Massacre (1934)

69-70 or 74 mins | Drama | 20 January 1934

Director:

Alan Crosland

Cinematographer:

George Barnes

Editor:

Terry Morse

Production Designer:

John Hughes

Production Company:

First National Pictures, Inc.
Full page view
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
18 Dec 33
p. 3.
Film Daily
18 Jan 34
p. 8.
Motion Picture Daily
18 Jan 34
p. 11.
Motion Picture Herald
27 Jan 34
p. 41, 44
New York Times
Jan 18 1934
p. 19.
Variety
23 Jan 34
p. 13.
DETAILS
Release Date:
20 January 1934
Copyright Claimant:
First National Pictures, Inc.
Copyright Date:
16 January 1934
Copyright Number:
LP4411
Physical Properties:
Sound
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
69-70 or 74
Length(in reels):
8
Country:
United States
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Joe Thunder Horse makes a lot of money stunt riding at the Chicago World's Fair and, when not working, lives a modern life. He becomes aware of how little he knows about his Sioux background when his white girl friend Norma proudly shows him Indian artifacts that she has purchased as decorations. Joe, learning that his father is dying, returns to the reservation where he finds that his father is not receiving medical care. Lydia, a college-educated Indian, warns Joe that life on the reservation is not what he thinks. Joe slowly realizes that the white leadership of the reservation is corrupt. Doctor Turner never treats the sick, and Elihu P. Quissenberry, the agent, and Shanks, the undertaker, are running a racket to get Indian lands from the families of the dead. When Joe's father dies, Joe refuses to allow Shanks to bury him, choosing instead to hold a traditional Indian funeral. At the funeral, Shanks rapes Joe's sister Jenny. After he learns what happened, Joe drags Shanks behind his car, severely injuring him. Quissenberry arrests Joe for attempted murder, and his court appointed lawyer pleads him guilty. Lydia sneaks Joe a set of car keys, and he escapes to Washington, D.C., where he tells the whole story to J. R. Dickinson, head of the Bureau of Indian Affairs. Dickinson agrees to help Joe fight for Indian rights. Shanks dies and Joe is arrested for murder. Quissenberry's men kidnap Jenny to keep her from testifying. Once again, Joe escapes from jail to find her. After she is found, Quissenberry reveals his corruption and is removed from office. ... +


Joe Thunder Horse makes a lot of money stunt riding at the Chicago World's Fair and, when not working, lives a modern life. He becomes aware of how little he knows about his Sioux background when his white girl friend Norma proudly shows him Indian artifacts that she has purchased as decorations. Joe, learning that his father is dying, returns to the reservation where he finds that his father is not receiving medical care. Lydia, a college-educated Indian, warns Joe that life on the reservation is not what he thinks. Joe slowly realizes that the white leadership of the reservation is corrupt. Doctor Turner never treats the sick, and Elihu P. Quissenberry, the agent, and Shanks, the undertaker, are running a racket to get Indian lands from the families of the dead. When Joe's father dies, Joe refuses to allow Shanks to bury him, choosing instead to hold a traditional Indian funeral. At the funeral, Shanks rapes Joe's sister Jenny. After he learns what happened, Joe drags Shanks behind his car, severely injuring him. Quissenberry arrests Joe for attempted murder, and his court appointed lawyer pleads him guilty. Lydia sneaks Joe a set of car keys, and he escapes to Washington, D.C., where he tells the whole story to J. R. Dickinson, head of the Bureau of Indian Affairs. Dickinson agrees to help Joe fight for Indian rights. Shanks dies and Joe is arrested for murder. Quissenberry's men kidnap Jenny to keep her from testifying. Once again, Joe escapes from jail to find her. After she is found, Quissenberry reveals his corruption and is removed from office. Dickinson offers Joe a job, which frees Joe to ask Lydia to marry him. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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