Hawaii Calls (1938)

71-73 mins | Drama | 11 March 1938

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HISTORY

Don Blanding was Hawaii's "island poet," according to MPH. Onscreen credits state that the film's title was "inspired by Radio Station K.G.M.B." in Honolulu. Opening and closing onscreen credits vary in cast order. In the opening credits of the viewed print, Ward Bond and Mamo Clark are given top billing, and Raymond Paige and His Orchestra are given a special mention on the title card. It is possible that the opening credits were changed for television broadcast. A HR news item adds Margaret Cole to the cast, but her participation in the final film has not been confirmed. ...

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Don Blanding was Hawaii's "island poet," according to MPH. Onscreen credits state that the film's title was "inspired by Radio Station K.G.M.B." in Honolulu. Opening and closing onscreen credits vary in cast order. In the opening credits of the viewed print, Ward Bond and Mamo Clark are given top billing, and Raymond Paige and His Orchestra are given a special mention on the title card. It is possible that the opening credits were changed for television broadcast. A HR news item adds Margaret Cole to the cast, but her participation in the final film has not been confirmed.

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SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
24 Feb 1938
p. 3
Film Daily
25 Feb 1938
p. 6
Hollywood Reporter
30 Oct 1937
p. 5
Hollywood Reporter
16 Nov 1937
p. 11
Hollywood Reporter
6 Dec 1937
pp. 14-15
Hollywood Reporter
24 Feb 1938
p. 3
Motion Picture Daily
24 Feb 1938
p. 8
Motion Picture Herald
4 Dec 1937
p. 38
Motion Picture Herald
5 Mar 1938
p. 37, 40
New York Times
29 Apr 1938
p. 17
Variety
2 Mar 1938
p. 15
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCERS
Prod
WRITERS
Dan Jarrett
Contr to trmt
PHOTOGRAPHY
Photog
Hawaiian backgrounds [photog by]
ART DIRECTOR
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
COSTUMES
Wardrobe supv
MUSIC
Mus score
Mus supv
Vocal supv
SOUND
DANCE
Dance dir
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the novel Stowaways in Paradise by Don Blanding (New York, 1931).
LITERARY SOURCE AUTHOR
MUSIC
"España" by Alexis-Emmanuel Chabrier.
SONGS
"Hawaii Calls" and "Down Where the Trade Winds Blow," words and music by Harry Owens; "That's the Hawaiian in Me," words and music by Johnny Noble and Margarita Lake; "Song of the Islands," words and music by Charles E. King; "Macushla," words and music by Josephine V. Rowe and Dermot MacMurrough.
DETAILS
Release Date:
11 March 1938
Production Date:
5 Nov--mid Dec 1937
Physical Properties:
Sound
RCA Sound System
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
71-73
Country:
United States
PCA No:
4007
Passed by NBR:
Yes
SYNOPSIS

When ocean liner stowaways Billy Coulter and Pua, a young Hawaiian, are caught in the cabin of Strings, a songwriter and ship musician, Captain O'Hare tells the orphan Billy that he will be sent back to San Francisco as soon as the boat docks in Honolulu. Although Billy's singing abilities impress the captain, he remains adamant about returning him, and consequently, when the ship lands, Billy and Pua dive overboard and swim to freedom on shore. In Honolulu, Pua takes Billy to his sister Hina, who shields him from the police. Concerned for Billy's safety, Hina then takes the boys to Maui, where Aunty Pinau lives, and is joined by Strings, who has violated his rule about not setting foot on the islands he writes about in order to search for the stowaways. After a few idyllic days on Maui, Billy is spotted by Navy commander Joe Milburn and his wife, former passengers on O'Hare's ship who are visiting the well-to-do Harlows. Unknown to Milburn, a group of foreign agents are plotting to steal secret government papers from him with the help of Julius, a trusted Harlow servant. That night, at Aunty Pinau's annual luau, Milburn confronts Billy and convinces him to return to Captain O'Hare to clear his name. On his way to the marina, Billy and chauffeur Julius are stopped and questioned by police about Milburn's stolen papers. Billy, remembering a conversation he overheard while exploring a cave with Pua, realizes that Julius is the thief and escapes from the car. Eventually, Billy and Pua lead Milburn and the police to the spies and are hailed as national heroes ...

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When ocean liner stowaways Billy Coulter and Pua, a young Hawaiian, are caught in the cabin of Strings, a songwriter and ship musician, Captain O'Hare tells the orphan Billy that he will be sent back to San Francisco as soon as the boat docks in Honolulu. Although Billy's singing abilities impress the captain, he remains adamant about returning him, and consequently, when the ship lands, Billy and Pua dive overboard and swim to freedom on shore. In Honolulu, Pua takes Billy to his sister Hina, who shields him from the police. Concerned for Billy's safety, Hina then takes the boys to Maui, where Aunty Pinau lives, and is joined by Strings, who has violated his rule about not setting foot on the islands he writes about in order to search for the stowaways. After a few idyllic days on Maui, Billy is spotted by Navy commander Joe Milburn and his wife, former passengers on O'Hare's ship who are visiting the well-to-do Harlows. Unknown to Milburn, a group of foreign agents are plotting to steal secret government papers from him with the help of Julius, a trusted Harlow servant. That night, at Aunty Pinau's annual luau, Milburn confronts Billy and convinces him to return to Captain O'Hare to clear his name. On his way to the marina, Billy and chauffeur Julius are stopped and questioned by police about Milburn's stolen papers. Billy, remembering a conversation he overheard while exploring a cave with Pua, realizes that Julius is the thief and escapes from the car. Eventually, Billy and Pua lead Milburn and the police to the spies and are hailed as national heroes for their efforts. Billy then sings farewell to Hawaii as he and the Milburns set sail for San Francisco.

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Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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