So Red the Rose (1935)

90-91 mins | Drama | 22 November 1935

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HISTORY

A DV news item noted that in an effort to hasten production, director King Vidor had his wife, writer Elizabeth Hill, direct some scenes with Margaret Sullavan, while he directed crowd scenes. According to copyright records, William G. Beymer acted as Southern adviser, and William H. Hazell, who served in the Civil War, reproduced antiques from that era. A production still from the film indicates that father and daughter actors Maurice and Helene Costello appeared in the wedding scene of the film, but they were not identified on the viewed print. The film reportedly cost $1,000,000 to produce. The United Daughters of the Confederacy contributed information for the production. Paramount borrowed Margaret Sullavan from Universal for this film. According to a DV news item, some scenes were shot on location at Sherwood Lake, ... More Less

A DV news item noted that in an effort to hasten production, director King Vidor had his wife, writer Elizabeth Hill, direct some scenes with Margaret Sullavan, while he directed crowd scenes. According to copyright records, William G. Beymer acted as Southern adviser, and William H. Hazell, who served in the Civil War, reproduced antiques from that era. A production still from the film indicates that father and daughter actors Maurice and Helene Costello appeared in the wedding scene of the film, but they were not identified on the viewed print. The film reportedly cost $1,000,000 to produce. The United Daughters of the Confederacy contributed information for the production. Paramount borrowed Margaret Sullavan from Universal for this film. According to a DV news item, some scenes were shot on location at Sherwood Lake, CA. More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
19 Jun 35
p. 1.
Daily Variety
2 Aug 35
p. 3.
Daily Variety
4 Nov 35
p. 3.
Film Daily
9 Nov 35
p. 7.
Hollywood Reporter
10 Aug 35
p. 4.
Hollywood Reporter
4 Nov 35
p. 3.
Motion Picture Daily
5 Nov 35
p. 6.
Motion Picture Herald
17 Aug 35
p. 41.
Motion Picture Herald
16 Nov 35
p. 63.
New York Times
28 Nov 35
p. 39.
Variety
4 Dec 35
p. 15.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Fill-In dir
Asst dir
PRODUCERS
PHOTOGRAPHY
Photog
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
COSTUMES
Miss Sullavan's cost des
MUSIC
Mus score
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the novel So Red the Rose by Stark Young (New York, 1934).
AUTHOR
DETAILS
Release Date:
22 November 1935
Production Date:
19 June--9 August 1935
Copyright Claimant:
Paramount Productions, Inc.
Copyright Date:
22 November 1935
Copyright Number:
LP5970
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Noiseless Recording
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
90-91
Length(in reels):
9
Country:
United States
PCA No:
1173
SYNOPSIS

In 1861 at the Portobello plantation in Mississippi, Valette Bedford is in love with her cousin Duncan and flirts incessantly with him to draw his attention. Duncan plays cool, however, treating her as if she were a young child. Out of spite, Valette pretends to fall madly in love with her brother Edward's Texan friend, Archie Pendleton. When Archie proposes to her, she is flabbergasted and does not respond definitively, but as he is dashing off to the Civil War, he assumes that she will be waiting for him. Edward stays behind at the urging of his family, but later comes to regret his decision when he finds out Archie has been honorably killed in battle. Edward then leaves with his father's blessing. Duncan, however, refuses to fight his Northern neighbors on the grounds that many of them are friends and Americans should not fight Americans. Valette becomes disgusted by his attitude and believes it only covers cowardice. After some Yankees kidnap Valette's father Malcolm as a guide, he returns determined to go to war. After Malcolm leaves, his wife Sally has a vision of her son Edward dead on the battlefield, and accompanied by Duncan and her faithful black slave, she goes to find his body. Prior to his leaving, Valette had apologized to Duncan and had pledged her love for him. Moved by the sight of the battlefield strewn with slain Confederate soldiers, Duncan marches off to war with a battle cry, leaving Sally and William to return Edward's body. News reaches the Bedford slaves that General Ulysses S. Grant has taken Vicksburg, and their excitement leads them ... +


In 1861 at the Portobello plantation in Mississippi, Valette Bedford is in love with her cousin Duncan and flirts incessantly with him to draw his attention. Duncan plays cool, however, treating her as if she were a young child. Out of spite, Valette pretends to fall madly in love with her brother Edward's Texan friend, Archie Pendleton. When Archie proposes to her, she is flabbergasted and does not respond definitively, but as he is dashing off to the Civil War, he assumes that she will be waiting for him. Edward stays behind at the urging of his family, but later comes to regret his decision when he finds out Archie has been honorably killed in battle. Edward then leaves with his father's blessing. Duncan, however, refuses to fight his Northern neighbors on the grounds that many of them are friends and Americans should not fight Americans. Valette becomes disgusted by his attitude and believes it only covers cowardice. After some Yankees kidnap Valette's father Malcolm as a guide, he returns determined to go to war. After Malcolm leaves, his wife Sally has a vision of her son Edward dead on the battlefield, and accompanied by Duncan and her faithful black slave, she goes to find his body. Prior to his leaving, Valette had apologized to Duncan and had pledged her love for him. Moved by the sight of the battlefield strewn with slain Confederate soldiers, Duncan marches off to war with a battle cry, leaving Sally and William to return Edward's body. News reaches the Bedford slaves that General Ulysses S. Grant has taken Vicksburg, and their excitement leads them to revolt against their work. A wounded Malcolm then arrives home and dies, after which Sally, heartbroken, frees their slaves. Sally, her little son Middleton, Valette and their cousin Mary maintain the house, helped by William, until Yankee soldiers invade the mansion. Valette takes pity on one young Yankee soldier who, although originally intending to rob them, has been injured and is being hunted by Confederate soldiers. She dresses him in her brother's uniform and puts him to bed, and is astonished to discover that one of the pursuing Confederate soldiers is Duncan. Duncan has changed markedly--he is no longer a pacifist--and Valette must plead for the boy's life. Although Duncan protects him, the boy dies and the family is thrown out of their own house when the Yankees set fire to it. Duncan then rejoins his troops. By the war's end, the much-reduced family is living in a small house and cooking on an outdoor stove. One day, Valette hears Duncan calling to her, and they reunite in the woods. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.