Morocco (1930)

90 mins | Drama | 6 December 1930

Writer:

Jules Furthman

Cinematographer:

Lee Garmes

Editor:

Sam Winston

Production Designer:

Hans Dreier

Production Company:

Paramount Publix Corp.
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HISTORY

Marlene Dietrich also sings "Quand l'amour meurt" by Millandy and Crémieux. Morocco marked the first American film for Dietrich (1901--1992). The German-born actress was already well-known to American audiences for her portrayal of "Lola Loa" in the 1930 German film The Blue Angel (Der blaue Engel), which also was directed by Josef von Sternberg. ...

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Marlene Dietrich also sings "Quand l'amour meurt" by Millandy and Crémieux. Morocco marked the first American film for Dietrich (1901--1992). The German-born actress was already well-known to American audiences for her portrayal of "Lola Loa" in the 1930 German film The Blue Angel (Der blaue Engel), which also was directed by Josef von Sternberg.

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SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Exhibitors Herald World
25 Oct 1930
p. 42
Film Daily
16 Nov 1930
p. 10
Life
5 Dec 1930
p. 36, 44
New York Times
17 Nov 1930
p. 29
Time
24 Nov 1930
p. 64
Variety
19 Nov 1930
p. 21
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTOR
WRITERS
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Addl photog
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SOUND
Harry D. Mills
Rec eng
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the novel Amy Jolly, die Frau aus Marrakesch by Benno Vigny (Berlin-Friedenau, 1927).
LITERARY SOURCE AUTHOR
SONGS
"Give Me the Man Who Does Things" and "What Am I Bid for My Apples?" words by Leo Robin, music by Karl Hajos.
SONGWRITER/COMPOSER
DETAILS
Release Date:
6 December 1930
Premiere Information:
New York opening: 14 Nov 1930
Production Date:

Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Paramount Publix Corp.
5 December 1930
LP1793
Physical Properties:
Sound
Movietone
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
90
Length(in feet):
8,237
Length(in reels):
12
Country:
United States
Language:
English
SYNOPSIS

Tom Brown, a devil-may-care American Legionnaire and ruthless in his treatment of women, is singled out for attention by cabaret singer Amy Jolly despite the clamor of other suitors, among them debonair man-of-the-world Kennington. Surreptitiously she arranges a rendezvous with Tom in her apartment, where he finds her embittered with life and scornful of men, though hypnotically attractive. He leaves abruptly and goes into the street to meet an officer's wife, but Amy, intrigued by him, follows and interrupts their interview; the woman urges the street beggars to attack Amy, but Tom defends her, and he is arrested and assigned to a dangerous mission. Learning that Kennington has offered her wealth and happiness, Tom elects to remain at a desert outpost after accomplishing his mission. Amy hears that he is wounded and goes to the post, accompanied by Kennington; realizing their love, Kennington offers to aid Tom in deserting the Legion. Tom, however, tells Amy that if she loves him, she must be prepared to be a good soldier; as he marches with his column into the desert, Amy joins the ragged wives and sweethearts who follow in the trail of the departing ...

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Tom Brown, a devil-may-care American Legionnaire and ruthless in his treatment of women, is singled out for attention by cabaret singer Amy Jolly despite the clamor of other suitors, among them debonair man-of-the-world Kennington. Surreptitiously she arranges a rendezvous with Tom in her apartment, where he finds her embittered with life and scornful of men, though hypnotically attractive. He leaves abruptly and goes into the street to meet an officer's wife, but Amy, intrigued by him, follows and interrupts their interview; the woman urges the street beggars to attack Amy, but Tom defends her, and he is arrested and assigned to a dangerous mission. Learning that Kennington has offered her wealth and happiness, Tom elects to remain at a desert outpost after accomplishing his mission. Amy hears that he is wounded and goes to the post, accompanied by Kennington; realizing their love, Kennington offers to aid Tom in deserting the Legion. Tom, however, tells Amy that if she loves him, she must be prepared to be a good soldier; as he marches with his column into the desert, Amy joins the ragged wives and sweethearts who follow in the trail of the departing soldiers.

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GENRE
Genre:
Sub-genre:
with songs


Subject

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.