Night Life in Hollywood (1922)

Melodrama | 15 November 1922

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HISTORY

Night Life in Hollywood was conceived by Mrs. A. B. Maescher, a Los Angeles, CA, businesswoman associated with the DeLuxe Building Company, as noted in a 29 Apr 1922 Camera article. Around the spring of 1922, Maescher opened temporary headquarters at Hollywood Studios to begin producing feature films, the first of which, Night Life in Hollywood, she envisioned as a “big, wholesome story” featuring “the beautiful homes of Hollywood and Beverly.” Under her newly formed production company, initially called the DeLuxe Film Company, Maescher self-financed the picture with an estimated $100,000, the 3 May 1922 LAT reported. According to Camera, she planned to maximize production value by putting less money into salaries, and more money into physical production.
       Night Life in Hollywood was in its first week of filming as of 15 Apr 1922, according to that day’s Camera, which listed the scenarist as John B. Clymer and assistant director as Fred Bain. (Clymer was also named as the screenwriter in the 24 Jun 1922 Exhibitors Herald.) On 27 May 1922, an item in Camera indicated that filming had ended, and listed Al Breslan as the cameraman. The 10 Jun 1922 issue listed W. E. Keefe as editor and titler, Hubert Win as cutter, and Bruce Caldwell as assistant director.
       Filming locations included the Los Angeles, CA, residences of some famous actors, including the Hollywood “castle” owned by Sessue Hayakawa, and the swimming pool at Will Rogers’s residence, as noted in the 1 Jul 1922 Exhibitors Trade Review, which also touted a crowd scene featuring 75,000 ...

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Night Life in Hollywood was conceived by Mrs. A. B. Maescher, a Los Angeles, CA, businesswoman associated with the DeLuxe Building Company, as noted in a 29 Apr 1922 Camera article. Around the spring of 1922, Maescher opened temporary headquarters at Hollywood Studios to begin producing feature films, the first of which, Night Life in Hollywood, she envisioned as a “big, wholesome story” featuring “the beautiful homes of Hollywood and Beverly.” Under her newly formed production company, initially called the DeLuxe Film Company, Maescher self-financed the picture with an estimated $100,000, the 3 May 1922 LAT reported. According to Camera, she planned to maximize production value by putting less money into salaries, and more money into physical production.
       Night Life in Hollywood was in its first week of filming as of 15 Apr 1922, according to that day’s Camera, which listed the scenarist as John B. Clymer and assistant director as Fred Bain. (Clymer was also named as the screenwriter in the 24 Jun 1922 Exhibitors Herald.) On 27 May 1922, an item in Camera indicated that filming had ended, and listed Al Breslan as the cameraman. The 10 Jun 1922 issue listed W. E. Keefe as editor and titler, Hubert Win as cutter, and Bruce Caldwell as assistant director.
       Filming locations included the Los Angeles, CA, residences of some famous actors, including the Hollywood “castle” owned by Sessue Hayakawa, and the swimming pool at Will Rogers’s residence, as noted in the 1 Jul 1922 Exhibitors Trade Review, which also touted a crowd scene featuring 75,000 background actors taken at the Hollywood Bowl; the 23 Sep 1922 Exhibitors Trade Review later claimed 60,000 background actors appeared in the Hollywood Bowl scene, which depicted an Easter ceremony. Meanwhile, the 12 Aug 1922 Exhibitors Herald featured a set picture with the outrageous claim that one million people had participated in the one of the film’s crowd scenes.
       In Jun 1922, Maescher traveled to New York City with her general manager, Eugene Evans, to arrange a world premiere there, according to the 22 Jul 1922 Exhibitors Trade Review. Distribution plans were said to be up in the air, as Maescher was considering either selling the rights or self-distributing. The following month, a news brief in the 12 Aug 1922 Exhibitors Trade Review announced that distribution rights had been sold to Arrow Film Corp. An early fall 1922 release date was cited in the 26 Aug 1922 Exhibitors Trade Review. The film ultimately premiered in Atlantic City, NJ, on 11 Sep 1922, according to the 23 Sep 1922 Motion Picture News.
       An article in the 9 May 1923 Film Daily stated that Ernest A. Gagnon had filed suit against A. B. Maescher, claiming he was falsely promised distribution rights to this film, and seeking $150,000 in damages.
       Night Life in Hollywood was linked to a series of at least three other films directed by Fred Caldwell, as stated in the 7 Apr 1923 Camera. The films included Bishop of Hollywood, The Shiek of Hollywood, and Hollywood’s Greatest Lover; however, they appear to have been short subjects.
       According to the Library of Congress American Silent Feature Film Survival Database, an incomplete version of this film is held in the U.S. Archive.

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GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Camera
15 Apr 1922
p. 10
Camera
29 Apr 1922
p. 1
Camera
27 May 1922
p. 11
Camera
29 May 1922
p. 18
Camera
10 Jun 1922
p. 4, 11
Camera
24 Jun 1922
p. 18
Camera
29 Jul 1922
p. 4
Camera
7 Apr 1923
p. 13
Exhibitors Herald
17 Jun 1922
p. 72
Exhibitors Herald
24 Jun 1922
p. 72
Exhibitors Herald
12 Aug 1922
p. 49
Exhibitors Herald
30 Sep 1922
p. 26, 52
Exhibitors Trade Review
1 Jul 1922
p. 273
Exhibitors Trade Review
22 Jul 1922
p. 587
Exhibitors Trade Review
12 Aug 1922
p. 752
Exhibitors Trade Review
26 Aug 1922
p. 868
Exhibitors Trade Review
23 Sep 1922
p. 1110
Exhibitors Trade Review
30 Sep 1922
p. 1175
Film Daily
9 Dec 1922
p. 4
Film Daily
13 Dec 1922
p. 1
Film Daily
9 May 1923
p. 4
Motion Picture Booking Guide
Apr 1923
p. 76
Motion Picture News
23 Sep 1922
p. 1519
Moving Picture World
2 Sep 1922
p. 44
DETAILS
Release Date:
15 November 1922
Premiere Information:
Atlantic City, NJ, premiere: 11 Sep 1922
Production Date:
mid Apr--May 1922
Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
A. B. Maescher Productions
2 August 1922
LP18104
Physical Properties:
Silent
Black and White
Length(in feet):
6,059
Length(in reels):
6
Country:
United States
Language:
English
SYNOPSIS

Joe and his sister, Carrie, set out from Arkansas for the modern Babylon they believe Hollywood to be. Their attempts to lead a wild life backfire, they soon realize that Hollywood people are no different from the folks back home, and even their parents, Ma and Pa Powell, approve of Joe's love for Leonore Baxter when they understand the situation. The several scenes of Hollywood and its stars include Will Rogers' home and an Easter service at the Hollywood ...

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Joe and his sister, Carrie, set out from Arkansas for the modern Babylon they believe Hollywood to be. Their attempts to lead a wild life backfire, they soon realize that Hollywood people are no different from the folks back home, and even their parents, Ma and Pa Powell, approve of Joe's love for Leonore Baxter when they understand the situation. The several scenes of Hollywood and its stars include Will Rogers' home and an Easter service at the Hollywood Bowl.

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GENRE
Genre:


Subject

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.