Navy Blues (1929)

75 mins | Comedy | 20 December 1929

Director:

Clarence Brown

Cinematographer:

Merritt Gerstad

Editor:

Hugh Wynn

Production Designer:

Cedric Gibbons

Production Company:

Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Corp.
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HISTORY

Navy Blues was first announced in the 31 Jan 1929 FD as a forthcoming Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Corp. (M-G-M) silent film called The Gob, starring William Haines. At that time, Edward Sedgwick was the director. The 16 Feb 1929 Motion Picture News named Anita Page as Haines’s co-star. According to the 30 Mar 1929 issue, filming was halted after several days of production for “re-vamping” of the story. The 24 Apr 1929 and 8 May 1929 issues of Var indicated that the picture would now be made as an “all-talker,” and W. L. River and J. C. Nugent were named as dialogue writers. On 18 May 1929, Motion Picture News reported that production was resuming under the direction of E. Mason Hopper, as Sedgwick had begun another assignment by that time.
       The 6 Jul 1929 Hollywood Filmograph announced the new title, Navy Blues, and named Clarence Brown as the director. The 20 Jul 1929 Motion Picture News explained that all the previous work done on The Gob had been scrapped, and the story had been changed, keeping only the “naval background.” Haines and Page were still attached to co-star in the “all talking” production, which would mark the first for Haines. Principal photography on the revamped picture began on 20 Jul 1929, as indicated in the 3 Aug 1929 Motion Picture News.
       The 14 Aug 1929 Var reported that filming was currently taking place “on the Pacific with the destroyer fleet.”
       The 10 Aug 1929 and 7 Sep 1929 editions of Motion Picture News added ...

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Navy Blues was first announced in the 31 Jan 1929 FD as a forthcoming Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Corp. (M-G-M) silent film called The Gob, starring William Haines. At that time, Edward Sedgwick was the director. The 16 Feb 1929 Motion Picture News named Anita Page as Haines’s co-star. According to the 30 Mar 1929 issue, filming was halted after several days of production for “re-vamping” of the story. The 24 Apr 1929 and 8 May 1929 issues of Var indicated that the picture would now be made as an “all-talker,” and W. L. River and J. C. Nugent were named as dialogue writers. On 18 May 1929, Motion Picture News reported that production was resuming under the direction of E. Mason Hopper, as Sedgwick had begun another assignment by that time.
       The 6 Jul 1929 Hollywood Filmograph announced the new title, Navy Blues, and named Clarence Brown as the director. The 20 Jul 1929 Motion Picture News explained that all the previous work done on The Gob had been scrapped, and the story had been changed, keeping only the “naval background.” Haines and Page were still attached to co-star in the “all talking” production, which would mark the first for Haines. Principal photography on the revamped picture began on 20 Jul 1929, as indicated in the 3 Aug 1929 Motion Picture News.
       The 14 Aug 1929 Var reported that filming was currently taking place “on the Pacific with the destroyer fleet.”
       The 10 Aug 1929 and 7 Sep 1929 editions of Motion Picture News added Harry Woods to the cast, and noted that William Haines’s sisters, Ann and Lillian Haines, would appear as background actors in the picture.
       According to the 13 Nov 1929 Var, four directors contributed to Navy Blues. Following Sedgwick and Brown, David Burton and Sam Woods were reportedly called in to complete scenes.
       The 21 Sep 1929 Motion Picture News production chart listed a 23 Nov 1929 release date, but two months later, the 16 Nov 1929 edition announced a 20 Dec 1929 release. The 1 Jan 1930 Var confirmed that the picture had opened in several cities by late Dec 1929. The New York opening was held on 10 Jan 1930 at the Capitol Theatre, according to the 15 Jan 1930 Var review.
       Both Var and the 12 Jan 1930 FD review complained of the weak plot and forced comedy.

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SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Exhibitors Herald-World
20 Apr 1929
p. 43
Exhibitors Herald-World
25 May 1929
p. 28
Exhibitors Herald-World
13 Jul 1929
p. 33
Exhibitors Herald-World
27 Jul 1929
p. 48
Film Daily
31 Jan 1929
p. 8
Film Daily
12 Jan 1930
p. 13
Hollywood Filmograph
6 Jul 1929
p. 7
Motion Picture News
16 Feb 1929
p. 498
Motion Picture News
30 Mar 1929
p. 986
Motion Picture News
18 May 1929
p. 1738
Motion Picture News
20 Jul 1929
p. 279
Motion Picture News
3 Aug 1929
p. 502
Motion Picture News
10 Aug 1929
p. 634
Motion Picture News
7 Sep 1929
p. 948
Motion Picture News
21 Sep 1929
p. 1090
Motion Picture News
2 Nov 1929
p. 96
Motion Picture News
16 Nov 1929
p. 53
New York Times
11 Jan 1930
p. 21
Variety
24 Apr 1929
p. 10
Variety
8 May 1929
p. 4
Variety
14 Aug 1929
p. 21
Variety
13 Nov 1929
p. 64
Variety
1 Jan 1930
p. 8
Variety
15 Jan 1930
p. 37
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTOR
PHOTOGRAPHY
Merritt B. Gerstad
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
COSTUMES
Ward
SOUND
G. A. Burns
Rec eng
Rec eng
SOURCES
SONGS
"Navy Blues," words by Roy Turk, music by Fred E. Ahlert.
SONGWRITER/COMPOSER
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
The Gob
Release Date:
20 December 1929
Premiere Information:
New York opening: 10 Jan 1930
Production Date:
began 20 Jul 1929
Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Distributing Corp.
2 January 1930
LP959
Physical Properties:
Sound
Movietone
Black and White
Sound, also silent
Also si; 6,195 ft.
Duration(in mins):
75
Length(in feet):
6,936
Length(in reels):
9
Country:
United States
Language:
English
SYNOPSIS

Kelly, a sailor on shore leave, meets Alice at a dancehall, and she takes his flirtatious behavior seriously. When her parents object to the relationship, Alice leaves home to join Kelly, causing him to reconsider his position; and he sees to it that she is properly installed in a hotel just as his liberty expires. After a cruise, Kelly returns and is happily united with the ...

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Kelly, a sailor on shore leave, meets Alice at a dancehall, and she takes his flirtatious behavior seriously. When her parents object to the relationship, Alice leaves home to join Kelly, causing him to reconsider his position; and he sees to it that she is properly installed in a hotel just as his liberty expires. After a cruise, Kelly returns and is happily united with the girl.

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GENRE
Genre:


Subject
Subject (Major):

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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KEEP EXPLORING
Dance halls, Flirtation, Sailors
The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.