No Man's Gold (1926)

Western | 29 August 1926

Director:

Lewis Seiler

Writer:

John Stone

Cinematographer:

Daniel B. Clark

Production Company:

Fox Film Corp.
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HISTORY

The only surviving print of No Man's Gold was discovered on a farm in Czechoslovakia in 1966 and preserved by the National Film Archive in Prague. A restored copy, with Czech intertitles, was loaned to the 23rd Annual San Francisco Film Festival for a 2 Jun 2018 screening. ...

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The only surviving print of No Man's Gold was discovered on a farm in Czechoslovakia in 1966 and preserved by the National Film Archive in Prague. A restored copy, with Czech intertitles, was loaned to the 23rd Annual San Francisco Film Festival for a 2 Jun 2018 screening.

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GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Film Daily
1 Aug 1926
---
Variety
15 Sep 1926
p. 17
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCER
WRITERS
Scen
Adpt
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dan Clark
Dir of photog
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the novel Dead Man's Gold by J. Allen Dunn (New York, 1920).
LITERARY SOURCE AUTHOR
DETAILS
Release Date:
29 August 1926
Production Date:

Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Fox Film Corp.
8 August 1926
LP23030
Physical Properties:
Silent
Black and White
Length(in feet):
5,745
Length(in reels):
6
Country:
United States
Language:
English
SYNOPSIS

On the orders of Krell, a miner en route to restake a lost mine is killed by Healy. Tom and his sidekick, Lefty, discover the dying man, who divides a map of the mine into three parts and leaves his small son in their care. They attend a rodeo, and there Tom comes to the aid of Jane Rogers, one of the contestants, and licks Krell when he interferes. Krell is joined by Healy, and they set out for the mine; Jane, learning of Healy's plotting with Krell, rides to warn Tom and is captured by Krell. With the aid of his horse, Tony, Tom rescues Jane, then demolishes the shack in which the gang is hiding. With the demise of the villains, Tom and Jane are ...

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On the orders of Krell, a miner en route to restake a lost mine is killed by Healy. Tom and his sidekick, Lefty, discover the dying man, who divides a map of the mine into three parts and leaves his small son in their care. They attend a rodeo, and there Tom comes to the aid of Jane Rogers, one of the contestants, and licks Krell when he interferes. Krell is joined by Healy, and they set out for the mine; Jane, learning of Healy's plotting with Krell, rides to warn Tom and is captured by Krell. With the aid of his horse, Tony, Tom rescues Jane, then demolishes the shack in which the gang is hiding. With the demise of the villains, Tom and Jane are united.

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GENRE
Genre:


Subject

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.