Mare Nostrum (1926)

Drama | 29 August 1926

Director:

Rex Ingram

Writer:

Willis Goldbeck

Producer:

Rex Ingram

Cinematographer:

John F. Seitz

Editor:

Grant Whytock

Production Designer:

Ben Carré

Production Company:

Metro-Goldwyn Corp.
Full page view
HISTORY

In a column called "A Letter from Location" in the Feb 1926 Picture-Play, Alice Terry recounted the production's itinerary. Their headquarters was a studio outside of Nice, France. The company traveled to Monte Carlo in Monaco, then sailed to Naples, Italy, where they spent four days. From there, they filmed for three days in nearby Pompeii, at the foot of Mt. Vesuvius, then drove a hundred miles over primitive roads to the ancient Greek ruins at Paestum, Italy. From there, they filmed in Venice, Italy, then returned to Nice. The company spent a total of four months on location, according to Terry. Filming was also done on the Mediterranean Sea, in Barcelona, Spain, and in Rome, Italy.
       Rex Ingram fought to keep the novel's Latin title, but reluctantly allowed the studio to add the English translation, “Our Sea,” when he heard that some people thought the film was about a horse.
       A Warner Bros. print of Mare Nostrum was screened 2 Jun 2018 at the 23rd Annual San Francisco Silent Film Festival in San Francisco, ... More Less

In a column called "A Letter from Location" in the Feb 1926 Picture-Play, Alice Terry recounted the production's itinerary. Their headquarters was a studio outside of Nice, France. The company traveled to Monte Carlo in Monaco, then sailed to Naples, Italy, where they spent four days. From there, they filmed for three days in nearby Pompeii, at the foot of Mt. Vesuvius, then drove a hundred miles over primitive roads to the ancient Greek ruins at Paestum, Italy. From there, they filmed in Venice, Italy, then returned to Nice. The company spent a total of four months on location, according to Terry. Filming was also done on the Mediterranean Sea, in Barcelona, Spain, and in Rome, Italy.
       Rex Ingram fought to keep the novel's Latin title, but reluctantly allowed the studio to add the English translation, “Our Sea,” when he heard that some people thought the film was about a horse.
       A Warner Bros. print of Mare Nostrum was screened 2 Jun 2018 at the 23rd Annual San Francisco Silent Film Festival in San Francisco, CA. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Film Daily
28 Feb 1926
p. 6.
Moving Picture World
27 Feb 1926
pp. 785-86.
New York Times
16 Feb 1926
p. 22.
Picture-Play
Feb 1926
p. 91, 100.
Variety
17 Feb 1926
p. 40.
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
Our Sea
Release Date:
29 August 1926
Premiere Information:
New York opening: 15 February 1926
Copyright Claimant:
Metro-Goldwyn Corp.
Copyright Date:
30 August 1926
Copyright Number:
LP23075
Physical Properties:
Silent
Cut to 10 reels, 9,894 ft. for release
Black and White
Length(in feet):
11,000
Length(in reels):
11
Country:
United States
Language:
English
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Captain Ulysses Ferragut, the last of a famous Spanish family of seafaring fame, meets Freya Talberg, a beautiful and ruthless German spy, in Pompeii, Italy, and falls in love with her. Freya's superiors plan to use Ulysses' knowledge of the Mediterranean to assist them in supplying their submarines with fuel, using Freya as bait. Later, Ulysses returns to Naples to find Freya and her spy ring departed, and he learns that his son Esteban, whom he idolizes, has been killed on a torpedoed liner. Seeking revenge for the death of his son and his own mistakes, he turns his ship, the Mare Nostrum, over to the French and volunteers as commander. Freya, disheartened by the results of her work, sends for Ulysses, but the memory of Esteban causes him to cast her off, and she is executed by the French for espionage. Ulysses' ship is torpedoed; and though he sinks, his attacker is itself swallowed up by the ... +


Captain Ulysses Ferragut, the last of a famous Spanish family of seafaring fame, meets Freya Talberg, a beautiful and ruthless German spy, in Pompeii, Italy, and falls in love with her. Freya's superiors plan to use Ulysses' knowledge of the Mediterranean to assist them in supplying their submarines with fuel, using Freya as bait. Later, Ulysses returns to Naples to find Freya and her spy ring departed, and he learns that his son Esteban, whom he idolizes, has been killed on a torpedoed liner. Seeking revenge for the death of his son and his own mistakes, he turns his ship, the Mare Nostrum, over to the French and volunteers as commander. Freya, disheartened by the results of her work, sends for Ulysses, but the memory of Esteban causes him to cast her off, and she is executed by the French for espionage. Ulysses' ship is torpedoed; and though he sinks, his attacker is itself swallowed up by the sea. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

TOP SEARCHES

CASABLANCA

During World War II, Casablanca, Morocco is a waiting point for throngs of desperate refugees fleeing Nazi-occupied Europe. Exit visas, which are necessary to leave the country, are at ... >>

CITIZEN KANE

Seventy-year-old newspaper tycoon Charles Foster Kane dies in his palatial Florida home, Xanadu, after uttering the single word “Rosebud.” While watching a newsreel summarizing the years during which Kane ... >>

REAR WINDOW

Laid up with a broken leg during the height of summer, renowned New York magazine photographer L. B. “Jeff” Jeffries enters his last week of home confinement, bored and ... >>

RAGING BULL

In 1941, at a boxing match in Cleveland, Ohio, pandemonium breaks out when Jake La Motta, an up-and-coming young boxer, loses a decision to Jimmy Reeves, suffering his first ... >>

CITY LIGHTS

At an outdoor dedication ceremony, a tramp is discovered sleeping in the arms of a statue as it is being unveiled before a crowd. He is chased into ... >>

The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.