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HISTORY

The 31 May 1927 FD announced that First National Pictures, Inc. had purchased screen rights to the 1926 play, The Noose, by H. H. Van Loan and Willard Mack. One week later, FD reported that Richard Barthelmess would star in the picture. The 24 Jun 1927 Motion Picture News stated that Ray Rockett, brother of First National’s production chief, Al Rockett, would serve as production manager.
       According to the 12 Jul 1927 FD, Alfred Santell, who had directed several of Barthelmess’s films, would direct The Noose. However, he did not remain with the project as it appears that scheduling conflicts arose with Santell’s other production, The Gorilla (1927, see entry).
       The 17 Jul 1927 FD and the 29 Jul 1927 Motion Picture News announced that writer Bess Meredyth was preparing the adaptation, with production expected to begin in early Aug 1927. On 21 Aug 1927, FD reported that Philip Bartholomae was adapting the play. However, the 10 Oct 1927 edition attributed the adaptation to James T. O’Donohoe, who received sole onscreen credit for his contribution.
       On 2 Oct 1927, FD named John Francis Dillon as the new director. The 24 Oct 1927 FD announced that principal photography was finally underway at First National Studios in Burbank, CA. One month later, the 21 Nov 1927 edition noted that filming had ended, and reported that Barthelmess had departed for a vacation to Yosemite National Park. The Jan 1928 Picture Play stated that Madeline Hurlock acted in the picture.
       According to the 5 Dec 1927 ... More Less

The 31 May 1927 FD announced that First National Pictures, Inc. had purchased screen rights to the 1926 play, The Noose, by H. H. Van Loan and Willard Mack. One week later, FD reported that Richard Barthelmess would star in the picture. The 24 Jun 1927 Motion Picture News stated that Ray Rockett, brother of First National’s production chief, Al Rockett, would serve as production manager.
       According to the 12 Jul 1927 FD, Alfred Santell, who had directed several of Barthelmess’s films, would direct The Noose. However, he did not remain with the project as it appears that scheduling conflicts arose with Santell’s other production, The Gorilla (1927, see entry).
       The 17 Jul 1927 FD and the 29 Jul 1927 Motion Picture News announced that writer Bess Meredyth was preparing the adaptation, with production expected to begin in early Aug 1927. On 21 Aug 1927, FD reported that Philip Bartholomae was adapting the play. However, the 10 Oct 1927 edition attributed the adaptation to James T. O’Donohoe, who received sole onscreen credit for his contribution.
       On 2 Oct 1927, FD named John Francis Dillon as the new director. The 24 Oct 1927 FD announced that principal photography was finally underway at First National Studios in Burbank, CA. One month later, the 21 Nov 1927 edition noted that filming had ended, and reported that Barthelmess had departed for a vacation to Yosemite National Park. The Jan 1928 Picture Play stated that Madeline Hurlock acted in the picture.
       According to the 5 Dec 1927 FD, Garrett Graham was currently writing the film’s titles. Two weeks later, the 20 Dec 1927 issue noted that the Graham had finished, and an early 1928 release date was anticipated.
       The 15 Jan 1928 FD review praised The Noose as “a mighty fine production,” and Dillon’s direction as “masterful.” The story was noted as being “tense, dramatic, and tear wringing” with “corking” suspense. The 21 Mar 1928 Var echoed FD in praising the “extremely well directed” film, noting Dillon’s effective and unusual use of natural light in several sequences.
       As part of the first Academy Awards held in 1929, Richard Barthelmess received a certificate of honorable mention for his work on this film and for his work on The Patent Leather Kid (1927, see entry).
       Van Loan and Mack’s play was also the basis of the 1936 Paramount film I'd Give My Life, directed by Edwin L. Marin and starring Sir Guy Standing and Frances Drake (see entry).
The 31 May 1927 FD announced that First National Pictures, Inc. had purchased screen rights to the 1926 play, The Noose, by H. H. Van Loan and Willard Mack. One week later, FD reported that Richard Barthelmess would star in the picture. The 24 Jun 1927 Motion Picture News stated that Ray Rockett, brother of First National’s production chief, Al Rockett, would serve as production manager.
       According to the 12 Jul 1927 FD, Alfred Santell, who had directed several of Barthelmess’s films, would direct The Noose. However, he did not remain with the project as it appears that scheduling conflicts arose with Santell’s other production, The Gorilla (1927, see entry).
       The 17 Jul 1927 FD and the 29 Jul 1927 Motion Picture News announced that writer Bess Meredyth was preparing the adaptation, with production expected to begin in early Aug 1927. On 21 Aug 1927, FD reported that Philip Bartholomae was adapting the play. However, the 10 Oct 1927 edition attributed the adaptation to James T. O’Donohoe, who received sole onscreen credit for his contribution.
       On 2 Oct 1927, FD named John Francis Dillon as the new director. The 24 Oct 1927 FD announced that principal photography was finally underway at First National Studios in Burbank, CA. One month later, the 21 Nov 1927 edition noted that filming had ended, and reported that Barthelmess had departed for a vacation to Yosemite National Park. The Jan 1928 Picture Play stated that Madeline Hurlock acted in the picture.
       According to the 5 Dec 1927 FD, Garrett Graham was currently writing the film’s titles. Two weeks later, the 20 Dec 1927 issue noted that the Graham had finished, and an early 1928 release date was anticipated.
       The 15 Jan 1928 FD review praised The Noose as “a mighty fine production,” and Dillon’s direction as “masterful.” The story was noted as being “tense, dramatic, and tear wringing” with “corking” suspense. The 21 Mar 1928 Var echoed FD in praising the “extremely well directed” film, noting Dillon’s effective and unusual use of natural light in several sequences.
       As part of the first Academy Awards held in 1929, Richard Barthelmess received a certificate of honorable mention for his work on this film and for his work on The Patent Leather Kid (1927, see entry).
       Van Loan and Mack’s play was also the basis of the 1936 Paramount film I'd Give My Life, directed by Edwin L. Marin and starring Sir Guy Standing and Frances Drake (see entry). More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Film Daily
31 May 1927
p. 7.
Film Daily
7 Jun 1927
p. 2.
Film Daily
12 Jul 1927
p. 10.
Film Daily
17 Jul 1927
p. 6.
Film Daily
21 Aug 1927
p. 12.
Film Daily
2 Oct 1927
p. 5.
Film Daily
10 Oct 1927
p. 5.
Film Daily
24 Oct 1927
p. 5.
Film Daily
21 Nov 1927
p. 9.
Film Daily
5 Dec 1927
p. 7.
Film Daily
20 Dec 1927
p. 4.
Film Daily
15 Jan 1928
p. 6.
Film Daily
19 Mar 1928
p. 4.
Motion Picture News
24 Jun 1927
p. 2445.
Motion Picture News
29 Jul 1927
p. 281.
New York Times
19 Mar 1928
p. 26.
Picture Play
Jan 1928
p. 48.
Variety
21 Mar 1928
pp. 18-19.
DETAILS
Release Date:
29 January 1928
Premiere Information:
New York opening: 19 March 1928
Production Date:
late October--late November 1927
Copyright Claimant:
First National Pictures, Inc.
Copyright Date:
4 January 1928
Copyright Number:
LP24832
Physical Properties:
Silent
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
75
Length(in feet):
7,331
Length(in reels):
8
Country:
United States
Language:
English
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

A hijacker is told by a gangster, whom he believes to be his father, that his mother is the governor's wife. In an angry protest against crime, the boy kills the gangster/father. He is arrested, tried, and sentenced to die. The governor's wife expresses interest in the case and saves her son's life on the execution day by begging her husband to pardon ... +


A hijacker is told by a gangster, whom he believes to be his father, that his mother is the governor's wife. In an angry protest against crime, the boy kills the gangster/father. He is arrested, tried, and sentenced to die. The governor's wife expresses interest in the case and saves her son's life on the execution day by begging her husband to pardon him. +

GENRE
Genre:


Subject

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.