywood Reporter
12 Jun 37
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
14 Jun 37
pp. 16-17.
Hollywood Reporter
28 Jun 37
p. 22.
Hollywood Reporter
6 Jul 37
p. 8.
Hollywood Reporter
8 Jul 37
p. 8.
Hollywood Reporter
21 Jul 37
p. 15.
Hollywood Reporter
23 Jul 37
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
30 Jul 37
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
10 Sep 37
p. 3.
Motion Picture Daily
13 Sep 37
p. 2.
Motion Picture Herald
17 Jul 37
p. 69.
Motion Picture Herald
18 Sep 37
, 13776
New York Times
23 Oct 37
p. 14.
Variety
15 Sep 37
p. 13.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTOR
PRODUCER
Exec prod
WRITERS
Orig story
Contr to scr const
Contr to scr const
Contr to scr const
PHOTOGRAPHY
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir assoc
FILM EDITOR
SET DECORATOR
Set dresser
COSTUMES
MUSIC
SOUND
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff
SOURCES
SONGS
"I Want the World to Know" and "Bambina," music by Rudolf Friml, lyrics by Gus Kahn
"Music for Madame," music and lyrics by Herbert Magidson and Allie Wrubel
"King of the Road," music and lyrics by Nathaniel Shilkret and Eddie Cherkose
+
SONGS
"I Want the World to Know" and "Bambina," music by Rudolf Friml, lyrics by Gus Kahn
"Music for Madame," music and lyrics by Herbert Magidson and Allie Wrubel
"King of the Road," music and lyrics by Nathaniel Shilkret and Eddie Cherkose
"Vesti la giubba" from the opera I pagliacci by Ruggiero Leoncavallo.
+
DETAILS
Release Date:
8 October 1937
Production Date:
10 June--29 July 1937
Copyright Claimant:
RKO Radio Pictures, inc.
Copyright Date:
1 October 1937
Copyright Number:
LP7450
Physical Properties:
Sound
RCA Victor System
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
77
Length(in reels):
8
Country:
United States
PCA No:
3500
SYNOPSIS

When jewel thieves Morton Harding and Rollins hear Italian immigrant Nino Maretti singing on a Hollywood-bound bus, they plot to use him as part of their scheme to rob motion picture director William Goodwin. By pretending to be talent scouts, Harding and Rollins convince Nino to perform unannounced at the wedding reception of Goodwin's daughter, where a valuable pearl necklace is on display. During Nino's stunning solo, which draws the opera-loving Detective Flugelman away from his watch, Harding and Rollins steal the necklace then, with Nino in tow, flee. After the theft is reported, District Attorney Robinson questions Jean Clemens, an aspiring operetta composer who had "crashed" the Goodwin wedding to meet famous conductor Leon Rodowsky. At the same time, Nino, who has been warned to keep quiet by the crooks, shows up at the police station, but is scared off when he realizes that he is the police's only suspect. As he leaves the station, Nino meets Jean and tells her that he is a music promoter whose most valuable possession has been stolen. After enjoying a romantic evening with Nino, Jean finds him a job as an extra for a movie musical that is being directed by Rodowsky. Because Rodowsky has been called on repeatedly by Robinson to identify the mystery tenor's voice, Nino, fearing for his life, remains mute. Later, however, Jean hears Nino singing one of her songs and, hurt by his apparent deception, angrily rejects him. As an apology, Nino turns himself in to collect Goodwin's $25,000 reward, which he tells Jean's roommate Nora to use to finance Jean's operetta. Before he claims the reward, Flugelman shows up ... +


When jewel thieves Morton Harding and Rollins hear Italian immigrant Nino Maretti singing on a Hollywood-bound bus, they plot to use him as part of their scheme to rob motion picture director William Goodwin. By pretending to be talent scouts, Harding and Rollins convince Nino to perform unannounced at the wedding reception of Goodwin's daughter, where a valuable pearl necklace is on display. During Nino's stunning solo, which draws the opera-loving Detective Flugelman away from his watch, Harding and Rollins steal the necklace then, with Nino in tow, flee. After the theft is reported, District Attorney Robinson questions Jean Clemens, an aspiring operetta composer who had "crashed" the Goodwin wedding to meet famous conductor Leon Rodowsky. At the same time, Nino, who has been warned to keep quiet by the crooks, shows up at the police station, but is scared off when he realizes that he is the police's only suspect. As he leaves the station, Nino meets Jean and tells her that he is a music promoter whose most valuable possession has been stolen. After enjoying a romantic evening with Nino, Jean finds him a job as an extra for a movie musical that is being directed by Rodowsky. Because Rodowsky has been called on repeatedly by Robinson to identify the mystery tenor's voice, Nino, fearing for his life, remains mute. Later, however, Jean hears Nino singing one of her songs and, hurt by his apparent deception, angrily rejects him. As an apology, Nino turns himself in to collect Goodwin's $25,000 reward, which he tells Jean's roommate Nora to use to finance Jean's operetta. Before he claims the reward, Flugelman shows up with Spaghetti Nadzio, a cabaret tenor whom the detective is sure is Nino. To prove Nadzio's identity, Flugelman and Robinson arrange a radio broadcast in which the two tenors are to sing the same aria. When Rodowsky hears Nino singing, he immediately recognizes his voice but, in order to protect his brilliant "discovery," tells the police that Nino is innocent. Rodowsky then offers Nino a chance to sing at the Hollywood Bowl. Just before the performance, however, the jewel thieves send two of their henchmen to "silence" Nino, but the thugs mistake Nadzio for Nino and are later apprehended by Flugelman. Cleared of all suspicion, Nino tops off his sensational debut by singing one of Jean's compositions, which makes him a hit with both the audience and Jean. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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